The Emergence of Memory: Conversations with W.G. Sebald and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Trade in your item
Get a £0.23
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Emergence of Memory: Conversations with W. G. Sebald Hardcover – 10 Feb 2008

7 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£274.31 £59.09


Free One-Day Delivery for six months with Amazon Student


Product details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: SEVEN STORIES PRESS; 1st edition (10 Feb. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1583227857
  • ISBN-13: 978-1583227855
  • Product Dimensions: 14.6 x 1.9 x 21.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 904,491 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

W. G. Sebald was born in Wertach im Allgäu, in the Bavarian Alps, in 1944. He studied German language and literature in Freiburg, Switzerland and Manchester. In 1966 he took up a position as an assistant lecturer at the University of Manchester, settling permanently in England in 1970. He was professor of Modern German Literature at the University of East Anglia, and is the author of The Emigrants which won the Berlin Literature Prize, the Literatur Nord Prize and the Johannes Bobrowski Medal, The Rings of Saturn and Austerlitz. W. G. Sebald died in 2001.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 54 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Cunliffe TOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 26 Feb. 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
When W G Sebald died in a car accident in 2001, after publishing just four books, his readers felt both a huge sense of loss, and also a sense of irony, that such a melancholic, perceptive writer should have come to an end quite so synchronistic with his writings. It seemed so appropriate that his disjointed, somehow incomplete literary wanderings should come to an abrupt end, leaving so many questions hanging in the wind. All great works of literature either found a genre or dissolve one (Walter Benjamin, quoted in the book under review), and Sebald's books are quite unique, baring a resemblance to nothing which has gone before, and almost certainly being followed by no book quite like them. Sebald creates thoughts in us which are entirely our own, as though discovering something which has always been there, but unrecognised until the convoluted prose of Sebald has penetrated into out own depths to release something precious from its swirling eddies.

For those who still hunger after more Sebald, this book fits the bill very well. A collection of essays and interviews with Sebald, it fills in many gaps, offering assistance to those who ask the questions:

- Are these novels or reflective travelogues?
- Are the characters Sebald meets real or imagined (or perhaps composite)?
- Who is the narrator?
- What is the meaning of the photographs?
- Are the photographs genuine illustrations of the events in the books?
- What is the relationship of the books to the Holocaust?

Sebald gave several in-depth interviews, the transcriptions of which are included in this book, and he seemed quite happy to talk about his work, its meaning and its influences.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Brinkman on 30 Mar. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book of interviews and essays complements Sebald's work really well. It is not just an advertising/publishing piece of marketing but it examines different aspects of his work, and not always in a complimentary way. As an admirer of Sebald, I can recommend the book to people who have already read at least some of his works. It isn't an introduction to him, rather an afterword to his life's work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Karen on 17 Oct. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have yet to finish this book. It is a good read for those who have read a lot of W G Sebald as the interviews put a little more definition to the background of story and writer.
I found the transcriptions of interviews with the writer enjoyable as I did the introduction. One or two of those critiquing Sebald were, I felt, in a personal competition to be more clever than the author.
I would recommend this book
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By MJ on 17 Feb. 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Useful collection of interviews and reviews giving a good insight into Max Sebald, helping put his works into context. Interesting range of contributors bringing differing and thought-provoking perspectives.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again


Feedback