The Double 2013

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Simon is a timid man, scratching out an isolated existence in an indifferent world. He is overlooked at work, scorned by his mother, and ignored by the woman of his dreams. He feels powerless to change any of these things. The arrival of a new co-worker, James, serves to upset the balance. James is both Simons exact physical double and his opposite - confident, charismatic and good with women. To Simons horror, James slowly starts taking over his life.

Starring:
Mia Wasikowska, Jesse Eisenberg
Rental Formats:
DVD, Blu-ray

The Double (2013)

Product Details

Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 33 minutes
Starring Mia Wasikowska, Jesse Eisenberg, Chris O'Dowd
Director Richard Ayoade
Genres Comedy
Studio Elevation Sales
Rental release 4 August 2014
Main languages English
Discs
  • Feature ages_15_and_over
Runtime 1 hour 33 minutes
Starring Mia Wasikowska, Jesse Eisenberg, Chris O'Dowd
Director Richard Ayoade
Genres Comedy
Studio Elevation Sales
Rental release 4 August 2014
Main languages English

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
This item has not been released yet and is not eligible to be reviewed.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By The Movie Guy TOP 500 REVIEWER on 27 May 2014
Format: DVD
Simon James (Jesse Eisenberg) is a rather pathetic introvert. He is "lonely, lost, and invisible" living in a fictional society that could pass for a set on "Eraser Head." Hanna (Mia Wasikowska) works at the same place as Simon and has similar issues of identity. Then along comes James Simon, an individual who looks identical to Simon James except he has personality. He pole vaults to the top of the corporation without knowing what they do.

The film is clearly symbolic and metaphorical, but of what, I am uncertain. One line from the film "giving faceless people immortality" almost seems like a reference to Internet social media such as Facebook. The film is based on a Russian novella by the same name. I have stopped reading Russian novels because there is so much packed into them, they make my head explode.

The novella itself doesn't offer an explanation, although three have been offered by critics:

1) Main character is insane

2) Author is insane

3)'The human will in its search for total freedom of expression becomes a self-destructive impulse.’"

The film was well done as it captured a mood and allowed the viewer to assign their own significance to it. However, this is clearly not a film for everyone. Those who don't like films with massive amounts of symbolism to the point the linear plot doesn't make any sense, need to avoid this one. Dostoyevsky fans are welcomed.

Parental Guide: F-bomb. No sex ot nudity
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Scaroth, Last of the Jagaroth on 20 April 2014
Format: DVD
Dostoyevsky’s minor classic short story sees a downtrodden office clerk Yakov Petrovich Golyadkin (played here as Simon James by Jesse Eisenberg) brought to the brink of madness, when a doppelganger comes to his workplace and no one but Simon seems to see that they are essentially the same person. Whether Dostoyevsky’s protagonist is suffering from schizophrenia is unclear but highly probable, and his low self-esteem and feeling that he is an invisible non-person in his highly regimented society only add to his sense of ‘lost-ness’.
Eisenberg is outstanding as both the pathetic Simon and his uber-confident double James, while support from the likes of Wallace Shawn as Simon’s fast-talking line-manager, Tim Key as a creepy nurse, and Mia Wasikowska as Hannah, the girl he worships from afar, ensures that this is a quality affair throughout. Director Richard Ayeoade hits the nail squarely on the head with his second feature, after the disappointingly insubstantial Submarine, and creates a claustrophobic and creepy mood, whilst getting the very best out of his primarily youthful cast.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Lister on 22 May 2014
Format: DVD
"I and the world happen to have a slight difference of opinion," the 18th century religious leader Richard Brothers wrote from the Bedlam asylum; "the world said I was mad, and I said the world was mad. I was outvoted, and here I am."

Simon James (Jesse Eisenberg) does things that in a sane world would seem mad, but in Richard Ayoade's nightmarish bureaucrapolis seem entirely rational. It's well established that if most characters in romantic comedies were transposed to the real world they wouldn't be romantic, they'd be creepy. The Double reverses this idea by making Simon's world so loveless and cynical that any sliver of compassion or empathy shines like a beacon in the dark.

It's a hard sell, spending so much time with one so cripplingly shy. But Simon is as genuinely good as his doppelganger is genuinely unpleasant. Manipulative and misogynistic, James Simon (Eisenberg again, natch) swoops into Simon James' workplace - a brilliantly realised steamy set, reminiscent of Terry Gilliam's Brazil - and seduces everyone, including Simon himself.

At this point it seems as if the film is about to take a turn into familiar Fight Club territory, with a love story between the two men representing each side of a seriously split personality. But, wisely, Ayoade doesn't dwell on the novelty, and the film veers into stranger, darker, more ambiguous territory, where identities and intentions are never fully resolved.

The object of Simon's (and, briefly, James') affection is Hannah (Mia Wasikowska). Again, cliché is narrowly dodged: she's dangerously close to the Manic Pixie Dream Girl template - except there's a heavy, selfish sadness in her that gives Simon cause to truly fight for her affections, and ultimately her faith in humanity.
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lola TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 27 May 2014
Format: DVD
I love both Jesse Eisenberg and Mia Wasikowska - they are no doubt talented young actors, so I was very excited to see the film based on study of psychological condition of one "little man" by no other than Feodor Dostoyevsky.

Now, I doubt you will enjoy this film unless you are very into intellectually demanding films, and you don't care about the story as much as you care about acting, and setting, and almost palpable events taking place on screen (all symbols and metaphors, with occasional joke - yes, a funny joke! - thrown in). Acting is superb. Jesse Eisenberg, he nails the role. I actually felt that I am watching 2 difference actors on screen, more so as the film progressed. But other than that, the film does not really have much to offer in terms of compassion or your involvement with the leads. It's a love story, but who cares. It's a struggle of a clerk, but who cares. The film does not really have a story, and I do care about the story. As the film of dementia/paranoid person loosing his identity to his alter ego, I don't think the film is a fantastic study. It's too bare, too narrow, too unembellished and leaves you emotionally exhausted.
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