The Diana Chronicles and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£1.90
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This item will be picked, packed and shipped by Amazon and is eligible for free delivery within the UK
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Diana Chronicles Hardcover – 21 Jun 2007


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£10.99 £0.01


Product details

  • Hardcover: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Century; First Edition edition (21 Jun. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1846052866
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846052866
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 4.3 x 24 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 708,268 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"Intensely well researched and an un putdown able read...It is a
tragi-comedy, a soap opera, a social commentary a historical document and a
psychological examination, written by a superb investigative journalist."
-- Helen Mirren

Book Description

A commemorative edition, containing new material on Prince William's marriage to Kate Middleton, to mark the 50th anniversary of Diana's birth. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Julia Flyte TOP 100 REVIEWER on 12 April 2008
Format: Hardcover
This is a well written and compulsively readable book, which captures the essence of Diana better than any other biography I've read - and I've read many. Most books about Diana seem fall into one of two camps: either they are overly gushing and sympathetic (eg Andrew Morton, Paul Burrell) or they are critical in the extreme (eg Lady Colin Campbell, Patrick Jephson). Tina Brown is neither. She calls Diana out on her untruths (it's highly unlikely that Diana deliberately threw herself down the stairs) but also points out where her paranoia was justified (yes, the Squidgeygate tapes were deliberately released).

There's not a lot of new material here (what was there left to find out?), but it's a very comprehensive look at Diana's life that pulls together all the various things that are known about her in such a way that you feel that you are viewing the truest and most complete picture yet. It also gave me a strong sense of what life behind the Palace walls is actually like and why Diana felt so isolated and uncomfortable there.

Tina Brown is particularly good at getting inside Charles and Diana's heads: explaining Charles's misgivings at the time of the engagement or Diana's thoughts when she agreed to the divorce. At one point she refers to Diana being a tactician rather than a strategist (always going for the short term win rather than thinking of the long game), which I thought was a very astute observation. She discusses the Charles/Diana/Camilla triangle at great length, and ultimately concludes that quite possibly the marriage could have worked had Camilla not been ever-present (Camilla doesn't come across very well at all).

This is a long book which starts a little slowly, but from the time that Diana meets Charles it races along. It's amusing, it's insightful and it leaves you wistful for what could have been.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr. J. I. Currie on 17 July 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I thought I was being a bit superficial in ordering this book but thought it worth a try after an excellent review in the Sunday Times. I found it riveting!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Soph on 31 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After reading hit and miss reviews on this book I decided to decide for myself! I am now near enough half way through The Diana Chronicles and it was a taugh start. Tina starts the book with the crash in Paris which gets me interested and into the book then she goes off on her times as an editor and blah blah blah. At page 22 things pick up when we learn about Diana's mother... For me the book gets going with the Chapter 4- The Sloane Ranger. From then it's go go go! We learn about 'that night' on the royal train and other interesting facts about the WHOLE royal family that I'd never learnt of! Get the book people... It's a long and very interesting read!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Ms. K. J. Waghorn on 20 Aug. 2012
Format: Paperback
Why did Tina Brown write this book to coincide with the tenth anniversary of the death of the Princess of Wales? My answer to that question is simply, because by that time there were plenty of other books already published from which she could source her material.

This is a very long book [over 400 pages of small print, with no photographs] and although it does give the reader a lot to think about, I couldn't escape the feeling that it could have been a better book.

There is a lot of "padding" with regard to the Spencer ancestry that is not exactly necessary, no matter how interesting it might be. Some of the sentences are too long and convoluted and despite repeated reading, still do not make sense. This could be due to poor editing and if so, does Ms. Brown no favours.

In addition, the writer sometimes uses words the ordinary reader wouldn't have come across [and I class myself as reasonably well-read but not intellectual]. How often have you used the word "samizdat"? Do you know what it means? I did wonder if Ms. Brown uses such odd words in her ordinary work or if she was just trying to impress the reader with her knowledge.

I can understand why Tina Brown was offered this assignment: she is an experienced magazine editor and apparently not unfamiliar with the aristocratic world of the nobility but she has lived in the USA since 1984, and the absence of detail regarding some of Princess Diana's charitable work and visits in the UK and overseas is frankly, astonishing. Ms. Brown seems to have devoted a great deal of her time and effort in covering Diana's ancestry, childhood, teenage years and the early married years.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This is essential reading for anyone who wants to know about the workings of power in the UK and beyond. Diana was always a great hit in the Latin community - where we - like much of the rest of the world - assumed she was assainated for considering marrying a Muslim, and opposing landmines. This book disputes this theory at some length, but meanwhile there is much inspiration in a memoir that is fluent interesting and engaging throughout!

Tina Brown does not opt for the adulatory approach in her assessment of Diana's strange and eerie ambition to be a member of the Royal Family from an early age.
Yet she does perform the awesome task of respecting Diana's status as international icon, while also respecting and having sympathy for her as a flesh and blood woman.
Frances Shand Kydd and Raine Spencer also emerge in a good light. These are English women I would like to meet (!) Tina Brown thinks Princess Anne is `more temperamentally suited than any of her brothers to be King'.
Interesting.
There is also the bigger picture: `England in the 1980s was defined to the rest of the world by three globe-trotting divas: Diana, Princess of Wales, Prime Minister Margaret Thatever and Joan Collins...The British Isles have shrunk a little since they reverted to a culture curated by men' Diana's gifts were supposedly small but radiant "An invisible thread of kindliness drew her to people who expected the least and needed the most...It is one of the saddest ironies of her life that just when she ws on the point of casting off the most toxic elements of celebrity culture and using her fame as collateral for daring social activism she should be locked by death in a freeze-frame of deadly glitz'.

According to Tony Blair, Princess Diana `taught us a new way to be British'.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback