The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in Yours
For a 1.90 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History [Unabridged] [Paperback]

Peter Heather
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
RRP: 12.99
Price: 9.09 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over 10. Details
You Save: 3.90 (30%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Tuesday, 22 April? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition 4.49  
Hardcover --  
Paperback, Unabridged 9.09  
Audio Download, Unabridged 22.65 or Free with Audible.co.uk 30-day free trial
Amazon.co.uk Trade-In Store
Did you know you can use your mobile to trade in your unwanted books for an Amazon.co.uk Gift Card to spend on the things you want? Visit the Books Trade-In Store for more details or check out the Trade-In Amazon Mobile App Guidelines on how to trade in using a smartphone. Learn more.

Book Description

5 May 2006

In AD 378 the Roman Empire had been the unrivalled superpower of Europe for well over four hundred years. And yet, August that year saw a small group of German-speaking asylum-seekers rout a vast Imperial army at Hadrianople, killing the Emperor and establishing themselves on Roman territory. Within a hundred years the last Emperor of the Western Empire had been deposed. What had gone wrong?

In this ground breaking book, Peter Heather proproses a stunning new solution to one of the greatest mysteries of history. Mixing authoratative analysis with thrilling narrative, he brings fresh insight into the panorama of the empire's end, from the bejewelled splendour of the imperial court to the dripping forests of "Barbaricum". He examines the extraordinary success story that was the Roman Empire and uses a new understanding of its continued strength and enduring limitations to show how Europe's barbarians, transformed by centuries of contact with Rome, eventually pulled it apart.

'a colourful and enthralling narrative . . .an account full of keen wit and an infectious relish for the period.’ Independent On Sunday

‘provides the reader with drama and lurid colour as well as analysis . . . succeeds triumphantly.’ Sunday Times

‘a fascinating story, full of ups and downs and memorable characters’ Spectator

‘bursting with action . . .one can recommend to anyone, whether specialist or interested amateur.’ History Today

'a rare combination of scholarship and flair for narrative' Tom Holland


Frequently Bought Together

The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History + The Fall of Rome: And the End of Civilization + The World of Late Antiquity: AD 150-750 (Library of European Civilization)
Price For All Three: 25.37

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Pan; Unabridged edition (5 May 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0330491369
  • ISBN-13: 978-0330491365
  • Product Dimensions: 13 x 19.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 18,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

'Meticulously and compellingly, he traces the rise of the tribe... -- The Times

'[a] ground-breaking study' -- Mail on Sunday

'it is unusual for a modern academic historian to arrive at, let alone articulate, so thorough a conclusion.' -- The Times

'this is history writing at its best' -- The Tablet

‘Ground-breaking study’ -- Mail on Sunday

From the Back Cover

In this ground-breaking book, Peter Heather proposes a new solution to one of the greatest mysteries of history: the demise of the Roman Empire. Mixing authoritative analysis with thrilling narrative, he brings fresh insight into the panorama of the empire's end, from the bejewelled splendour of the Imperial court to the dripping forests of "Barbaricum". He examines the successes of the Roman Empire and uses a new understanding of its continued strength and enduring limitations to show how Europe's barbarians, transformed by centuries of contact with Rome, eventually pulled it apart.

‘Provides the reader with drama and lurid colour as well as analysis. Like a late Roman emperor, he is determined to impose order on a fabric that is always threatening to fragment and collapse into confusion; unlike most late Roman emperors, he succeeds triumphantly.’ Sunday Times

'Heather presents the stories and the characters of this tumultuous epoch, in a colourful and enthralling narrative . . .an account full of enjoyably anachronistic flourishes, keen wit, and an infectious relish for the period.’ Independent On Sunday

‘The story is an exciting one, bursting with action, brutality . . . a gripping, and balanced account . . . one can recommend to anyone, whether specialist or interested amateur.’ History Today

‘A fascinating story, full of ups and downs and memorable characters.’ Spectator


Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
4.7 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
94 of 96 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An exceptional book 18 Aug 2006
By Henry Ireton VINE VOICE
Format:Paperback
I think some of the reviewers here are far too harsh in what they say about Heather. This is an immaculate study of the decline and fall of Rome. Heather's theories sit well within the prevailing historical consensus- he is illuminating on many of the themes that surround the fall- the rise of Barbarion tribes and the reasons for their rising and falling. He writes an analytical narrative- unlike some major popular histories he actually does analyse why things happened. The Fall of Rome can easily be reduced to battle after battle, imperial slaughter after slaughter but Heather gives you the reasons why one tribal confederacy won through, why imperial turnover was a constitutional feature of the empire. Perhaps most impressively, Heather thoroughly describes what he doesn't know as well as what he does- we don't have an internal account of the Hunnic Empire so can't know why Attilla headed west but can guess for example. Overall this is a wonderful study- full of analysis, full of narrative, which provides a coherent account of why the Empire fell and how it fell.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An enthralling account of the fall of Rome 4 Sep 2008
Format:Hardcover
This is a book which is as every bit of epic as its subject matter. Peter Heather writes in an accessible, easy-to-follow manner making this book ideal for the layperson, scholar and student. Rather than seeing the end of the western Roman Empire as a result of internal decline and internecine warfare (the Edward Gibbon approach), Heather argues that the Empire fell due to the rise of the Germanic tribes north of the Danube, both economically and politically into supergroups, which became too strong for the western resources to ovecome. Coupled with this, argues Heather, the movement of the Huns in the 370s, forcing the Greuthungi and Tervingi Goths onto Roman territory, and again between 395-420 onto the Great Hungarian Plain, forcing this time more Goths, Burgundians and Alans etc, provided the catalyst for barbarian encroachment upon Roman territory. Each loss of teritory meant loss of revenue with which to pay the diminishing legions. The most telling of losses were the rich African provinces to the Vandals. Really, it is not so much as the decline of the west, but the rise of the barbarians, caused by the sudden appearance, and disappearance, of the Huns.

Other reviewers have provided more in-depth looks at the pros and cons of this book - with which I would agree (in particular some of the contemporary language and jokes would seem out of place)- therefore I will not repeat them here. Suffice to say this is an excellent, informative account of one of the world's most important events.

Thoroughly recommended.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book on an exciting period of history 29 May 2007
By Mr X
Format:Paperback
When I first bought the book I was intimidated by its length for a while and so delayed starting to read it. However, once I stared reading it I enjoyed it so much that I read it very quickly. In fact I read the last third in one go.

The book deals very well with a number of complex themes and always has an eye on the overall argument which I will not set out here as others have done so in their comments. This period of history is certainly a very exciting one and there are many important parallels for present-day situations. That writers such as Mr Heather are producing books such as this one on the late Roman period is a benefit for us all and a change to the majority of history books published today which, I feel, tend to concentrate on much more recent history.

The Who's Who at the back of the book is very useful to keep track of the individuals mentioned in the text (as, necessarily, a book covering such a large and complex topic must deal with a many personalities). My only criticism, and it is a minor one, is that the maps could be improved; often the text refers to the maps but then goes on to discuss places that are not on the maps. Overall a brilliant and surprisingly 'unheavy' read for a book of its length.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
36 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Account of a Monumental Event 28 July 2007
Format:Paperback
The "Fall of the Roman Empire" casts a huge shadow. A vast Empire, one of the "great civilisations" of history, went in barely a century from being the "sole superpower" to a mere plaything of barbarian tribes.

Why did it happen? All sorts of reasons can be offered, and Heather offers several, but what it comes down to is that this is simply what empires do - they rise, they exist for a time - years, decades or (as in Romes's case) centuries - and then they fall. Rome had already had a better "innings" than most, and in the fifth century its luck ran out.

It is usual to blame the Fall on the Empire's internal problems, and say that it became "decadent" or whatever. Heather, probably rightly, focuses more on what was happening outside Rome's borders. The Barbarian tribes, living for centuries with that 800 pound Roman "gorilla" next door, combined into larger units like the Frankish or Gothic kingdoms, which were a tougher proposition for Rome to cope with. Everlasting warfare with these states gradually wore the Empire down, and finally another barbarian, Attila, drove many tribes from their old homes and forced them to try their luck migrating into Roman territory. This proved more than Rome (or at least its western half) could cope with. So down the tubes it went.

No doubt, had Rome not fallen from this cause, it would eventually have fallen another way. Empires are usually longer lived than individuals, but are no more immortal. But Heather does a magnificent job of showing how and why it fell as and when it did.

One minor regret. Perhaps a little more "afterword" about post-Roman Europe might have been in order. For the significant thing about the Roman Empire is not that it fell (which was bound to happen sometime) but that it was never rebuilt.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Would you like to see more reviews about this item?
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Well written and very interesting
I'm not a scholar on ancient history but I'm interested in the field and have read a number of books on ancient Rome. I loved this book. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Mr. Paul Newton
5.0 out of 5 stars Well written and very interesting
Good sound research combined with a very readable style - excellent book! A book that I would definitely recommend to others interested in this period of history.
Published 2 months ago by Gary Kitching
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book
Good book with interesting facts. Very good for research and general education about the Roman Empire and its fall. I thoroughly recommend.
Published 4 months ago by Dommy
5.0 out of 5 stars I have become a Peter Heather Fan
One of my favourite periods in history because of all the questions it throws up is the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire and the succession of the Dark Ages. Read more
Published 6 months ago by C Castleton
5.0 out of 5 stars ' Do not go gentle into that good night' (Thomas)
I was surprised when opening a book on the LATER Roman Empire to be confronted by an episode from Book V of Caesar's 'Gallic Wars' which took place in 54 B.C. Read more
Published 12 months ago by BobH
5.0 out of 5 stars Great
A very well constructed piece, well researched and vital to the understanding of anyone attempting to learn about the topic. Read more
Published 16 months ago by Matthew J. Walsh
5.0 out of 5 stars neat
This is one of the best book on the fall of Rome since Gibbon. Heather shows that Rome didn't fall, it was pushed. Read more
Published 22 months ago by Halifax Student Account
4.0 out of 5 stars The good old traditional explanation: it's the Barbarians, of course
As almost 30 reviewers have already recognized (I am number 30!), this is an excellent book and a wonderful read. Read more
Published on 3 Jan 2012 by JPS
5.0 out of 5 stars "Its the Hun Wot Done it"
Excellent, witty and knowledgeable- I thoroughly enjoyed this. Peter Heather wears his learning lightly- and while there will inevitably be areas for disagreement (for example, I... Read more
Published on 8 Oct 2011 by A. Browne
5.0 out of 5 stars absolutely first rate historical inquiry
This is a truly wonderful book, of the kind that I wish I had had when I studied this stuff in school. Read more
Published on 27 Aug 2011 by rob crawford
Search Customer Reviews
Only search this product's reviews
ARRAY(0xbb201678)

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback