£26.00
FREE Delivery in the UK.
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Emergence of a Scientific Culture: Science and the Shaping of Modernity 1210-1685 Paperback – 23 Oct 2008


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
£26.00
£22.54 £22.48

Frequently Bought Together

The Emergence of a Scientific Culture: Science and the Shaping of Modernity 1210-1685 + The Collapse of Mechanism and the Rise of Sensibility: Science and the Shaping of Modernity, 1680-1760
Price For Both: £49.40

Buy the selected items together


Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

Gaukroger's book is a historical reconstruction that brackets historical context (social, practical, political etc.) and offers a plethora of studies on intellectual history on a variety of subjects that deserve attention in any investigation of the emergence of the scientific culture of the West. (Wolfgang Lefèvre ISIS d)

The thesis of his substanial and impreesive book is that Christianity indeed played a major, not, as often proposed, through the dissociation of science from religious concerns, but through a reconstituted partnership between Christianity and (a reconstructed) natural philosophy...I am not aware of any other treatment of these themes that combines so magisterially a discerning account of changing boundaries between disciplines with a dispassionate analysis of the changing relations between theology and the sciences. The result is a scholarly exploration on a grand scale. (John Hedley Brooke British Journal for the History of Science)

Gaukroger's book is a historical context (social, practical, political, etc.) and offers a plethora of studies in intellectual history on a variety of subjects that deserve attention in any investigation of the emergence of the scientidic culture of the West. (Wolfgang Lefèvre ISIS)

This impressive and wide-ranging book is the first of a quintet devoted to the question: how in the (Western) world did all cognitive values come to be associated with scientific ones?... Gaukroger's grand beginning of an even grander five-volume narrative is an exceptional book. Its structure of scientific authority, as it were, is certain to stimulate long and lively discussions among academics of every stripe. (Michael H. Shank, Renaissance Quarterly)

[A] substantial and impressive book...I am not aware of any other treatment of these themes that combines so magisterially a discerning account of changing boundaries between disciplines with a dispassionate analysis of the changing relations between theology and the sciences. The result is a scholarly exploration on the grand scale. (John Hedley Brooke, British Journal for the History of Science)

About the Author

Stephen Gaukroger has a BA (Philosophy) from the University of London and a Ph.D (History and Philosophy of Science) from the University of Cambridge. He was Research Fellow in the Philosophy of Science, Clare Hall, Cambridge, 1977-1978; Research Fellow, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Melbourne, 1978-1980. Since 1981 he has been in the Philosophy Department at the University of Sydney where he is currently Professor of History of Philosophy and History of Science.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 3 reviews
18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
A complete history of "Natural Philosophy" 13 July 2009
By Giuseppe Tulli - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This work can be read as the history, or evolution, of "Natural Philosophy", from it's almost total obliteration by Christianity, and specifically, Augustine, to the Scientific Revolution up to Newton.
Even under the wealth of information and extraordinary scholarship, characteristic already of the work of Dr. Gaukroger, and the sheer massiveness of the work, focus on the main theme is sustained throughout with inexhaustable intensity.
By following the evolution of Natural Philosophy side by side with Theology and Metaphysics, as this work does, we also gain a better understanding of how the latter have taken their specific Western form.
Of the Scientific Revolution properly, there's no more complete rendering that I'm aware of. The origin of Mechanism, for instance, which Dr. Gaukroger explains so clearly in his books on Descartes, is here developed into a deeper, more contextual meaning, given it's being entrenched in fact in the conflict between Christian Theology and the nascent Natural Philosophy.
This work is the first of a series, and in the true spirit of Gibbon, namely, of giving as full, complete and as objective an account can be of a specific "time" or "epoch" in history. This book proves that we have today distance enough to give such an account, and so to have a complete understanding of our being "modern".
8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
excellent book, but WOW, there are an astounding number of typos 30 Mar 2010
By Keith D. Houck - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fascinating work. Can't wait to see the next volume when it comes out. Was surprised at the large number of typographical errors in a product from Oxford University (Clarendon) Press, though.
Best intellectual history of early-modern scientific modernity 23 Oct 2014
By W. J. Reedy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
A splendid, wide-ranging treatment of many aspects and thinkers in the science and philosophy of this broad transitional era. However, I think his commentary on Nicholas Malebranche could have been deepened had he assimilated the analysis in Michael E. Hobart fine study of that Cartesian theologian.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback