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The End of Politics: New Labour and the Folly of Managerialism Hardcover – 25 Apr 2007


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Harriman House Publishing (25 April 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1905641176
  • ISBN-13: 978-1905641178
  • Product Dimensions: 16.6 x 3.1 x 23.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 898,031 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

About the Author

Chris Dillow was educated at Oxford and Manchester Universities, and spent several years as an economist in the City, before becoming economics writer at the Investors Chronicle. He blogs at http://stumblingandmumbling.typepad.com

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A. I. Mackenzie VINE VOICE on 22 Mar. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Although this is ostensibly about New Labour, the cult of managerialism has spread throughout the business world as well. So the critique actually goes much wider than the sub title implies and includes the current coalition government.

The central thesis of this book is that managerialism says that all competing values can be managed away, thus efficiency and fairness need not compete but can both be harnessed together.

Chris Dillow cuts through this with gusto, he's of an analytic bent so provides lots of figures and graphs to demonstrate that Politics and indeed all management involves choosing what your primary goal is. That you have to choose between efficiency and fairness for example. They are incompatible

He's also very good at pointing out that central managers lack information in principle to make good decisions and that concepts like efficiency and equality are not as simple as you may think. It takes a more philosophical tone in the later part of the book and in fact I've come to believe that what underlies political belief is an idea of what a good human life is (a philosophical idea).

So there's a lot of meat in this book, well worth reading. Chris also has a blog which is called Stumbling and Mumbling, which is worth a look if you like this book.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Political Science Student on 24 Nov. 2008
Format: Hardcover
I enjoyed Dillow's book very much. It is a consistent and creative approach to the central question, and it is a pleasure to read a book where the author is so clearly engaged with, and passionate about, the subject.

My only caveat would concern the book's intended audience. For an interested layperson, the pitch is perfect: the book is an engaging whistlestop tour through economics, history, philosophy, politics, and much besides. However, I suspect the academic reader will find the occasionally scattergun approach frustrating (the chapters have, according to the preface, arisen fairly independently, and can be read in any order, which slightly disrupts the flow of the argument). In addition, Dillow brushes over some fairly major areas of academic debate - necessary, but occasionally unsatisfying.

Overall, this is an excellent introduction for those frustrated with the current turn of political discourse, and provides a good springboard for further reading for those more engaged with the topic.
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6 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mr. J. Kimmitt on 4 May 2007
Format: Hardcover
You obviously haven't read Chris Dillow's book or you'd understand that there are important distinctions between managerialism and triangulation. Triangulation is a component of manageralism but it is not it in its totality.
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3 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Frankiewood on 26 April 2007
Format: Hardcover
It seems pretty strange that another book called "The End of Politics. Triangulation and the Battle for the Centre Ground" was published last year and argued a very similar point. It's been a while, but I remember that the authors (Stanly and Lees, I think) argued Labour's pioneering use of "Triangulation" (a strategic form of managerialism, I guess) had damaged the essentials of political debate and harmed the main parties's capacity to respond effectively to pressing social problems like inner city depravation. It ended pretty strongly by urging a revaluation of the views of government and society which underpin modern politicla thought and by suggesting that a bigger role needs to be givne to social co-operation.

It would be odd if Chris Dillow hadn't read Stanley and Lees's book, especially given the wierd similarity between their titles, and this would be worrying. If Dillow hasn't, however, he probably should. It might have saved him some trouble.
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