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The Dilbert Principle (A Dilbert Book) Mass Market Paperback – 6 Oct 2000


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The Dilbert Principle (A Dilbert Book) + The Peter Principle: Why Things Always Go Wrong + 21 Dirty Tricks at Work: How to Win at Office Politics
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Product details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Boxtree; Reprint edition (6 Oct 2000)
  • Language: French
  • ISBN-10: 0752272209
  • ISBN-13: 978-0752272207
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (62 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 183,019 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 6 Oct 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
..This is not another book of cartoons. If all you want is a comic book, or if you simply have a limited attention span, then look elsewhere.
The 'Dilbert' strip has satirised management stupidity for many years, and has done so very accurately. Most of the ideas come from the e-mails sent to author Scott Adams by readers relating real life stories of office life.
What Adams has done here is to distil the wisdom that comes from observing these absurdities. This book doesn't just poke fun, it offers commonsense advice about how to run an office more efficiently and more humanely. Humour is a very effective vehicle for teaching these lessons, and the result here is arguably the best book ever written about management.
Most management books are rubbish. They are humourless and, as often as not, merely promote some passing fad in management theory. You always see them at airport bookstalls ("20 ways to do this" or "10 magic formulas for that"). If you are a manager in an office, do yourself a favour and buy this instead. Also read the sequels, "Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook" and "The Dilbert Future". You'll have a good laugh (sometimes, painfully, at your own expense) and, who knows, you might even become a better manager.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Martin Turner HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 29 Nov 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Books like this really shouldn't be allowed. They impart dangerous information to receptive minds and reveal things about management that a whole industry has been labouring for years to keep hidden.
The chapter on writing your own appraisal, for example, is very, very dangerous. I have never allowed any of my staff to see it, although I did make use of it when preparing my own appraisal for my boss's signature.
Simple tricks like the 'big picture manouvre' are just too good and useful to be dished out in paperback format.
Scott Adams takes 'the Peter Principle' into an entirely new space. Instead of writing about managers who have been promoted to their level of incompetence, he takes on whole corporate cultures which have grown to their level of incompetence. Everybody who has ever recommended 'concentrating our assets across the board' or, indeed, 'zooming in on the big picture', ought to read this book. Everybody who has ever considered punishing staff for having poor morale should read it. And every pointy haired manager who believes that anything he doesn't understand can't be very difficult should read it.
But workers? They should not be allowed to read it. It should be removed from their bookshelves and libraries. People buying this book online should have to prove that they are management grades before they complete their purchases.
Books like this are just too dangerous.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By C. M. Perkins on 11 Jan 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Most people who work in an office can identify with Dilbert, the pointy-haired boss and all the other characters in the cartoon strip. You won't be disappointed with this collection.
In addition, you get Scott Adams observations on all the usual aspects of life in the workplace (just as funny as the cartoons) and, often the funniest bits, excerpts of e-mails from readers about real-life cubicle idiocy.
Get some relief from the tedium and the madness of working in an office, buy this book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jack Feeney-Author / Analyst on 7 Oct 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Non-stop laughs await the reader of this brilliant work. Scott Adams has an incredible ability to detect the absurd in the world of corporations and management and turn it into entertainment for the masses of cube dwellers who must endure it day after day. I especially enjoyed his analysis of "downsizing" (now called 'rightsizing' in management BS terms) and the way management will package it in the future.
The most surprising part of the book was Scott Adams' description of the principles he would use to run a company starting by getting rid of the HR department! All his ideas actually make a lot of sense and would probably help to make a company more successful.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ross on 4 April 2009
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A pithy explanation of how modern corporations work. I read this years ago and was about to give my copy away, but decided to have a last look at it and I'm glad I did.

The idiocies of modern management are dissected in prose, cartoons and woth the aid of true stories sent in by Adams' readers.

The style makes the Dilbert Principle a wonderful book for dipping in and out of for five minutes at a time and is thoroughly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bernie VINE VOICE on 7 July 2005
Format: Audio Cassette
This book is so real that it is scary. You can tell that Scott Adams has spent time. His description of cube life is still relevant today.
I have been trying to justify the Peter Principle and could not make it fit but after reading this book all things became clear. It is impossible to keep a straight face in meetings with out seeing the different types of personalities doing their thing. I can even anticipate what they are going to say and the reactions.
Usually as most books and movies you recognize everyone but yourself. The most obnoxious person will laugh at his stereotype or just not get the point when it comes to movies and books. However this book is scary in the fact that I could see myself when Scott was describing engineers. And it took a little while to realize what he was talking about the ringing device that knows when to break your concentration.
I am going to leave a copy on QA's desk.
MY next must read is "Dogbert's Top Secret Management Handbook"
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