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The Eagle's Prey Hardcover – 5 Jul 2004

4.6 out of 5 stars 139 customer reviews

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Headline; First Edition edition (5 July 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0755301153
  • ISBN-13: 978-0755301157
  • Product Dimensions: 16.1 x 24 x 2.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (139 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 401,533 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

'I really don't need this kind of competition...It's a great read' Bernard Cornwell 'An engrossing storyline, full of teeth-clenching battles, political machinations, treachery, honour, love and death... More, please!' Elizabeth Chadwick 'A good, uncomplicated, rip-roaring read' Mail on Sunday 'For those who like their historical fiction to include plenty of bloody thrills and spills, Scarrow's latest book will prove irresistible' Living History --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Book Description

The fifth in this increasingly popular series sees veteran officer Macro and recently appointed centurion Cato face another challenge in their battle for control of the British Isles - 'I really don't need this kind of competition...It's a great read' Bernard Cornwell

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
In my own opinion, this - the fifth in the Eagle series of books about the adventures of Centurions Macro and Cato - is by far the best piece of Scarrow's writing to date. I admit to enjoying the first three, but felt a little let down by the fourth which I felt seemed to be inspired by Scarrow sitting down one Christmas after a healthy helping of X-mas pudding, watching the annual re-run of Zulu on the TV and then adapting it into The Eagle And The Wolves !

The book mainly concerns the aftermath of the disastrous attempt of the third cohort - under the leadership of the perpetual back-stabbing Maximius - to delay Caratacus from escaping from the main body of the legion, and ending the war with the rebellious Britain's as early as possible to keep the name of Claudius respectable in Rome.

After some serious passing of the buck by Maximius, Narcissus decides that a decimation of the legion would be best and the novel details the results, the escape of those facing death, the chase by the surviving members of the third cohort and the eventual final show down with Caratacus in the Marsh lands.

I found that when Macro and Cato's legion were facing decimation I could just not put the book down until I knew what was going to happen - and we all knew that one of our illustrious duo were going to draw the short straw.

Being a lecturer on Roman history the details of Roman society, political intrigue and army life in the legions are superbly written as usual and exactly what I have come to expect from Scarrow`s earlier novels. Scarrow's addiction to detail, mixed with adventure, political intrigue, friendship, blood and gore once again do the business for me.
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By Gareth Wilson - Falcata Times Blog TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 Jun. 2004
Format: Hardcover
This novel picks up where the previous one finished and as such doesn't contain a massive time delay between the events that unfolded and as such give the reader the opportunity to understand, perhaps a little clearer, the turbulent times in which our ancestors lived. However if your a new reader you dont have to have read the characters past excursions as each novel is self contained. As such it adds few complications that will leave you wondering as to what the hell happened and what have I missed as this doesnt make any sense.
As I discovered in the previous novel the tale is crisp, exciting and action packed and never leaves a dull moment in the whole of the book. If you love Cornwell then this is definitely an author to add to your shelves and will be one that you read time after time, more for enjoyment than anything else, but also to build your excitement for the next installment.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The perfect companion to the Eagle series is the ROMA VICTRIX WINE BEAKER Calix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker

"The Eagle's Prey" is Simon Scarrow's solid fifth volume in his "Eagle" series focused on roman military adventures in the early first century, AD. This is not the best of Scarrow's series, but it's an entertaining story of well-written action sequences held together by a reasonably solid, if not unique and totally cohesive, plot.

In "Prey", Macro and Cato are Centurions assigned to the 2nd Legion of the Roman Army. Led by Legate Vespasian (future Emperor), the 2nd is tasked with subduing native peoples in Britain in the mid first century, AD. Both are in their second seasons of campaigning on the Isle and look forward to the endgame in putting down what appears to be their primary foe in the barbarian Caratacus. Both Cato and Macro end up implicated in the 2nd's failure to contain Caratacus, and find themselves fighting an upstream battle against their superiors.

Scarrow continues his fine tradition of excellent fiction interwoven with historical accuracy, and in this latest novel continues to develop the characters of Macro and Cato in maturity, as well as in backstory, continuing to reveal layer after layer of texture and depth to characters we've come to care about.
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Format: Hardcover
The Eagle's Prey is the best written of all Scarrow's Macro and Cato's adventures so far, in my opinion.
It begins with an attempt to trap the Celtic leader Caratacus by an increasingly desperate General Plautius, who is himself facing mounting pressure from the Emperor's freedman, Narcissus. However, under the weak leadership of the senior centurion, Maximius, Caratacus escapes with several thousand of his men. Infuriated, Plautius insists on a show of Roman disciplinary measures - decimation - to appease the Emperor. Unfortunately, Cato is amongst those singled out to be killed by his friends, which leads his loyal friend Macro to help him and the other condemmned escape.

Vespasion in turn comes up with a suggestion to restore the honour of the 2nd Legion by ordering Maximius to stir up the natives by brutal means so that Caratacus will retaliate and be forced into another trap. Cato is therefore trapped between the angry Celtic hoards, and the Romans who are determined to capture and carry out punishment.
Where this story excels is in the quality of writing which has increased in style and clarity. There are numerous fine descriptions of the landscapes, and of battlescenes that are both bloody and realistic. Both Cato and Macro develop more as characters too. Cato has to learn to lead his rag-tag followers by force of personality alone, and Macro becomes more reflective as though the two friends have undergone a personality swop. Cato's language becomes more like the colourful Macro's and Macro himself has to think hard in order to survive the fall-out from Cato's escape.
Scarrow shows also, that the brutal discipline of the Legions is in fact little better then that of the Barbarian Celts.
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