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The Eternal Champion (Tale of the Eternal Champion) Hardcover – 12 Nov 1992

4.5 out of 5 stars 10 customer reviews

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Hardcover, 12 Nov 1992
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--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 530 pages
  • Publisher: Weidenfeld Military (12 Nov. 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1857980255
  • ISBN-13: 978-1857980257
  • Product Dimensions: 23.8 x 15.8 x 5.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,726,237 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Book Description

Moorcock's Multiverse presents for the first time, definitive editions of Michael Moorcock's most influential work, fully revised and updated by the author. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Michael Moorcock (1939-)
Michael Moorcock is one of the most important figures in British SF and Fantasy literature. The author of many literary novels and stories in practically every genre, his novels have won and been shortlisted for numerous awards including the Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, Whitbread and Guardian Fiction Prize. In 1999, he was given the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award; in 2001, he was inducted into the SF Hall of Fame; and in 2007, he was named a SFWA Grandmaster. Michael Moorcock is also a musician who has performed since the seventies with his own band, the Deep Fix; and, as a member of the prog rock band, Hawkwind, won a gold disc. His tenure as editor of New Worlds magazine in the sixties and seventies is seen as the high watermark of SF editorship in the UK, and was crucial in the development of the SF New Wave. Michael Moorcock's literary creations include Hawkmoon, Corum, Von Bek, Jerry Cornelius and, of course, his most famous character, Elric. He has been compared to, among others, Balzac, Dumas, Dickens, James Joyce, Ian Fleming, J.R.R. Tolkien and Robert E. Howard. Although born in London, he now splits his time between homes in Texas and Paris.

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.


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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Although published as the second volume in Moorcock's Eternal Champion series, this is really the foundation for all the other works.
The plot, about a modern day man inexplicably sucked into a parallel world of sword and sorcery, sounds like typical pulp fanatasy hokum. Fortunately, it is far from being that. John Daker becomes Erekosë, the Eternal Champion, destined to forever wander the worlds of the multiverse as a pawn in the battle between law and chaos. What makes these three volumes fascinating however, and raises them above the level of similar books, is Moorcock's focus on the psychological torment of his hero.
This is some of Moorcock's earliest writing, and, lacking in the complexities of his later work, it is an easy and enjoyable read.
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Format: Paperback
This is a very good book to get if you're interested in where it all started. While the stories themselves aren't necessarily the best Mr Moorcock ever wrote, they are amongst the most important. In this particular edition, which varies quite a bit from the UK omnibus, we get The Sundered Worlds, the book which first offered the world the idea of the multiverse, Black Holes and many other ideas since become standard in science and sf. This is my favourite edition of this book, since it also has a splendid portrait of the Champion himself. Great value, even though, come to think of it, Moorcock wrote most of this before he was 21. I am collecting these editions. They are without doubt the best.
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Format: Paperback
Review of the first book of this compilation:

As you might guess, this is another Eternal Champion book, the first in the Erekose series. It's also in many ways the first of the whole Eternal Champion cycle. It was published in 1962, but mostly written as early as 1955, making it pretty much a contemporary of Lord of the Rings.

It sits with 'The Warhound and the World's Pain' as something of an introduction to the Eternal Champion series. In the foreword to this edition, Moorcock describes this first novel as one of his least complex and least ambitious. I can see what he means - in many ways it's a straight fantasy novel - but it has a rather stronger moral commentary than most fantasy. Stephen Donaldson's 'Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, Unbeliever' shares the idea of a real world human transported to a fantasy setting as the reincarnation of a legendary hero. Certainly Erekose and Covenant take a different approach to their roles as saviour, but if you read both series, you'll appreciate when they make the same decisions. And when they don't.

It occurs to me that Covenant would probably work as an incarnation of the Eternal Champion. But I'm sure Moorcock would hate that idea.
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Format: Paperback
Note - there are a number of similarly titled books/editions: If the book listed is approx 208 page edition, then the book is the first in the Erekose trilogy. Whereas, (at time of writing) the reviews and "Search Inside" link (for the 208 page edition at least) indicate a currently out-of-print Erekose omnibus edition containing all three books (The Eternal Champion, Phoenix in Obsidian, Dragon in the Sword). This review comment will probably automatically appear for all editions. Just take a little care and make sure you are getting what you expect.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is the very beginning of the "Eternal champion" saga. John Daker, as Erekose, is summoned, much like Corum will be, by humans of another Universe, who need him to defend them from the "threat" of the Eldren, an elfin-like race inhabiting a continent of that alternate Earth. Erekose, still staggering, is instructed at lenght about the evil of the Eldren, in a language reminding us of the language used by Bin Laden and Adolf Hitler; Erekose later sees that the war techniques emploied by those humans are no different than those allegedly emploied by the "evil Eldren". And at the end Erekose will find a "final solution", having learned the truth...
As a moral tale it's bluntly overt and more than disturbing, and a bit too predictable, as there is no question as who are the bad and the good guys. Mr Moorcock was young when he wrote this, and had to learn to be subtle. Still, this novel is important as the very beginning of the Eternal Champion saga.
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