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The Dragon Conspiracy: 1 (World of Eldaterra) Hardcover – Aug 2005


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Hardcover, Aug 2005
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Eos (Aug. 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060766638
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060766634
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 2.6 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,456,082 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on 18 Aug. 2006
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book thinking it was the next in the unearthly histories series and was disappointed to find that it was actually the same book but with a different title and cover. It should say somewhere that this is the case.

Other than that, it is a good book and I look forward to seeing how the rest of the series goes.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By EA Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 15 Jan. 2006
Format: Hardcover
There are a few authors whose work is completely devoid of quality. P.R. Moredun's "The Dragon Conspiracy" is one of those.

His debut novel is a schizophrenic fantasy ride that veers from Victorian mystery to high fantasy to goofball kiddie fantasy, and is populated by stock characters who never grow out of their basic descriptions. By the halfway mark, it's difficult to even continue.

In 1895, several women were found horribly killed -- from someone that came from inside them. Fifteen years later, young James wanders from a beach into another world, and is quickly taken under the wings of loyal dwarves, stately elf ladies, and kindly wizards. This is the world of Eldaterra (or "Old World") -- and it's in danger.

Evil creatures are threatening Eldaterra's -- and Earth's -- existances, and James soon finds himself hunting for dragons in his own world. A policeman from fifteen years ago also finds himself investigating those fatal pregnancies, which are linked to the possible invasion of Earth by Eldaterra's horrific creatures... unless James can stop them.

"The Dragon Conspiracy" starts on a relatively interesting, if somewhat cliched note ("Alien," anyone?). But after the opener, Moredun veers wildly from one kind of fantasy to another. It's as if he can't make up his mind what he wants to write, so he tried to write them all. The result is a fantasy novel with a killer case of MPS.

At one point during "The Dragon Conspiracy," James reflects that "Sibelius had given a rich and evocative history of Eldaterra," but that's about as deep as Moredun goes.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful By I J Taylor on 26 Sept. 2005
Format: Hardcover
I was a bit sceptical at first as I'm not usually in to this genre but am now fully converted! A gripping tale that brilliantly inter-twines historical fact with escapist fantasy.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 10 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Disappointing, but with some good moments 31 Aug. 2005
By Dena Landon - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Fans of Eragorn will probably enjoy this old-fashioned adventure novel, though I found it disappointing. A mix of fantasy, historical fiction and mystery, the novel is at times entertaining but still failed to deliver on its promise. Moredun is at his best when he's weaving the mystery plotline in historical turn-of-the-century England. A police officer is investigating the mysterious deaths of women - all of whom were pregnant, in 1895. His story dovetails in with the story of a boy in 1910 a boy - James - who stumble through a portal and into another world called Eldaterra that lies alongside our own. Magic still exists in Eldaterra, and a war is brewing that will spill over into our world. Moredun's fantasy world was disappointing - too obvious a rip-off of Tolkien and the like. His "bad guys" were olorcs, an obvious play on Tolkien's orcs, and he avoids having to give them real motives by postulating a world where good is good and evil is evil. HIs good guy was, of course, a wizard in a tower. His "bad guys" in 1910 are, of course, German, a not very original idea. He also frequently neglects to describe his characters, (I counted at least four major characters that were never described) or does so in the vaguest of terms that make it hard to picture them. The story still has its entertaining moments, and fans of fantasy that aren't too critical will probably enjoy it, anyway. But I was hoping for something more when I picked it up and I wouldn't recommend it.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Two Stars for the Cover Art 16 Sept. 2005
By M. Mendenhall - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
Sadly, this is a book of tragically limited dimension, like an old faded, sepia-tinted Polaroid photo of what was assumably meant to be a tapestry rich with colorful design and intricate detail. The concept was rather good, but the execution, while being "quite right", was listless. I can't say as I felt true affinity to any of the characters, although the bear was almost sassy enough to be likable, and the only thing preventing me from putting the book aside after less than a dozen pages was the curiosity piqued to see how the two separate tales fifteen years apart would converge and resolve. Unfortunately, even that was a disappointment. What was this author's editor thinking? Was the manuscript even read? True, anything with magic and dragons is likely to be of attraction at this time, and sequels already planned give some potential to job security, but "not badly written" should not be the criteria by which an editor proposes publication. Those of us voracious readers and defenders of the genre will not be satiated by a thin broth of plot and limp, tasteless noodles badly disguised as characters, however many there may be, when it is a thick juicy prime cut of fantasy skillfully carved up and heavily seasoned with full bodied, spicy imagination into which we crave to sink our teeth. This fare leaves us hungry still and in need of rinsing our palate clean with a jigger of the finest vintage Tolkien. So sad.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Cliched storyline, completely uninvolving 28 Oct. 2005
By tygerlilix - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
The World of Eldaterra: The Dragon Conspiracy was interesting - if you are the type of person who enjoys books containing no emotion. The storyline was interesting, if a bit unoriginal; the idea of saving multiple worlds is not new. It did have an interesting little tie-in with an investigator, but even that lacked flavor. I never felt very connected with the characters throughout the course of this book. I didn't particularly care what happened to them and I couldn't empathize with them. The only highlight of this book was the writing, which was on the better side. But all in all, this one's a book to miss.
Old world, old stuff 15 Jan. 2006
By E. A Solinas - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
There are a few authors whose work is completely devoid of quality. P.R. Moredun's "The Dragon Conspiracy" is one of those.

His debut novel is a schizophrenic fantasy ride that veers from Victorian mystery to high fantasy to goofball kiddie fantasy, and is populated by stock characters who never grow out of their basic descriptions. By the halfway mark, it's difficult to even continue.

In 1895, several women were found horribly killed -- from someone that came from inside them. Fifteen years later, young James wanders from a beach into another world, and is quickly taken under the wings of loyal dwarves, stately elf ladies, and kindly wizards. This is the world of Eldaterra (or "Old World") -- and it's in danger.

Evil creatures are threatening Eldaterra's -- and Earth's -- existances, and James soon finds himself hunting for dragons in his own world. A policeman from fifteen years ago also finds himself investigating those fatal pregnancies, which are linked to the possible invasion of Earth by Eldaterra's horrific creatures... unless James can stop them.

"The Dragon Conspiracy" starts on a relatively interesting, if somewhat cliched note ("Alien," anyone?). But after the opener, Moredun veers wildly from one kind of fantasy to another. It's as if he can't make up his mind what he wants to write, so he tried to write them all. The result is a fantasy novel with a killer case of MPS.

At one point during "The Dragon Conspiracy," James reflects that "Sibelius had given a rich and evocative history of Eldaterra," but that's about as deep as Moredun goes. Eldaterra never has any depth as an alternate world, nor do the cliched creatures that populate it -- noble elves, kind wizards, stout-hearted dwarves, and talking animals.

Moreover, about two-thirds of the way through, Moredun starts getting silly. By that point, he has introduced us to a ladies' club for dragons ("The Monster Diet Program"), who are evil without a reason to be. The low point is when he introduces an American dragon named Ballasifimor Crazychainsaw. I couldn't make that up.

And the writing doesn't provide any magic either -- epic battles take place in a few pages, maximum, and Moredun clumsily tries to weave the World War I politics into the plot. Dragons in league with the Nazis? James and his dwarf pals can't salvage the plot; they have as much depth as the absurdly-named dragons. Even when an important character dies, it seems like a passing obstacle.

The book book of the "World of Eldaterra" series is a disastrous collection of cliches, silly villains and a very uninviting "old world." Perhaps it will improve -- but don't hold your breath.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Second book I've never finished. 11 Nov. 2005
By Dragon Quill - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I am a proud person, and in all of my book reading, I have only left one book unfinished. Wait, the record is up to two. The Dragon Conspiracy has added to my record. Drats, but I could not force myself to read it. I just couldn't.

Here are the things that kept me from finishing, both the pet peeves and the blaring facts.

You begin The Dragon Conspiracy smack in the middle of the 'action'. That normally is a very nice way to start a YA novel. It was done fairly well, I will admit, but never once did I get a description of the main characters. It is a pet peeve of mine, yes, but in all of the hundred pages I trudged through, never once did I even get a basic: tall, short, skinny...eye color...hair color... In fact, this novel lacks description as it were wrung out. It is nice to let readers imagine stuff on their own, true, but a little guidance would be welcome, and is necessary. At least to me.

This novel also lacks heart. There is a scene maybe sixty pages in that had the potential to be touching. I was left wondering, though, "Did he [the author] mean this to be sad?" If he did, he did a poor job. I did not feel for the characters at all, though I was mildly interested in the dog. If something is supposed to be sad, then I darn well hope that I at least feel something. I instead felt the need to get a new book.

TDC was also rather predictable, and too fast paced for me. The pace did not allow for any 'natural' characterization, meaning the building of a character through their and actions. It was typical light/high fantasy, with your elves and dwarves and magic portals and giant spiders. I picked up this novel expecting to at least be entertained. It should never be a chore to read a book, only may pride kept me going on this one, and even that failed.

I strongly caution against this book. It has its one star, because the writing was a little better than average, but writing itself means nothing to me if there exists no story, no decent characters, and no sense of plot. I was entranced by the summary snippet I read before buying and the stanza of the poem on the back, and my love of dragons drew me to it, but this is not a novel I enjoyed. I couldn't even finish it.
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