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The Downhill Lie: A Hacker's Return to a Ruinous Sport Paperback – 5 May 2009


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The Downhill Lie: A Hacker's Return to a Ruinous Sport + Fairway To Hell + Star Island
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Product details

  • Paperback: 207 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage Books USA; 1 Reprint edition (5 May 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307280454
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307280459
  • Product Dimensions: 13.1 x 1.8 x 20.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 655,785 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Carl Hiaasen was born and raised in Florida. He is the author of twelve novels, including the bestselling Nature Girl, Skinny Dip, Sick Puppy and Lucky You, and three bestselling children's books, Hoot, Flush and Scat. They have been translated into 34 languages, 33 more than he can read or write. Carl Hiaasen also writes an award-winning column for The Miami Herald.

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3.3 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Vincent Agnew on 22 Dec. 2008
Format: Hardcover
If you enjoyed this book, don't be tempted to buy Hiaasen's "Fairway to Hell". It's the same book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Angie Wirral on 18 Aug. 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is also available in another title and there is no mention of this fact in the product guide.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 23 May 2008
Format: Hardcover
In our own minds, playing the game of golf becomes the kind of titanic tussle that we have so often observed as Tiger, Phil, and Vijay fight it out on some tough course while we watch on television. In fact, when you play the Old Course at St. Andrews, you can hire a video crew to follow you around on the last few holes and provide commentary.

But the reality is far different. Most of us hit many more bad shots than good ones. The appeal of the game quickly becomes beating others in Nassau's abetted by our large handicaps. I came to think of golf's enduring appeal as being in part the opportunity for middle aged people to have their own Little League.

Usually, a club will put you together with those of similar ineptitude and you soon forget how bad you are. Being a hacker myself, I was once absolutely floored to watch Chi Chi Rodriguez (all 147 pounds of him) easily lofting shots onto a green 230 yards away from a deep bunker while shooting an advertisement on my home course. Now, I had never gotten onto that green in less than two shots from there (and not often in only two).

Years later, I had a chance to meet Chi Chi, and I told him how humbling it had been to watch him. He stared at me for one count and then said, "Now you know how I felt the first time I saw Tiger hit the ball."

Having played the game diligently (and poorly) for most of my adult life, I was curious about what it would be like to return to the game as Carl Hiaasen did in his 50's in order to write a book. I was immediately struck that all of the silliness that I had observed in myself and others was reflected in the book.

I've always found that observing the frustrations that others experience with golf to be hilarious (but I'm usually able to keep a straight face).
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