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The Eric Rohmer Collection - 8 Disc Box Set [DVD]


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Product details

  • Actors: Philippe Marlaud, Beatrice Romand, Andre Dussollier, Marie Riviere, Amira Chemakhi
  • Directors: Eric Rohmer
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: French
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 8
  • Classification: 15
  • Studio: Arrow
  • DVD Release Date: 23 May 2005
  • Run Time: 771 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0007WFTUW
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 7,620 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Collection of eight films from celebrated French auteur Eric Rohmer. 'The Aviator's Wife' (1981) is a psycholgical study of jealousy and infidelity, following a student who discovers that his girlfriend is cheating on him and who then decides to spy on her. In 'A Good Marriage' (1982), promiscuous Sabine (Béatrice Romand) decides to stop having affairs and find herself a decent husband after she meets her best friend's cousin. 'Pauline at the Beach' (1983) is a subtle comedy about holiday romance and the complexity of human relationships. Marion (Arielle Dombasle) decides to spend the last few weeks of summer at the family beach house in Normandy. She takes along her fifteen-year-old cousin Pauline (Amanda Langlet), a sensitive and fragile girl on the verge of womanhood. At the beach the two meet up with Pierre (Pascal Greggory), Marion's humourless and obsessive ex-lover. Marion soon falls for Henri, despite Pierre declaring his love for her, while Pauline discovers a holiday romance of her own. 'Full Moon in Paris' (1984) is a low-key study of a young woman who finds it impossible to settle down, flitting between her boyfriend in the country and a new potential love in Paris. 'The Green Ray' (1986) follows Delphine (Marie Riviere), a lonely young secretary who sets off on numerous trips abroad in an attempt to find a lover, with no success, and then has a chance meeting with someone on the platform at Biarritz station on the way home. 'My Girlfriend's Boyfriend' (1987) is a lighthearted comedy of manners, about two young women who meet and become friends, until each one falls for the other's boyfriend. 'Love in the Afternoon' (1972) is an earlier study of love and the nature of monogamy, following a bourgeois office worker who is gradually seduced by an old friend's mistress. Finally, 'The Marquise of O' (1976) is a period drama set during the Franco-Prussian war, about a young woman who becomes pregnant even though she has not slept with a man since her husband's death two years previously.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

143 of 148 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 18 May 2006
Format: DVD
Eric Rohmer's films have few characters, usually concentrating on a single human drama dissected in minute detail. But all the introspection is very human, it brings out the anguish, there is nothing cerebral about his films. His highly intelligent dialogue enables actors to submerge themselves in their characters bringing them intensely alive. Rohmer maintains visual interest with fine street and café locations around Paris, and eschews background music.

AVIATORS WIFE (1981) - the first or Rohmer's series on "Comedies and Proverbs" is one day in the life of Anne (Marie Riviere) single and twenty five pining over a failed love affair and ambivalent about her twenty year old student boyfriend Francoise (Philippe Marlaud) who believes she is cheating on him.

The aviator is Christian (Mathieu Carriere) and his wife is an absent role. Christian calls on Anne to tell her their affair is finally over and is seen leaving by Francoise.

LOVE IN THE AFTERNOON (1972) - Frederic (Bernard Verley) is contentedly married to the cool but affectionate Helene (Francoise Verley) and likes her that way. He is a man that finds companionship in the midst of a crowd, say on a bus train or street, likes feeling an anonymous part of an anonymous whole. In company he likes reading, even of an evening with his wife. He likes to imagine affairs with women he passes in the street, feeling safe in the knowledge that nothing can happen.

Then suddenly the tantalising Chloe (Zouzou), the lover of a past friend, comes back into his life tempting him into a tentative affair making Frederic examine his life.
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47 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Mykool on 6 Mar. 2007
Format: DVD
This collection gave me a lot of pleasure (apart from Marquis of O which I haven't managed to finish yet despite several attempts.)Yes, his films are all talk but if you value strong characterisation in films you will be drawn in - more like televised plays in their intimacy than cinema. They're very modern films - his characters are basically good people trying to find, or create, values to live by often thwarted by their own selfishness and loneliness. The Green Ray is probably the best with a tremendously intense central performance; Pauline at the Beach is everyone's memory of the golden summer you think you once had, and I also loved The Good Marriage - the ultimate film of how men and women don't really understand each other. My Girlfriend's boyfriend (much better in French "L'ami de mon amie")is set in the "new" suburb of Cergy-Pontoise, clean, carefully designed and somehow, completely soulless. You get a sense of people trying to forge relationships without any real sense of roots or community - very contemporary though it was made in the 80s. Some of the extras are quite illuminating with Rohmer explaining the thinking behind the shooting of some scenes.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By schumann_bg TOP 50 REVIEWER on 8 Feb. 2012
Format: DVD
This box set offers the greatest imaginable pleasure one could have from eight films, each of which is a masterpiece in my opinion, except possibly Le beau mariage, but then that one is just as good as the others really, and cannot be faulted, it just has a more 'difficult' surface appropriate to the heroine's character. The pleasure in a film like L'amour, l'apres-midi or L'ami de mon amie is just more obvious as you're watching. I say this, but a part of one can also be thinking 'What on earth is this supposed to be?', they are so deceptively simple; sequences can easily appear clunky, such as the dance scenes in Le beau mariage or Les nuits de la pleine lune, or the way characters dress or do their hair. Then suddenly you realise that in fact what seemed so ordinary and artless was in fact part of a carefully worked out structure, and that trifling dialogues are being used to reveal the essence of human emotion. It is this disparity between a banal-seeming surface and the intellectual rigour that underpins it that gives his films their special quality. L'amour, l'apres-midi is possibly the most moving of all Rohmer films in its final scene, and one of the most beguiling as a visual entity, whereas Pauline a la plage has the most elaborate plot involving five characters who are made to dovetail in and out of entanglements with dizzying virtuosity. It is as light as a souffle yet so exquisitely wrought; maybe a detailed model made of balsa wood gets it better ... Die Marquise von O. was his only production in German, with a wonderful performance by Bruno Ganz. It is no less than thrilling to hear the Rohmer style brought to bear on the Kleist story, and I for one love the result!Read more ›
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By G. R. Jones on 19 Oct. 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This set includes all six of Rohmer's 'Comedies et Poverbes'. As other reviewers have said, these are centred around detailed character, developed in a way that most film-makers don't give themselves time for. What I'd like to add is that the situations these characters find themelves in, while serious for them, are often comic for us - we can see what they can't, about themselves and their relationships. For me, this turns what could be quite miserable stories into something illuminating about the way in which we mistake the events and people around us. Rohmer's treatment of his characters is generally sympathetic, so we don't laugh at them - Marion in 'Pauline at the Beach' is an exception - her self centred maniplations geting her what she deserves.
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