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The End of Politics and the Birth of iDemocracy Paperback – 2 Oct 2012

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Product details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Biteback Publishing (2 Oct. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849544220
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849544221
  • Product Dimensions: 13.5 x 2 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 231,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

Review

Terrifying in its diagnosis, thrilling in its prognosis, Douglas Carswell s radical, clear-sighted and subversive book is an illuminating glimpse of how the West urgently must and still can escape death by top-down bureaucratic suffocation. --Matt Ridley, author of The Rational Optimist

Carswell puts his finger on the key dilemmas of the age. A fascinating read from a refreshing and independent Conservative voice. --Boris Johnson

A challenging proposition but he argues it robustly. Let s pray he is right. --Frederick Forsyth

as a revolutionary text, Carswell's is right up there with the Communist Manifesto --Sunday Times Culture

Quietly, a battle for the soul of the Conservative party rages and Carswell is on the intellectual frontline. --Progress Online

"a passionately expressed set of arguments about why our current political arrangements do not work." --Charles Moore, Daily Telegraph

Quietly, a battle for the soul of the Conservative party rages and Carswell is on the intellectual frontline. --Progress Online

About the Author

DOUGLAS CARSWELL is a prolific writer, blogger and commentator. He was elected to Parliament in 2005 and Parliamentarian of the Year by readers of the Spectator. Douglas blogs each day at TalkCarswell.com and has written for the Guardian, Financial Times, Sunday Times, Mail on Sunday, News of the World, Daily Telegraph and Spectator.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By SSP on 3 Nov. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a great book which explains what on earth is going on in the world of politics in the West. I, like many others, am disillusioned with politicians and sometimes feel that there is no hope to fix the system. Carswell not only highlights all the issues, but also explains that politics really is changing due to pressure that citizens are applying by networking together and bypassing government entirely. This glimmer of hope made me happier! It is also very timely, it complements a fantastic documentary that I recently watched on YouTue called "97% owned - Director's Cut". This documentary in a nutshell is the first part of Carswell's book. I recommend watching that documentary as well as reading this book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By D. White on 8 Nov. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
This book provides us with the essential basis for a real change in political thinking.
If the thought of a free people with opinions frightens you, its not for you, but if you are willing to start again with a clean sheet then take heart there are others like you!.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sam on 13 Dec. 2012
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Douglas Carswell's book, "The End of Politics and the Birth of iDemocracy" points out on page 14 that in 1900 American and British households spent 5-15% of their earnings on the government, compared to 43-51% today. On pages 1-13, he explains:

"In 2010, the American government spent $1,900 billion more than it collected in tax. A year later, the US government borrowed $100 billion each month just to pay the bills. ... Against ... $70,000 annual income, every American is liable for $131,368 of public debt, plus a further $1,031,131 to pay for all those unfunded promises their government has made. If you thought America was mired in debt, take a look at Britain and Europe. Britain's total public and private debts are proportionately even bigger at more than 5 times her entire annual economic output. In Spain, France and Italy, total debt is between 3-4 times annual output. Public debt in Greece is 132% output, Italy 111%, France 90%, Ireland 85%, Germany 83% ... the interest payments on the debt begin to grow faster than they can be paid back.

"Greece, Italy, Spain and Portugal have reached this stage ... private lenders have stopped lending to them. Other countries [themselves heavily in debt] have had to step in to bail them out. The US government debt interest bill already means that every US citizen faces the equivalent of $11,000 in interest payments alone each year. ... governments begin to confiscate ever more wealth to pay ... For every $100 that the average American worker earns, $36 is spent on buying government - $29 directly in various payroll taxes and $7 in various consumption taxes ... In Britain, the average worker buys £46 of government for every £100 earned. In Japan, it is Y33 for every Y100 earned. In France and Germany ...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Hex Austen on 29 Jan. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Douglas Carswell has written a superb book analysing and explaining previous political and societal structure and explains how the internet is changing traditional perceptions.

The end of politics as we have known it to now signifies the end of an age of traditional pyramidic hierarchical power. It IS the end of an Age and with it has come Judgment Day, accompanied by a monster call Transparency. Historically and traditionally the bloke at the top has been the one who restricts and controls information to the masses.

The Digital Age (the new age) has turned this upside down and now anyone can get hold of any information. The new political age will be one of iDemocracy. Social networking sites are the 'voice on the street' - and smart politicians will realise the full value of a properly worked and interactive Facebook or Twitter page. Currently a lot of mps use them as Fansites - they do so at their peril.

Douglas compliments this also by reminding the reader how personalised the internet is for the user and that in the future it is not inconceivable to have personalised profiles with personalised medical care, finances, even employment. I hope very much that Whitehall is listening to this man - and closely. Carswell blows apart traditional thought. His book is consistent, unbiased and full of commonsense and easy to understand prose.

If you want to understand the shift in our world, read this book.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By D. M. Cooper on 28 Oct. 2012
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I have reviewed "The End Of Politics..." at greater length on my own blogsite, hopefully accessible from here via my username, so I'll be brief with a few extracts from that review here.

The first seven chapters cover "The End". It is a fair portrayal of how and why our current political system is rotten to the core. The political class are portrayed as knowing full well what they are doing, probably only wanting to be sure they see their time out before the consequences of their actions catch up. It is perhaps not surprising that one commentator has already suggested that in days gone by, someone from within who exposed the true nature of how we are overtaxed, overregulated, overgoverned, badly governed and governed by the wrong people (EU bureaucrats, the opinion forming elite etc) would probably have been burned at the stake.

The second half, "The Birth", suggests that the digital revolution will render the Big Government model obsolete, as choice displaces top down prescription. "A cultural revolution is coming that will unseat the constructivist elite", it is suggested, where taxpayers decide to buy less prescribed government services, make more of their own decisions and keep more of their own money for this purpose, all aided by technology.

All in all, a very bold and challenging promotion of how the future government of the UK need not merely comprise management of decline. Provided that the current political class accepts that the days of Big Government are over. Will it? Is this a case of the irresistible force meeting the immoveable object?

Hopefully the author's conclusion, that our best days lie ahead and that we will be healthier, wealthier and happier in several generations' time after Big Government has been laid to rest, will be borne out without too much of a crash. In the meantime, a well deserved five stars for spelling it all out.
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