The Dog and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
  • RRP: £16.99
  • You Save: £13.00 (77%)
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Dog has been added to your Basket
+ £2.80 UK delivery
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Expedited shipping available on this book. The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Dog Hardcover – 31 Jul 2014

38 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£3.99
£2.63 £0.71
Audio CD, Audiobook
"Please retry"
£20.58
£3.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Dog + To Rise Again at a Decent Hour
Price For Both: £10.73

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Fourth Estate (31 July 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007275749
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007275748
  • Product Dimensions: 14.1 x 2.5 x 22.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 18,949 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Joseph O'Neill is an Irish barrister living in New York. He is the author of three previous novels, 'Netherland' (longlisted for the Man Booker Prize 2008), 'This Is the Life' and 'The Breezes', as well as a memoir, 'Blood-Dark Track'.

Product Description

Review

‘I’m in love with this book … It’s superbly written and very very funny and also very true’ David Aaronovitch

‘On page after page, O'Neill can still dazzle as a compellingly intelligent writer. Everywhere you look, there's a shimmering portrait of modernity waiting to be glimpsed … [An] ambitious, lucidly thought-through novel’ Guardian

‘Our only truly international writer … Breathtaking … O'Neill's writing reflects the individual's concerns in our desolate modern world in prose that is illuminating, amusing, sometimes beautiful, but never showy … A joy to read … Supremely insightful and intelligent … You can open the book anywhere and find sparkling sentences that perfectly describe what is momentarily in focus … Original and brilliant’ Irish Independent

‘O’Neill has become a writer extraordinarily attuned to the global and the post-national … Like “Netherland”, THE DOG has captured the zeitgeist … This is where O’Neill feels at home: telling the stories of those who cease to belong’ Telegraph

‘Sharp, sad and sometimes hilarious, this is a fable for our times’ Daily Mail

‘A mercilessly absurd portrait of the city’s wealthy residents … Our narrator is like Woody Allen trapped inside a Kafka novel … Brilliant … One of the wittiest critiques of modern, materialistic life that you’ll read for a long while’ The Times

‘The best comic novel I’ve read for ages’ The Scotsman

‘Enraged, brutal, witty and at times brilliant’ Sunday Times

‘Erudite and deliciously comic … like a mix of Martin Amis and Thomas Bernhard …With consummate elegance, THE DOG turns in on itself in imitation of the dreadful circling and futility of consciousness itself … Its wit and brio keeps us more temporarily alive than we usually allow ourselves to be’ New York Times Book Review

‘A mordantly funny and, surprisingly for these times, deeply moral tale of lost love and economic betrayal’ John Banville, Observer, Books of the Year

About the Author

Joseph O’Neill is the author of three previous novels, ‘This is the Life’, ‘The Breezes’ and Man Booker-longlisted ‘Netherland’, as well as a memoir, ‘Blood-Dark Track’. He lives in New York.


Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By L. Davidson VINE VOICE on 25 Oct. 2014
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book because I quite liked one of the author's earlier novels,"Netherland" and also because it was long listed for the Man Booker Prize, so I figured it would be worth reading. However I found "The Dog" to be a major disappointment and a bit of a bore. Thankfully it is not very long. The book is narrated by an American ex pat lawyer resident in Dubai ,working for a wealthy Lebanese family. The narrator has recently broken up acrimoniously with his long term girlfriend and has come to Dubai to make a new start. Unfortunately the (unnamed) narrator isn't very interesting or likeable and his rambling discourses about his relationships and life in Dubai didn't engage me at all. Nothing of interest happens in this novel,none of the characters are likeable and Dubai comes across as a very dull,soulless sort of a place, just like the narrator. This book made no impression on me at all and I fail to see how it was a contender for such a prestigious award as the Man Booker Prize.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By meg keir on 25 Nov. 2014
Format: Hardcover
Strange as it might seem to some other reviewers I actually quite liked the poor Dog : I certainly pitied him in the hole which he could have foreseen , after his abortive trip to London for the interview for the job in Dubai. We are actually never told how he came to be there eventually.
I enjoyed the pace and brio of the endless ruminations which absolutely illustrated the misery he was mired in and how trapped he felt.Not that I would have liked it to go on much longer mind you but it is a piece of virtuoso writing and as such deserves praise .A stopover in Dubai convinced me it was a place I would never return to and this has reinforced that view.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By DubaiReader VINE VOICE on 3 Nov. 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I was really hoping for a book based around the ironies that form modern day Dubai, instead, I got a rambling nonsense of facetious observations, pornography, meaningless words and multi-brackets.

So, here's an example of one needlessly wordy sentence: " I felt ashamed, specifically ashamed, that is, which is to say, filled with shame additional to the general ignominy that is the corollary of insight, i.e., the ignominy of having thus far lived in error, of having failed, until the moment of so-called insight, to understand what could have been understood earlier, an ignominy only deepened by prospective shame, because the moment of insight serves as a reminder that more such moments lie ahead, and that one always goes forward in error."
What pleasure is there in reading such knotted writing?

On the multi-bracket front, a number of sentences had as many as six brackets within brackets. Many words produced 'no definition' in my Kindle dictionary search and the insertion of many French phrases, without translation, was irritating. Some pages were just lists, even a list of e mails that the narrator would like to send to his boss, but never did. Then there was the section about what sort of pornography our hero liked to 'jerk-off' to.
The characters were all unlikable, almost without exception - Ali, the man-of-all-trades was the only one I had any empathy for.

The one redeeming factor was the naming of the fictional tower blocks where the narrator lived - he resides in the area of Privilege Bay, in The Situation, alongside The Statement and The Aspiration, and overlooking Astrominium, which is due to be over half a kilometer in height. These cleverly named blocks promised insights that never materialised.
And what about the Ted Wilson plot line?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
I received this book for free through Goodreads First Reads.

It is not easy to determine what the key storyline or purpose of Joseph O’Neills latest novel The Dog. As the blurb indicates an attorney from New York met an old college friend in 2007 who offered him a job in a family business in Dubai. The attorney appears to be narrating four years after this occasion, describing his life thus far.

The narrator, despite being the main character, remains anonymous throughout the book. Although he never reveals his identity he does offer a lot of other information about his life. It is clear from the overly formal writing style (after ignoring the odd curse word) that he is a rather intelligent man – although, ironically, this makes him sound a bit stupid when recounting certain experiences.

The writing style is almost diary like and contains, unintentionally from the character’s point of view, a great deal of humour. The attorney becomes transfixed over the disappearance of an acquaintance whilst struggling to deal with his unwanted summer intern. It is undetermined what importance this has on the overall novel, however.

Sometimes it is difficult to follow the chronology of events as the narrator’s thoughts jump around from current proceedings to those of the past, particularly issues with his ex-girlfriend from four or so years before, which it is evident he has not got over. As already mentioned, the story is written in a formal way which only those of a greater intelligence have a chance of appreciating. It is easy for the mind to drift as the text becomes boring, however, during the times that it is possible to engage with the book that formal language feels oddly satisfying.

Those intending to read The Dog must be prepared to concentrate, it is not a book to relax with. Although full of wit and clever insights, if you are unable to focus nothing will be got out of reading this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback