Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Emergency: Neutral Ireland 1939-45 Hardcover – Unabridged, 17 Mar 2006


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover, Unabridged
"Please retry"
£20.67


Product details

  • Hardcover: 424 pages
  • Publisher: Macmillan; 1 edition (17 Mar 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1405000104
  • ISBN-13: 978-1405000109
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 3.5 x 23.4 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,458,809 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'Erudite and stimulating…impressive research' -- Sunday Tribune

'Girvin’s story is one of brinkmanship and political poker' -- Scotland on Sunday

'especially excellent in its depiction of shuttle diplomacy involving de Valera and the Americans' -- Scotland on Sunday

'his rigorous study is a fresh, well-argued, agenda-setting discussion of its subject' -- Scotland on Sunday

Book Description

Brian Girvin has written a fresh and original history of Ireland between 1939 and 1945. Drawing on new sources and recent scholarship, he tells the story of what is known as ‘The Emergency’ in Ireland, but elsewhere as the Second World War. Despite Ireland still being a member of the Commonwealth, Eamon de Valera refused to join the war against Nazi Germany and declared his country neutral. To the endless frustration and anger of Churchill – and later Roosevelt – de Valera pursued an isolationist policy that changed the course of Irish domestic and foreign politics. In this brilliantly argued account, Girvin shows how this policy went against the national interest, and far from being the only option for the Government, was simply the only one they would consider. This decision, Girvin concludes, cost de Valera his ultimate prize: a united Ireland. Woven into this political maelstrom are the stories of the people who lived through those difficult years. Bold, fearless and compelling, The Emergency is a unique and important addition to any understanding of Ireland and the Second World War.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
1
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By MarkK TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 31 Oct 2008
Format: Paperback
Though officially neutral during the Second World War, Ireland still faced the consequences of the conflict. The war was an everyday presence, as thousands of men left to enlist in Britain or work in the war industries, while those who remained behind coped with rationing and the stifling policies of a government studiously determined to avoid any sort of commitment whatsoever. In this book, Brian Girvin provides an overview of these years, one that demonstrates well the strains the Irish government and the Irish people faced during this time.

Girvin's focus in these pages is on the political and diplomatic history of the period. Only one chapter looks at the broader social aspects of the conflict, and that one is a study of those Irish who enlisted in the British military. The rest offer a detailed and dry description of the Irish government's determined effort to remain neutral despite the enormous political pressure brought to bear on it, particularly by Britain and the United States. While useful as an up-to-date description of Ireland's sometimes tortuous efforts to navigate a safe path between the two sides, for a fuller picture of the Irish wartime experience it should be read in conjunction with Clair Wills's excellent That Neutral Island: A Cultural History of Ireland During the Second World War, which describes the broader social and cultural impact of the war on the Emerald Isle.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I bought this book second hand on Amazon.co.uk and it arrived to me in excellent condition. Apart from the condition of the book it was exactly the book I was looking for and it helped me to no end to fill some of the gaps in Irish history I was not even aware of.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 1 review
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
A dry overview of Irish politics during World War II 31 Oct 2008
By MarkK - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Though officially neutral during the Second World War, Ireland still faced the consequences of the conflict. The war was an everyday presence, as thousands of men left to enlist in Britain or work in the war industries, while those who remained behind coped with rationing and the stifling policies of a government studiously determined to avoid any sort of commitment whatsoever. In this book, Brian Girvin provides an overview of these years, one that demonstrates well the strains the Irish government and the Irish people faced during this time.

Girvin's focus in these pages is on the political and diplomatic history of the period. Only one chapter looks at the broader social aspects of the conflict, and that one is a study of those Irish who enlisted in the British military. The rest offer a detailed and dry description of the Irish government's determined effort to remain neutral despite the enormous political pressure brought to bear on it, particularly by Britain and the United States. While useful as an up-to-date description of Ireland's sometimes tortuous efforts to navigate a safe path between the two sides, for a fuller picture of the Irish wartime experience it should be read in conjunction with Clair Wills's excellent That Neutral Island: A Cultural History of Ireland During the Second World War, which describes the broader social and cultural impact of the war on the Emerald Isle.
Was this review helpful? Let us know


Feedback