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The Enterprise and Scrum (Best Practices) [Paperback]

Ken Schwaber
3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
Price: 24.99 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
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Book Description

16 Jun 2007 0735623376 978-0735623378 1

It’s time to extend the benefits of Scrum—greater agility, higher-quality products, and lower costs—from individual teams to your entire enterprise. However, with Scrum’s lack of prescribed rules, the friction of change can be challenging as people struggle to break from old project management habits. In this book, agile-process revolution leader Ken Schwaber takes you through change management—for your organizational and interpersonal processes—explaining how to successfully adopt Scrum across your entire organization.

A cofounder of Scrum, Ken draws from decades of experience, answering your questions through case studies of proven practices and processes. With them, you’ll learn how to adopt—and adapt—Scrum in the enterprise. And gain profound levels of transparency into your development processes.

Discover how to:

  • Evaluate the benefits of adopting Scrum in any size organization
  • Initiate an enterprise transition project
  • Implement a single, prioritized Product Backlog
  • Organize effective Scrum teams using a top-down approach
  • Adapt and apply solutions for integrating engineering practices across multiple teams
  • Shorten release times by managing high-value increments
  • Refine your Scrum practices and help reduce the length of Sprints

Frequently Bought Together

The Enterprise and Scrum (Best Practices) + Agile Project Management with Scrum (Microsoft Professional) + Agile Software Development with SCRUM
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Product details

  • Paperback: 178 pages
  • Publisher: Microsoft Press; 1 edition (16 Jun 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0735623376
  • ISBN-13: 978-0735623378
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 18.4 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 239,171 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

About the Author

A 30-year veteran of the software development industry, Ken Schwaber is a leader of the agile process revolution and one of the developers of the Scrum process. A signatory of the Agile Manifesto in 2001, he subsequently founded the Agile Alliance and the Scrum Alliance. Ken authored Agile Project Management with Scrum and coauthored Agile Software Development with Scrum and has helped train more than 47,000 certified ScrumMasters.


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Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
3.7 out of 5 stars
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing 5 Aug 2007
Format:Paperback
As a Certified ScrumMaster who has introduced Scrum to one development department (~100 staff) of a large software house I was really looking forward to this book. The most difficult aspect of our adoption of Scrum has been managing the complex dependencies between multiple teams working on a single software package - this is something that seems to be poorly understood and documented so I was very hopeful that this book would help.

Unfortunately I found it to be very short and very superficial. While these issues are covered there is little in the way of solid, practical, advice other than to "use the Scrum process" - a recurring theme of the book. With each new chapter I found myself thinking "Ah! NOW we're getting to it..." only to be disappointed.

Having read much about Scrum and having followed the process for some time, this book added nothing new for me. If you're looking for an introduction to Scrum, the author's own "Agile Software Development with SCRUM" is much better. For more general help on managing "agile" projects - including with large teams - you could do much worse than Mike Cohn's "Agile Estimating and Planning"

Very disappointing.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback
The two best things about this book are that it: (1) provides a framework for adopting Scrum across an enterprise, and (2) describes some techniques for surmounting some of the problems you will likely face as you try. Although the book is about the "enterprise and Scrum" most of the contents will be applicable to any group of teams transitioning to Scrum. A set of five teams working together on a single project would benefit from this book even if they are not the whole enterprise.

Too many agile books suffer from being targeted at a single team working on a deserted island--that is, a seven-person team with no issues outside their one team. This book does not suffer from that problem. Want to know how to organize work on a project that is partitioned by architectural layer? How to structure a product backlog for the entire organization? Or how to organize teams across a large project? Or what are the proper reporting relationships on a large Scrum project? This book provides sage advice on these enterprise adoption issues and more.

The book is chock-full of real-life anecdotes (in which only the name of the company and key players have been changed). Each anecdote illustrates how one real company dealt with a real problem. Their problem, their context, and their solution won't exactly be yours, but seeing how others have addressed challenges can be illuminating in thinking how to address yours.

This is probably not your best choice as a first book on Scrum. For that start with the author's other two books. This book picks up where they left off, providing a wealth of information for enterprises and even workgroups adopting Scrum. If you're already familiar with the basics of Scrum, and especially if you are starting to hit the hard points of adopting it and spreading it through your organization then this book is for you.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good 24 Feb 2013
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
It seems to be updated version of Agile Project Management with Scrum (Microsoft Professional). After three years author gives you more detailed information on SCRUM. Full of use cases from different companies. Just by reading you may avoid common mistakes!
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Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  11 reviews
75 of 83 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars don't waste your time 14 July 2007
By a reader - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I read this book based on Mike Cohn's recommendation. However, I was extremely disappointed in it.

The book starts out telling you what to do to manage Scrum throughout an enterprise. The only problem is the approach given assumes the entire enterprise has embraced using Scrum. I have never seen this. The real problem is typically getting the enterprise to embrace Scrum. The book gives little insight in how to do this. Integrating processes across teams and how to get organizations that work in competition with each other now to cooperate is pretty much ignored.

The rest of the book poses problems and tells you what you need to do, but rarely tells you how to do it. Most often, we are simply told to let the team figure it out. Sort of like a financial analyst telling you - "what you have to do is figure out how to buy stocks when they are low, and then sell them when the stocks go higher." Uh, OK, but _how_ do I do that? The book doesn't quite ever tell us.

The book also tells us about how the core of a system can become dead and tells us we have to stop this. But how? No advice is given on how to write tests or quality code or how to do integration across an Enterprise. In fact, almost nothing about writing code exists in the book. It's as if by following process entirely we can solve all of our problems with code quality, tests, integration, etc ...

My experience with Scrum teams and management is that you must give them reasons to expand Scrum beyond the team or you must explain to them how Scrum can scale when technical problems exist. How do you manage designs across multiple teams? How do you ensure re-use of common modules? How do you manage the dependencies between teams? These are all good questions which go both unasked and unanswered.

I'll admit that I didn't finish the book. After reading about 2/3rds through it I skimmed the rest because it didn't look like any value was coming forward from it.

Two books that I find much more useful are Scaling Software Agility: Best Practices for Large Enterprises by Dean Leffingwell and Agile Software Development in the Large: Diving Into the Deep by Jutta Eckstein
16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The book is more like an informal set of lecture notes written for a presentation 28 July 2008
By Qiulang - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I built up a lot of expectation before reading this book because I learned a lot from the author's earlier book "Agile Project Management With Scrum" and not to mention that the author was the cofounder of scrum. But after I read it I was rather disappointed. I feel like the book is more like an informal set of lecture notes written for a presentation in stead of a well written and well thought book.

Before I further comment about that let me first take a guess about why people want to read a technical book. I think most people want to read a technical book because they hope the book can teach them something new. And if the reading process makes readers entertained that will make the book even more valuable. And that was what I got from "Agile Project Management With Scrum". But technical reading mostly does not get that luxury so long as the book is informative (and enlightened) we will say the time and energy spent for it is well worth.

So back to this book, I think before reading it every one will know that running scrum in a traditional waterfall process company is hard. What we want to know is how hard that it is. What kind of (typical) situation we may run into; what kind of specific issue we need to address and what was the author's way or suggestion to tackle them. But the author just kept saying that it is hard but you got to stick with scrum then finally you will make it. The author kept repeating that without even giving a valuable suggestion for it (putting the obstacles into transition backlog can't really be counted as a valuable suggestion). And the examples he gave were also superficial, i.e. repeating that you will make it finally without giving any valuable suggestion about how.

The second part of the book is about the practice using in the enterprise. But except for suggesting the use of scrum of scrum, which again readers will anticipate before reading the book and checking your burn down chart to know your productivity I still do not see any thing new or enlightened, although the example the author gave here were a little bit more impressive than the examples gave in the first part.

The third part of the book was the worst. The third part is about the introduction of scrum, the kind of materials you can find all over the internet. I even found that the author copies pasted some of paragraphs in his previous book "Agile Project Management With Scrum".

I do not mean to be harsh and the author is really some person I look up to. So maybe he was talking about something totally beyond my level and I hope anyone can point that out for me.
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The next step in Scrum applications... 30 Nov 2007
By Matthew D Edwards - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
An add-on to the existing two SCRUM books by Schwaber. This book discusses how to evolve an enterprise collectively rather than just parts of it at a time. You'll likely have no context for this book unless having first read the others. Note: this book is, like the others, descriptive in nature and definitively not prescriptive. So if you're looking for someone to tell you exactly `how' to do something, this isn't it.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars scrum in large projects - the guide 25 Dec 2007
By Chris Louvion - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I recently run a large project (~100 people) under a structure very similar to the organization described by Ken in this book:
-one product: a large web site
-8 scrum teams: 6 service teams, 1 IT team, 1 CM team
-scrum of scrum: team composed of senior engineers from each scrum focused on global code integration, standard / API definitions, run by uber scrum master and uber product owner
-meta scrum: team composed of local scrum masters (problem raisers) and executives (problem solvers) focused on organizational issues, run by uber scrum master

The results?
-a product delivered within a deadline of 18 weeks (the last product of similar size and complexity was delivered in 18 months and was mostly unsuccessful)
-a very happy product owner (financial outcome better than expected, all key features delivered)
-best quality software ever written in the company (best as from a technical debt perspective, and great architecture paradigm)
-fantastic morale in the team

This book is written for people that understand scrum and are ready to think it to the next level. It clearly outlines a simple and powerful framework to roll out scrum across the enterprise and achieve great coordination in scalable manner in large projects. This is not an "enterprise scrum". It is the same scrum applied to the enterprise.
Some might miss details on tactical implementation which the book doesn't try to address. Why? I think because it is scrum and details have been written about over and over. So how do you attack your big impediments? Run Ken's framework and let it to the self-organization of the teams! It is scrum after all.
28 of 38 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent resource for any large group adopting Scrum 28 Jun 2007
By Michael Cohn - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
The two best things about this book are that it: (1) provides a framework for adopting Scrum across an enterprise, and (2) describes some techniques for surmounting some of the problems you will likely face as you try. Although the book is about the "enterprise and Scrum" most of the contents will be applicable to any group of teams transitioning to Scrum. A set of five teams working together on a single project would benefit from this book even if they are not the whole enterprise.

Too many agile books suffer from being targeted at a single team working on a deserted island--that is, a seven-person team with no issues outside their one team. This book does not suffer from that problem. Want to know how to organize work on a project that is partitioned by architectural layer? How to structure a product backlog for the entire organization? Or how to organize teams across a large project? Or what are the proper reporting relationships on a large Scrum project? This book provides sage advice on these enterprise adoption issues and more.

The book is chock-full of real-life anecdotes (in which only the name of the company and key players have been changed). Each anecdote illustrates how one real company dealt with a real problem. Their problem, their context, and their solution won't exactly be yours, but seeing how others have addressed challenges can be illuminating in thinking how to address yours.

This is probably not your best choice as a first book on Scrum. For that start with the author's other two books. This book picks up where they left off, providing a wealth of information for enterprises and even workgroups adopting Scrum. If you're already familiar with the basics of Scrum, and especially if you are starting to hit the hard points of adopting it and spreading it through your organization then this book is for you.
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