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The Five People You Meet in Heaven Audio Download – Unabridged

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Product Description

The Five People You Meet in Heaven is a wonderfully moving fable that addresses the meaning of life, and life after death, in the poignant way that made Tuesdays with Morrie such an astonishing book. The novel's protagonist is an elderly amusement park maintenance worker named Eddie who, while operating a ride called the "Free Fall", dies while trying to save a young girl who gets in the way of a falling cart that hurtles to earth. Eddie goes to heaven, where he meets five people who were unexpectedly instrumental in some way in his life. While each guide takes him through heaven, Eddie learns a little bit more about what his time on earth meant, what he was supposed to have learned, and what his true purpose on earth was. Throughout there are dramatic flashbacks where we see scenes from his troubled childhood, his years in the army in the Philippines jungle, and with his first and only love, his wife Marguerite. The Five People You Meet in Heaven is the perfect book to follow Tuesdays with Morrie. Its compellingly affecting themes and lyrical writing will fascinate Mitch Albom's huge readership.
©2006 Mitch Albom; (P)2006 Hyperion

Product details

  • Audio Download
  • Listening Length: 4 hours and 37 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Hachette Audio UK
  • Release Date: 28 April 2006
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002SQ8U06

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

153 of 163 people found the following review helpful By Stella TOP 100 REVIEWER on 20 April 2008
Format: Paperback
This was such a lovely, hopeful and thought provoking work of fiction. But here's the thing - a bit of me believes/hopes that it's bordering on fact.

Mitch Albom's 'The Five People You Meet In Heaven' tells the tale of Eddie, the fairground maintainance man and his story begins on his 83rd birthday.......his last day on earth.

To help him put his lifetime into perspective he is met in heaven by 5 people from his past, some he knows - some he doesn't, but they all hold information that will help Eddie make sense of his life and understand what led him to arrive in heaven on the day he did.

The message seems to be that whether we are aware of it or not, everything happens for a reason but more importantly, even trivial things can shape a person and that every encounter, occurance or event is tightly woven into the fabric of our lives.

It is a very quick read, at just over 100 pages, but Mr Albom's writing style seems to pack a lot into those 100 pages. It's not 'gripping' or 'fast paced' but it is a page turner. I read it in one sitting as I couldn't wait to find out who Eddie's 5 people were and what his personal heaven would be.

I don't think I've ever sobbed as much over a book as I did at the bittersweet ending of this one. I didn't see the 5th person coming and was literally moved to tears at their fragment of Eddie's life.

It gets 5 out of 5 from me and I'm so glad I've read it.
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108 of 119 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Jolley HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Sept. 2004
Format: Hardcover
In many ways, The Five People You Meet in Heaven is a simple little book; as is so often the case, the most profound of answers are revealed most clearly in the simplest of explanations. This is not a book about heaven in a religious sense; the truths it establishes are to be found right here in our own lives: every life has a purpose, every person and every action is related, and while you may not be able to discern it now, it all makes sense in the end.
Eddie represents all of us to some degree. Looking back on his life with regret over all the things he should have done or not done, he is almost a ghost of himself. Since the death of his wife, he has basically gone through the motions, working at the same job his father worked before him, dealing with the bad dreams brought on by his wartime experience, watching his body deteriorate to the point that he can barely get around, waiting for nothing, feeling nothing but regret. He always wanted to get away from his father and live an entirely different sort of life, yet he wound up taking over his father's job, living in the same building, failing to achieve any of the hopes and dreams he embraced so tightly as a young man. His wife was his only anchor, and she has been dead a long time now.
When we first meet Eddie, he is about to die. The end is just another beginning, however, and we learn the story of Eddie's life as the novel progresses. Heaven is not what he expected; he finds no peace here at all. Happiness cannot come without understanding, however, and five people are waiting to explain Eddie's life to him. They include people he barely knew or did not know at all, yet he soon learns what a huge influence he had in their earthly lives. Each one imparts to Eddie a lesson he must learn in order to find peace.
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50 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Dr JOY Madden on 23 Jan. 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a self development book that makes you think about the effect you have - unknowingly - on other people's lives. `The Five People You Meet In Heaven' was written by Mitch Albom, author of the international bestseller `Tuesdays With Morrie'. Whether you believe in heaven or not, it is interesting to read how the author portrays what happens after death and what his take is on the meaning of life.

On the Surface

Eddie is a `maintenance man' at an amusement park. The book starts with a count-down to Eddie's death, over the course of an hour, and what he did in that time as he went about his job in that park not realising that it would be for the last time.

On dying in an accident at that amusement park, Eddie goes on a journey of self discovery, meeting five important people in heaven. Each of them was in his life for a specific reason - some only momentarily. And every one of the five was affected by Eddie's life in a profound way. Eddie sees them once more in heaven as they each have something to teach him.

In between each chapter or so is a page or two recounting important periods in Eddie's past, e.g., specific birthdays from his childhood to adulthood. From the point of view of this self development book review, it is interesting how the two stories work in conjunction with each other.

The Underlying Message

Many people believe that during the course of their life several people come into it and make a difference to them. This book makes you look at life the other way round. Who are the people that YOU touch without you actually realising? What is the impact that YOU make on others without your knowledge?

Sometimes the effect is instantaneous, dramatic and you know about it straight away.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 30 Jun. 2004
Format: Hardcover
The title and book concept have intrigued me since I first heard about the book. I don't know any religions that describe the experience in Heaven as beginning by meeting five people from your past life, so I took the book to be a parable rather than a literal attempt to describe Heavenly life. I was quite pleased (for the most part) with what I found. I recommend this book to anyone who will not feel like their religion is being cast in doubt by the book's premise.
Many self-help gurus encourage us to imagine our funeral service and what would be said about us. I think there's a lot of merit to that concept. Mr. Albom has added another important element to that concept: What were the unintended effects that others had on our lives and we on theirs? Cast in that light, even the most mundane life is suddenly filled with drama and greater significance. I hope Mr. Albom will consider writing a self-help book that allows us to think through the lessons of this book for our own lives.
To describe what happens in Heaven in the book would be to spoil the book for you . . . so I won't. I found the book constantly surprising and interesting, and a quick read. One of the underlying themes of the book is the need to be more accepting of one another . . . and the consequences of our actions. In that regard, I thought the story was weak only in developing the resolution of his relationship with one of his parents. Other than that flaw, I would have enthusiastically graded the book at five stars.
Let me quote the book's intriguing opening paragraph to give you a flavor of why you may want to read this book:
"This is a story about a man named Eddie and it begins at the end, with Eddie dying in the sun. It might seem strange to start a story with an ending. But all endings are also beginnings.
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