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The Economics of Enough: How to Run the Economy as If the Future Matters Hardcover – 6 Mar 2011


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press; 1st Edition edition (6 Mar. 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691145180
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691145181
  • Product Dimensions: 3.2 x 16.5 x 23.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 549,450 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

Product Description

Review


One of The Globalist's Top Books of 2012


"In The Economics of Enough, Ms. Coyle adds a knowledgeable and earnest voice to the discussion about how to face these global challenges. . . . Ms. Coyle has written a thoughtful, sprawling work. I was impressed with both the magnitude of the subject matter and her keen grasp of it. . . . Ms. Coyle has made an important contribution to the debate on the nature of global capitalism."--Nancy F. Koehn, New York Times



"If widely read, [The Economics of Enough] could be the twenty-first century's basic action manual. Like the best political philosophers, Coyle does not merely present the gritty reality of politics (or political economy, in this case), but gives us a roadmap out of our collective swamp. . . . [T]he book is a small wonder."--Joel Campbell, International Affairs



"If Diane Coyle had written The Economics of Enough a year or so earlier, a British political party would probably have laid claim to its message during the general election campaign. Coyle's work manages to tie up fiscal policy, inequality and the environment with reflection on civil society. . . . Coyle makes a particularly effective assault on the view, often espoused by environmentalists, that economic growth ought not to be a policy goal. While she calls for other objectives--and the use of a greater range of economic indicators--she backs output growth as an objective. . . . [A] solid guide to the challenges that face governments in the coming years."--Christopher Cook, Financial Times



"[Coyle's] insistence that the crisis is essentially one of trust and governance is important--and increasingly relevant as we watch our leaders failing to tame our reckless financial overlords."--Fred Pearce, Independent



"Coyle's book is . . . a very welcome supplement to the current dearth of smart, broad, readable economic literature now available. . . . Coyle's book demonstrates her to be a political economist of the old school, concerned with economics as a truly social science rather than an abstract mass of numbers. As such, her work merits a much broader audience than it is likely to find in our contemporary political climate."--Matthew Kaul, Englewood Review of Books



"Are we bankrupt? Are countries like the US and the UK in as much fiscal trouble as Ireland or Greece? The bond markets say no: they've been quite content to lend to the UK and the US as though they were low-risk propositions, and perhaps they are right. But even if bond holders look safe enough, citizens may not be. Diane Coyle, author of a new book, The Economics of Enough, argues that we need to go beyond traditional measures of debt in thinking about future obligations."--Tim Harford, Financial Times



"Designed for readers well versed in economics, this book offers an in-depth economic analysis that often supports arguments with philosophical and sociological theories."--Caroline Geck, Library Journal



"A grim view of the economic future and suggestions on how to sway the outcome, one penny at a time. In this highly informed analysis, British economist Coyle (The Soulful Science: What Economists Really Do and Why It Matters, 2007, etc.) posits as a given that 'more money makes people happier because it means they can buy more.' . . . There's much to digest here, so the author's tendency to repeat herself turns out to be helpful. Tough trekking but well worth the journey for this top-rank economist's view from the summit."--Kirkus Reviews



"There is much good sense in The Economics of Enough, and Coyle writes efficiently and clearly."--Howard Davies, Times Higher Education



"There is much good thinking and plenty of good ideas in [T]he Economics of Enough. For many readers, the book will be a revelation in just how far we have moved from economics as a 'dismal science.' For the business reader, Coyle opens up a range of broader perspectives that will on the one hand challenge the neo-classical economic purist and, on the other, will encourage those who want their children to have more than a dismal future, to do something about it."--Roger Steare, Management Today



"[A] compelling call to action. . . . [T]his is a powerful, thought-provoking and timely contribution to the debate on the evolving shape of society."--Dimitri Zenghelis, Nature Climate Change



"From the somewhat playful Sex, Drugs, and Economics, to the more descriptive and objective The Soulful Science, economist and superb writer (too often mutually exclusive categories) Coyle presents her more general assessment in The Economics of Enough. Blending economics with politics and philosophy, she uses the recent financial crisis as an opportunity to discuss a number of grander themes with the goal of a better and sustainable future, which is to be aided and abetted by a better-informed citizenry led not by an invisible hand but by the fist of more enlightened government."--Choice



"The Economics of Enough is a thoughtful and reflective piece addressing the interplay between governments and markets in a 'post-financial crisis' world. . . . The book serves as a good foil for deeper discussions of the implications and results of the attempt to govern complex systems--both political and economic--fraught with their inevitable webs of adverse selection, moral hazard, and self-interest."--Bradley K Hobbs, EH.Net

From the Back Cover


"Unlike many economists, Diane Coyle is a worldly philosopher! This nuanced book provides an illuminating analysis of the key debate over whether free market growth translates into improvements in our quality of life."--Matthew E. Kahn, University of California, Los Angeles


"This is a fine and interesting book with plenty of wise observations and good economic analysis. Diane Coyle is a terrific writer and an economist of real insight."--Edward Glaeser, Harvard University


"Diane Coyle has written a lively and challenging examination of the state of economic policymaking following the recent financial crisis."--Nicholas Crafts, Warwick University



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3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. J. Roarty on 10 July 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This timely book explores all aspects of sustainability: economic, environmental and social. The underlying theme pursued throughout the book is that economic growth, whilst bringing significant benefits to society, can no longer continue in its present form. Indeed, by ignoring social and natural limits, it has become unsustainable. The Economics of Enough is a devastating critique of recent economic policymaking that has been driven by political parties prepared to win votes by offering short-term solutions to long-term problems.

The book carefully reviews a vast literature relating to current multiple crises concerning our deteriorating environment, growing social inequality and the mounting burden of public debt. In providing an overarching critique of the most important debates affecting Government policy on what are the critical issues of our time, the Economics of Enough draws upon all the main disciplines of the social sciences and distills the latest evidence from academic research. The enquiry ranges from the study of happiness (psychology) to the trend of growing social inequality(sociology); from the depletion of natural capital (environmental economics)to the burgeoning problem of debt(political economy).

An ambitious and bold study which should become compulsory reading for all politicians, particularly the deficit deniers. By cutting through the ill-considered and sterile arguments of populist politicians, short-term fixes are banished in favour of long-term, sustainable solutions. In this context, the current political debate about growth versus austerity offers a false prospectus; in the West, we have reached the limits of debt-fuelled growth which has turned out to be a mirage, its proponents morally as well as economically bankrupt.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Rolf Dobelli TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 10 July 2012
Format: Hardcover
Economist Diane Coyle argues that the 2007-2008 financial crisis was not an isolated event but a symptom of greater issues in the global economy. The forces driving these issues include social progress, climate change and technology, particularly the shift to a knowledge- and service-based economy. In this impressive, strikingly honest book, Coyle works hard to avoid clichéd binaries (left versus right, market versus government) and to base her analysis on research and observation. Some of her insights are useful, and her section on measurement is nicely original. However, her overall call for action is not as fresh, practical or persuasive as her analysis of the problems at hand. Nonetheless, getAbstract recommends this earnest work of economic inquiry to executives, policy makers and all those who believe that having an ethical society remains a viable goal.
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By DotingDad on 10 May 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
More enjoyable than a lot of economics books. But that inevitably means being more opinionated.

Though I did not always agree with Coyle, he makes coherent arguments. And I read more than I expected to be be honest. That is why I think it deserves four stars.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Don't be fooled by the fancy cover and inner sleeve reviews. This book is surprisingly disappointing.

It is difficult to read because of the author's style. She writes in an opinionated right-wing voice, in poorly structured repetitive chapters, cherry picking evidence to draw her preconceived conclusions and often making judgements with no evidence at all. For example, in chapter 2 she says:
"...there is an off-putting air of smugness in some of this recession-chic literature. Much of it is written by people who are themselves well off by any standard, and yet they obviously get great satisfaction from circumstances that mean many people are struggling to make ends meet. It's as if homespun is morally superior to something bought for money."
She intersperses her discussions with rather pointless photos, instead of well analysed charts as other authors in this area do, and comes across with the idea that her view and analysis is the "proper" one. There are big holes in most of the chapters - the arguments are oversimplified and biaised toward the author's opinion.
For a more balanced and scientifically informed discussion in this area I recommend Tim Jackson's book - "Prosperity without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet"
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By Mrs. S. Davies on 15 Nov. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
a present for someone
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