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Comment: Dispatched from the US -- Expect delivery in 2-3 weeks. 1968 Hardcover col. illus. . [48] p. Former Library books. "An Ariel book." ; "Originally published in 1916 as part of [the author's] Old Peter's Russian tales." ; When the Czar proclaims that he will marry his daughter to the man who brings him a flying ship, the Fool of the World sets out to try his luck and meets some unusual companions on the way. Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
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The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship: A Russian Tale Hardcover – Jan 1968

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 48 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar Straus Giroux (Jan. 1968)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0374324425
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374324421
  • Product Dimensions: 26.8 x 1.5 x 23.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 571,531 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

His mother couldn't take time to see him on his way, but the Fool of the World found the flying ship and the companions whose powers would gain him the Czar's daughter., Made visible in the rather raw colors of peasant decoration and with an air of good-humored raffishness, this boasts Brueghel-like panoramas of old Russia from the flying ship, laconic closeups of the Swift-goer, the Eater, the Drinker, etc. doing his thing. ??There's no show-off about Uri Shulevitz's illustrations; they serve the story and serve it up in character. Altogether one of the most pungent of Old Peter's Russian Tales done to a turn. (Kirkus Reviews) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 15 May 1999
Format: Paperback
This children's book is a retelling of an old Russian tale by Arthur Ransome, who had first published the story way back in 1916. It is about an honest and innocent young boy who tries to find a flying ship and, in so doing, encounters several men with unique abilities. At the end of the story, the boy wins the hand of the Czar's daughter and the boy is no longer regarded as a fool. I am certain that I shall be in the minority in my opinion because I see a slightly darker side to the old folktale. I think that the young lad is more foolish than the original author intended. He had discovered flight yet failed to use it to help others or to advance his kingdom. He found people with magical and unusual powers but fails to use them to help others or to better the Kingdom after the original "mission" had been completed. The book was illustrated by Uri Shulevitz and it won the 1969 Caldecott Medal for best illustrations in a book for children.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 July 2004
Format: Hardcover
The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship won the Caldecott Medal in 1969 as the best illustrated American children's book in that year. The illustrations feature bright colors, subtle shadings, and stylistically interesting pen highlights to suggest outlines and details. The illustrations take you enjoyably into a magical world for a fascinating journey, and greatly add to the pleasure of this traditional Russian tale. The story is build around the theme of: "You see how God loves simple folk."
A family has three sons, two who are clever and one who is foolish but who "never did anyone a harm in his life." The parents were proud of their clever sons and disappointed in their foolish one. When the news comes that the Czar wants a flying ship, the parents support the efforts of the two clever sons. They set off and are never heard from again. When the foolish son sets off, he gets the the minimum of support and encouragement.
The foolish soon runs into an ancient man The foolish son offers to share his meager food, apologizing to the ancient man. But when he opens his bag, marvelous food appears instead. The ancient man has magical powers and teaches the foolish son how to make a flying ship for the Czar. The ancient man also advises the foolish son to take along everyone he meets on his trip to the Czar's palace to deliver the flying ship.
Along the way, the foolish son meets a most unusual set of people with great individualized talents. As you read the book, you will be wondering what their significance could possibly be. They turn out to be a sort of 19th century X-Men.
The promised reward for bringing the flying ship had been the hand of the Czar's daughter in marriage and a rich dowry.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 24 July 2004
Format: Paperback
The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship won the Caldecott Medal in 1969 as the best illustrated American children's book in that year. The illustrations feature bright colors, subtle shadings, and stylistically interesting pen highlights to suggest outlines and details. The illustrations take you enjoyably into a magical world for a fascinating journey, and greatly add to the pleasure of this traditional Russian tale. The story is build around the theme of: "You see how God loves simple folk."
A family has three sons, two who are clever and one who is foolish but who "never did anyone a harm in his life." The parents were proud of their clever sons and disappointed in their foolish one. When the news comes that the Czar wants a flying ship, the parents support the efforts of the two clever sons. They set off and are never heard from again. When the foolish son sets off, he gets the the minimum of support and encouragement.
The foolish soon runs into an ancient man The foolish son offers to share his meager food, apologizing to the ancient man. But when he opens his bag, marvelous food appears instead. The ancient man has magical powers and teaches the foolish son how to make a flying ship for the Czar. The ancient man also advises the foolish son to take along everyone he meets on his trip to the Czar's palace to deliver the flying ship.
Along the way, the foolish son meets a most unusual set of people with great individualized talents. As you read the book, you will be wondering what their significance could possibly be. They turn out to be a sort of 19th century X-Men.
The promised reward for bringing the flying ship had been the hand of the Czar's daughter in marriage and a rich dowry.
Read more ›
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Dec. 1998
Format: Paperback
Robin Williams made an audio version of this story that my younger brother would replay for hours on end...It's hilarious and engaging, with his obvious talent for the voices...
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By Ms. S. Bell on 26 Mar. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I know this story from the Cosgrove Hall animation (which is fab!), so decided to buy the book for my children to acquaint them with the tale, as theyre a bit young for the dvd yet, but I was rather disappointed with this book. The illustrations are quaint but sparse/lack-lustre, especially given the vibrant scope of the story and they definately dont inspire imaginative engagement with the text for any age group. However the company that sold the book dispatched it in good time and it was in the condition described (which was fine for the cheap price). Regarding a recommendation, Id say purchase/watch the DVD instead!!!
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