Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin Classics) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.81
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Fall of the Roman Republic (Classics) Paperback – 25 Oct 1973


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 25 Oct 1973
£4.00 £0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

There is a newer edition of this item:


Trade In Promotion

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.


Product details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd.; New impression edition (25 Oct. 1973)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140440844
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140440843
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 1.8 x 19.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,097,203 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

About the Author

Plutarch (c.50-c.120 AD) was a writer and thinker born into a wealthy, established family of Chaeronea in central Greece. His voluminous surviving writings are broadly divided into the 'moral' works and the Parallel Lives of outstanding Greek and Roman leaders. The former (Moralia) are a mixture of rhetorical and antiquarian pieces, together with technical and moral philosophy (sometimes in dialogue form). The Lives have been influential from the Renaissance onwards.

Robin Seager is a Reader in Classics and Ancient History at the University of Liverpool and the author of a biography of Pompey.

Rex Warner (translator) translated widely from Latin and Greek including, for Penguin, Xenophon, Thucydides and Plutarch.

--This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
First Sentence
The biography of Marius is one of the least satisfactory of Plutarch's Roman lives from the historian's point of view. Read the first page
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Heino Viik on 20 Feb. 2005
Format: Paperback
This is the collection of biographies of Marius, Sulla, Crassus, Pompey, Caesar and Cicero. Plutarch tells us how these powerful men used Roman democracy for pushing their personal agendas. The pattern kept repeating: our hero finds allies and strikes alliances, gains power, gets provinces and armies voted for himself and for his friends, eventually ambitions clash and the dictator emerges through armed conflict. Many lessons on nature of man can be learned from this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By F. S. L'hoir TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 19 July 2009
Format: Paperback
If one merely wants to read an awfully good biography of some of the makers of history during the last generation of the Roman Republic, one cannot go wrong with Rex Warner's translation of Plutarch's Lives of Marius, Sulla, Pompey, Crassus, Caesar and Cicero. Each "Life" is full to the brim of goodies (Even the skimpy life of Marius has its magnificent moments, such as the Cimbri women strangling their children and stabbing themselves rather than surrender to the Romans; or Marius with his Bardyae goons, who laugh when he laughs and kill when he doesn't laugh [Godfather material!], and my favorite bit in the life of Marius is when he is tryihg to make a deal with the angry Senate at the front door of his house and his tribune Saturninus at the back door--running back and forth between the two, excusing himself each time, pretending that he has diarrhea. ["Terribly sorry, the sardines I ate at lunch must have been off!"; the subtext, not Warner].

This book is full of wonderful anecdotes that render the story of ancient Rome so entertaining.

As with the Penguin edition of "The Age of Alexander," however, the editors have skimped and not provided an index (which I notice Oxford has done) and therefore have made the book a pain to use in undergraduate classes. Again, the cover has been tarted up, but no effort has been made to facilitate students in looking up the multifarious characters in each of the lives.

Well, I'm cross with Penguin, but not with Rex Warner's splendidly readable translation!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this version of Plutarch after reading Lustrum and Imperium by Robert Harris. Basically, I just wanted to see how closely Harris kept to the original sources whilst portraying Cicero, Caesar, Crassus and Pompey - and he did a pretty good job.

This was my first venture into Plutarch and I found it interesting and rewarding, although at times the going was slow. Plutarch wrote for patient readers who believed in omens and who could handle long sentences. Like many modern readers, I am often impatient and don't have much time for omens. On the positive side, Plutarch was a marvellous exponent of the art of illustrating a character with an anecdote and trusting the readers to reach their own conclusion. These anecdotes were invariably entertaining and they handsomely made up for the "dull" bits.

My favourite lives were those of Pompey and Cicero. The characterisation of Pompey was so good I could almost feel his presence beside me. The portrayal of Cicero was equally sharp but somehow less charismatic. Cicero came across as having a cruel tongue. He was the master of the cutting remark and the not so subtle put down. Not surprisingly he managed to offend nearly everyone he met and made many enemies. Crassus was something of a disappointment. I didn't feel that Plutarch really got inside the man's head and all he revealed were a few facts, leaving the man as something of an enigma. Julius Caesar was reasonably well done. Plutarch doesn't say much about the Gallic wars, but then Caesar himself wrote those up extensively (if perhaps exaggerating the successes and brushing over the failures). To be blunt, I found Marius and Sulla boring; they were both unpleasant men of violence and ambition and Plutarch doesn't expand much on that.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Roman Clodia TOP 100 REVIEWER on 27 Jun. 2010
Format: Paperback
Writing in the first century AD, Plutarch blurs the boundaries between classical history writing and biography. In these lives of six great Romans from the age of the republic (Marius, Sulla, Crassus, Pompey, Caesar, Cicero) he re-creates them as real men, warts, quirks and all.

These lives have been the source for many of the later receptions of Rome and prominent Romans and thus have become the `truth' rather than versions of reality, but are still fascinating reading.

Plutarch originally paired up Roman and Greek (so Alexander ,for example, with Julius Caesar) so the Penguin editions do us a slight disservice in separating these lives into separate volumes, but the translation is readable and fresh.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback