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The Fault in Our Stars Paperback – 3 Jan 2013


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Product details

  • Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (3 Jan 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0141345659
  • ISBN-13: 978-0141345659
  • Product Dimensions: 19.6 x 12.8 x 2.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4,463 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Ashleigh Allsopp on 2 Feb 2014
Format: Paperback
This is the third John Green novel I’ve read, and it’s definitely my favourite. As a character, Hazel captivated me from the start. She’s been terminally ill for several years, so her attitude towards life is intriguing, insightful and believable. Augustus didn’t resonate with me quite so much. He’s a little less believable – perhaps a bit overly extrovert. Nevertheless, I still understood why Hazel was so drawn to him.

The Fault in Our Stars is a quick read; I finished it within a day or two. That’s thanks to its addictive storyline and John Green’s smooth writing style that lets you forget the words and see the world beyond them instead. The direction of storyline isn’t as straight forward as I thought it would be when I first began reading, and I loved that about it. I did figure it out quite early on, but it didn’t matter.

Strangely, considering how much of an emotional wreck I can be, I didn’t actually cry while reading The Fault in Our Stars, which is a bit disappointing. I felt utterly sad, of course, but the lack of real tears tells me that my connection with the characters and their lives was not quite strong enough. I would have liked to have been pulled just a little further into the story, and I think that it was my faltering belief in Augustus that stopped me. I would have benefitted from a better understanding of Augustus, I think, but I just couldn’t quite get to grips with his personality.

That said, I’d recommend The Fault in Our Stars to everyone. It reminds you how precious life is, and how lucky we are to be healthy. It reminds you to take every opportunity you get, and I love that about it. I’m sure The Fault in Our Stars will stay with me for a long time, and I’d be tempted to revisit it again in the future if I feel like I’m forgetting.
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388 of 418 people found the following review helpful By Julia Flyte TOP 50 REVIEWER on 26 May 2012
Format: Hardcover
I have to admit, even though I'd heard this book was really good, the thought of a young adult novel about teenagers with cancer didn't hugely appeal to me. My initial reactions were also somewhat less than stellar - everyone talks in a razor-sharp, ultra witty way that feels straight out of an Aaron Sorkin or Diablo Cody movie and not even remotely how any 16 or 17 year old I know speaks. I feared that it was going to be all style without substance, bouncing along until a requisite tearjearking conclusion.

I was wrong.

This is a book peopled with a group of characters that you really care about. At its core are the star-crossed lovers, Hazel (with terminal cancer) and Augustus (a cancer survivor). They meet at a cancer support group and become close, despite Hazel's desire to avoid becoming a "grenade" in anybody's life - by which she means someone who will unwittingly cause significant hurt through their passing. They are fantastically loveable characters, who flit between deep conversations about the meaning of life and finding refuge in video games and reality TV shows. I loved them both. Still do.

But the book is more than that. It's about coming to terms with the fact that your life will almost certainly never rise above insignificance - yes, you will matter to your family and friends, hey maybe even write a few reviews that people like on Amazon, but ultimately you probably won't make any life changing impact on the world. It's about the way we shrink from people with terminal disease only to laud them when they pass. It's about the impact that terminal diseases have on the families of those left behind.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By anon on 27 Jun 2014
Format: Paperback
I appear to be the only person who didn't really like this book. The premise and plot should be very moving but I found the characters lacking in depth and quite unbelievable. I am yet to meet any teenagers who speak in the manner of the main characters save for those angst-ridden precocious souls in Dawson's Creek which is of course also fictional. The dialogue really detracted from what should have been an epic love story and there was too little background detail or internal monologue to make me fond of the characters such that when the inevitable happens I have to admit I wasn't that bothered. Aside from the overdone dialogue the rest of the narrative was very basically written, very disappointing for those of us who have read and been truly moved by such soaring stories as 'Birdsong'' and the like.
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63 of 70 people found the following review helpful By Marie on 15 Jan 2013
Format: Paperback
Hazel was diagnosed with metastatic thyroid cancer at the age of thirteen. Three years later the disease is being kept at bay indefinitely thanks to an experimental new drug. Her days are spent carting her oxygen tank between college, home, and Cancer Kid Support Group. Her treatment regime means that she has little time for friends her own age, and besides, now that she's a Cancer Kid most of them don't know how to behave around her anyway. So she is intrigued to say the least when an attractive and witty young man named Augustus Waters turns up unexpectedly at support group one week.

The predominant niggle that stopped me from really losing myself in this book is that Hazel and Gus just don't come across as realistic teenagers at all. They both have this incredibly verbose, Dawson's Creek-esque way of speaking that is laden with cheesy metaphors. The whole thing is narrated by Hazel, and the insight that that gives into her thought processes and inner dialogue makes her just about relatable, but Augustus feels like he's reading from a script the whole time. I had this sense that for every frank exchange of emotions between them, they had spent five minutes flipping through a thesaurus beforehand. I found this really annoying to the point that it prevented me from becoming emotionally invested with either of the characters.

What it does really well is illustrates how immensely trying it must be to be a sick teenager, be it with cancer or any chronic disease. I believe John Green drew on his experiences of working as a chaplain at a childrens' hospital to write the novel, and he has certainly made plenty of astute and unsentimental observations about the realities of living with illness.
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