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The Doors [Blu-ray]

90 customer reviews

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The Doors [Blu-ray] + When You're Strange - A Film About The Doors [Blu-ray] [Region Free] + Live At The Bowl '68 [Blu-ray] [2012] [Region Free]
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Product details

  • Actors: Val Kilmer, Kyle MacLachlan, Michael Wincott, Meg Ryan, Kathleen Quinlan
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: English, French, German
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9 - 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 18
  • Studio: Optimum Home Entertainment
  • DVD Release Date: 18 April 2011
  • Run Time: 134 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B004OQJSEU
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 20,574 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Product Description

Oliver Stone directs this film biography of Jim Morrison, lead singer of the celebrated 1960s rock group The Doors. It traces the group's road to success, from their first rehearsal sessions through to their sell-out live concerts, and follows Morrison on the self-destructive path which would eventually take him to an early death. Starring Val Kilmer as Morrison, Meg Ryan as his girlfriend Pamela Courson, and Kyle MacLachlan as Ray Manzarek, the band's organist.

From Amazon.co.uk

Thanks in large part to its meticulous re-creation of the late-1960s and early-'70s rock scene and the uncannily authentic performance by Val Kilmer as legendary Doors frontman Jim Morrison, Oliver Stone's hypnotic film biography is standing the test of time. Capturing the carefree mood of the Age of Aquarius, the film charts the meteoric rise of the Doors on the California club circuit (including a memorable scene showing the creation of the hit "Light My Fire"), and chronicles the band's exploits with hallucinogenics and Morrison's battles against charges of public indecency on stage. Kilmer's performance is hauntingly perfect, and performances by Meg Ryan, Kathleen Quinlan and Kyle MacLachlan are similarly impressive. The movie doesn't fully probe the depths of Morrison's character, but as a portrait of excess it is vividly true to the spirit of the self-destructive poet known to his fans as "The Lizard King". --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By B. Howe on 12 Jan. 2010
Format: DVD
There's a lot of disparity of opinion here about whether the film is great or terrible, and the truth is that it really is pretty good; not mind bendingly brilliant, but a really honest artistic attempt at recreating the life of the Doors and Jim Morrision at the time. I was afraid it would be a shameless rummage through Doors hits, and an excuse to plaster them on screen, exploiting the Morrison myth, but it's really not. It follows Morrison from the beginning of the 60's up until his death, and along the way gives a perspective on the wayward ride there. It is not a definitive account, but how could it be? It will not satisfy everyone's 'expectations', but then again the myth surrounding Morrison is so prolific and varying that no film ever will do this. Also, people looking to mindlessly venerate Jim Morrison might want to reconsider buying it, or change their perspective. It is not a hallowed hall of shining glory all the way through, and if it was, it wouldn't be a very accurate depiction of Jim's life, or the Doors' music.

What it is, is a really good attempt at rendering a subjective look at the Doors and Morrison; part myth, part fact, and at times as listless as Morrison's own mind must have been. It's helped on by Val Kilmer who, as the official review up there says, does a frighteningly good Morrison singing impression. He looks the part and acts it well, and is follwed by great supporting actors. There are some reviews here deriding Kilmer, but I think from looking at them, they mostly have to do with people projecting their desire to have the 'real' Jim Morrison, and that's not going to happen.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Joe Mendonca on 25 Mar. 2011
Format: DVD
Oliver Stone has captured and era and tells the story of The Doors. Val Kilmer has the most convincing voice with actually singing, sounding like the voice of Jim Morrison - this is no lip snyc act, which makes this performance just believalble.

Love or hate the Doors, or Jim Morrison, those were the days and this film caputures the zeitgeist of the time.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Paul Comerford on 12 Feb. 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I first owned this film on video (remember those?) and it reintroduced me to The Doors. It has dated a little yet that feels alright as it makes it seem authentic. I have all The Doors music and books of Jim Morrison's poems and they tweak my heart as I miss my youth and it echoes in films such as this. Jim Morrison was flawed whereas the rest of the band were fairly level headed, but the naive compexity of his lyrics are still rather obscure in meaning. I love this film and think Val Kilmer is quite brilliant. 4 stars because it is open to debate as to accuracy, but worth an archive spot in anyone's library.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sam Atherton on 22 Jun. 2012
Format: DVD
This is the fourth time I'm buying this movie. 2x VHS and now 2x DVD. My copies keep going missing - and I keep having my moments when I want to watch The Doors The Movie again. That's in a nutshell. Is it a great movie? If you have that whole Doors vibe going and you "get it" it absolutely is. Val Kilmer is mesmerizing on occasions, and does a fantastic job throughout. The director knew exactly what he was doing, demonstrating the coming together, sparking and disintegration process in sound and vision so much so, it hurts sometimes.

I've seen reviews where people are complaining about the wigs, about certain camera techniques, about the artistic licence that was taken to translate what are *lives* in essence into a movie that only lasts for a couple of hours; I can only say, shame you didn't get it, but that's ok. Those of us who do, we know what this is and it's an extraordinary thing which, like the Doors itself, will last the ages.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By NELLY on 20 Aug. 2011
Format: DVD
An ok film, but if you are looking for truth and facts about the lizard king then probably best to read a book or do your own investigating rather than watching this as it is a film after all and not a documentary. I have read a couple of books on Jim Morrison and you need to make your own minds up after reading, not watching this. But saying that this is mildly entertaining.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jet Lagged TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 1 April 2013
Format: DVD
"There are things known and things unknown and in between are The Doors." - Jim Morrison

Oliver Stone allegedly took some liberties with the screenplay. But who cares?

Van Kilmer has got into the part of Jim Morrison so much that it's uncanny...

This is a fantastic movie.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan James Romley on 29 Jun. 2006
Format: DVD
The Doors is a bizarre and at times uneven film that seemingly tries to mix the real-life story of the legendary band with the mystical and metaphysical influences behind their enigmatic front man, Jim Morrison. As a result, it begins with a scene of Morrison as a boy, driving through the Navajo desert with his family and witnessing the site of a car crash in which a group of Native Americans have been severely injured or killed. The key song, Riders of the Storm, plays in the background, as director Oliver Stone (in collaboration with cinematographer Robert Richardson) uses colour effects and digital manipulation to create a hauntingly surreal landscaped, bathed in blood red light and lost within a wavering sense of heat and claustrophobia. The scene becomes the axis on which the subsequent story will pivot, managing to establish and convey Morrison's various obsessions with shaman culture, mysticism, the desert and death.

From here, the film adopts a (brief) sense of normality, showing us how the original line-up of the Doors came into effect, and how they managed to find an audience through constant gigging in and around downtown Los Angeles. However, once the band have become established and a general chronology of events has been put into place, Stone goes off on a tangent, showing Morrison engulfed by rock and roll excess, fighting his demons and still coming to terms with the lone spirit of death (a vision that was seemingly there from the start, cradling a dying man on that lonesome stretch of desert road).
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