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The First Men in the Moon Paperback – 2 Apr 2014


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Product details

  • Paperback: 150 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (2 April 2014)
  • ISBN-10: 1497394325
  • ISBN-13: 978-1497394322
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 0.9 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)

Product Description

Book Description

The classic science fiction novel rejoins the Masterworks list in an affordable hardback format and a new introduction by Lisa Tuttle. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, Kent in 1866. After working as a draper's apprentice and pupil-teacher, he won a scholarship to the Normal School of Science in 1884, studying under T. H. Huxley. He was awarded a first-class honours degree in biology and resumed teaching but had to retire after a kick from an ill-natured pupil afflicted his kidneys. He worked in poverty in London as a crammer while experimenting in journalism and stories. It was with THE TIME MACHINE (1895) that he had his real breakthrough. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kurt A. Johnson on 18 May 2004
Format: Paperback
When the young and penniless Mr. Bedford meets an eccentric scientist, Mr. Cavor, who doesn't realize the importance of his own inventions, it seems most fortuitous. Of greatest interest is Cavor's realization that he can create a substance that shields against gravity. Together, they come to the conclusion that, with this new substance, they can make ships to take them to other planets within the solar system. And so, with Cavor dreaming of scientific breakthroughs and Bedford dreaming of wealth, the two build such a ship, and set off for the Moon.
Arriving at the Moon, the two quickly realize what a strange and amazing place it is. During the lunar day, there is a breathable atmosphere on the surface of the Moon, and their investigations soon demonstrate that the Moon is inhabited by a race of intelligent beings. An insectoid race, the Selenites (or "Moonies" as Cavor whimsically dubs them) have a highly-organized caste system much like terrestrial ants. Can our heroes escape from the Selenites and return to Earth? And, what are the long-term affects of this new meeting of societies going to be?
H.G. Wells (1866-1946) is often remembered for his late-nineteenth century science-fiction, including The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, and The War of the Worlds. This book was first published in 1900, and shows a different side of Wells. Whereas his earlier book were rather preachy, this book is more light-hearted, telling a cracking good story for its own enjoyment, rather than being a vehicle to teach a lesson.
Yep, this is a fun read, and a fascinating sci-fi book. As might be expected from such an old book, the "science" that Wells used is extremely out of date. But, if you are willing to practice a little suspension of disbelief, you will be treated to an excellent story. The story hangs together well with then current science, and shows you science-fiction from an entirely different angle. I really enjoyed this book, and highly recommend it to you.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. J. Davenport on 24 Nov. 2004
Format: Paperback
I have always prefered to read Jules Verne over H.G.Wells because I prefer Verne's style of writing. I have often considered Wells' writing to be similar to reading a newspaper article. However I have a very different opinion of this great writer having recently read this book, which I have to say is now one of my faviourites of this genre.
I feel that the chracters Wells creates in this book are memorable, and crafted with skill. The plot is thoroughly entertaing, with Wells' ideas about getting to the moon very interesting. The inhabitants of the moon are really original characters in their own right and are unlike creatures that i have previously read about.
If you as a reader can get past the idea that two Englishmen are walking around on the moon without the need for respiratory equipment then you will thoroughly enjoy this book. The descriptions of the moon itself are wonderful and memorable. If you are a fan of early science fiction then you will certainly enjoy this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 19 Jan. 2000
Format: Paperback
I agree with the above reader. 'First Man In The Moon' is a wonderful piece of pre-space-age science fiction. Yes, of course it's dated, but in fact it's scientific gaucheness only adds to the charm of a good old-fashioned adventure story, and the main protagonists various exclamations and conflicts are very amusing indeed. It's also a constant surprise how much of what surely must have been purely conjectural physics at the time proved to be true once we 'got up there'. (Though I concede that the mists and giant cacti on the moon were a mite wayward of the mark!) Good fun.
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Format: Hardcover
Everybody knows HG Wells is a popular science-fiction writer. Most people know of him through a few of his stories that have been produced as popular movies such as "The Time Machine", and "The War of the Worlds." However HG Wells was really more of a philosopher and a quasi-scientist than he was a writer.

This is one of his lesser known science fiction stories published in 1901. However as with most science fiction the story is only a vehicle to carry HG's philosophy and commentary on his Victorian Society to the reader. The story has many false starts and stops but takes the time to comment on such subjects as can a person actually be satisfied with a one-dimensional job?

Knowing that this was pre-Einstein it may be possible to believe in the technology and theories of the time. And then again as with many science-fiction or fantasy stories HG may have just been taking liberalities with realities.

One cute touch in this story is that the characters comment on Jules Vern's story of the man in the moon.
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Bedford bankrupt businessman who is making a comeback by writing a play, through a series of circumstances, teams up with Professor Cavor a recluse scientist who does not realize his own potential. Together they build a contraption, sphere, that can cut off gravity waves. What can they do with such a device? You guessed it! Let's all traveled to the moon.

Once on the moon Bedford and Cavor find that they are not alone. After a few adventures they are detained by the Moonies referred to mostly in this story as Selenites. The daring duo is restrained with chains of gold. Cavor looks at this is a reasonable precaution and also looks forward to communicating with the strange creatures.
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