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The Detachment (John Rain Thrillers) Audio CD – Audiobook, 11 Feb 2014


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Product details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (11 Feb 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1480592749
  • ISBN-13: 978-1480592742
  • Product Dimensions: 16.5 x 2.9 x 14 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (117 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,830,431 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

A Note On The New Titles

Why have I changed the titles of the Rain books? Simply because I've never thought the titles were right for the stories. The right title matters--if only because the wrong one has the same effect as an inappropriate frame around an otherwise beautiful painting. Not only does the painting not look good in the wrong frame; it will sell for less, as well. And if you're the artist behind the painting, having to see it in the wrong frame, and having to live with the suboptimal commercial results, is aggravating.

The sad story of the original Rain titles began with the moniker Rain Fall for the first in the series. It was a silly play on the protagonist's name, and led to an unfortunate and unimaginative sequence of similar such meaningless, interchangeable titles: Hard Rain, Rain Storm, Killing Rain (the British titles were better, but still not right: Blood from Blood for #2; Choke Point for #3; One Last Kill for #4). By the fifth book, I was desperate for something different, and persuaded my publisher to go with The Last Assassin, instead. In general, I think The Last Assassin is a good title, but in fairness it really has nothing to do with the story in the fifth book beyond the fact that there's an assassin in it. But it was better than more of Rain This and Rain That. The good news is, the fifth book did very well indeed; the bad news is, the book's success persuaded my publisher that assassin was a magic word and that what we needed now was to use the word assassin in every title. And so my publisher told me that although they didn't care for my proposed title for the sixth book--The Killer Ascendant--they were pleased to have come up with something far better. The sixth book, they told me proudly, would be known as The Quiet Assassin.

I tried to explain that while not quite as redundant as, say, The Deadly Assassin or The Lethal Assassin, a title suggesting an assassin might be notable for his quietness was at best uninteresting (as opposed to, say, Margret Atwood's The Blind Assassin, which immediately engages the mind because of the connection of two seemingly contradictory qualities). The publisher was adamant. I told them that if they really were hell-bent on using assassin in a title that otherwise had nothing to do with the book, couldn't we at least call the book The Da Vinci Assassin, or The Sudoku Assassin? In the end, we compromised on Requiem for an Assassin, a title I think would be good for some other book but is unrelated to the one I wrote--beyond, again, the bare fact of the presence of an assassin in the story.

Now that I have my rights back and no longer have to make ridiculous compromises about these matters, I've given the books the titles I always wanted them to have--titles that actually have something to do with the stories, that capture some essential aspect of the stories, and that act as both vessel and amplifier for what's most meaningful in the stories. For me, it's like seeing these books for the first time in the frames they always deserved. It's exciting, satisfying, and even liberating. Have a look yourself and I hope you'll enjoy them.

*********************

Barry Eisler spent three years in a covert position with the CIA, then worked as a technology lawyer and startup executive in Silicon Valley and Japan, earning his black belt at the Kodokan International Judo Center along the way. Eisler's bestselling thrillers have won the Barry Award and the Gumshoe Award for Best Thriller of the Year, have been included in numerous "Best Of" lists, and have been translated into nearly twenty languages. To learn more, please visit www.barryeisler.com. Or Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter.

Product Description

Amazon Review

Book Description: John Rain is back. And “the most charismatic assassin since James Bond” (San Francisco Chronicle) is up against his most formidable enemy yet: the nexus of political, military, media, and corporate factions known only as the Oligarchy.

When legendary black ops veteran Colonel Scott “Hort” Horton tracks Rain down in Tokyo, Rain can’t resist the offer: a multi-million dollar payday for the “natural causes” demise of three ultra-high-profile targets who are dangerously close to launching a coup in America.

But the opposition on this job is going to be too much for even Rain to pull it off alone. He’ll need a detachment of other deniable irregulars: his partner, the former Marine sniper, Dox. Ben Treven, a covert operator with ambivalent motives and conflicted loyalties. And Larison, a man with a hair trigger and a secret he’ll kill to protect.

From the shadowy backstreets of Tokyo and Vienna, to the deceptive glitz and glamour of Los Angeles and Las Vegas, and finally to a Washington, D.C. in a permanent state of war, these four lone wolf killers will have to survive presidential hit teams, secret CIA prisons, and a national security state as obsessed with guarding its own secrets as it is with invading the privacy of the populace.

But first, they’ll have to survive each other.

The Detachment is what fans of Eisler, “one of the most talented and literary writers in the thriller genre” (Chicago Sun-Times), have been waiting for: the worlds of the award-winning Rain series, and of the bestselling Fault Line and Inside Out, colliding in one explosive thriller as real as today’s headlines and as frightening as tomorrow’s.
Personal Safety Tips from Assassin John Rain
 
(Written by Barry Eisler)

Barry Eisler
spent three years in a covert position with the CIA, then worked as a technology lawyer and start-up executive in Silicon Valley and Japan, earning his black belt at the Kodokan International Judo Center along the way. Eisler's bestselling John Rain thrillers have won the Barry Award and the Gumshoe Award for Best Thriller of the Year, have been included in numerous "Best Of" lists, and have been translated into nearly 20 languages.

Read on for personal safety tips from assassin John Rain:

All effective personal protection, all effective security, all true self-defense, is based on the ability and willingness to think like the opposition.

I'm writing this article on my laptop in a crowded coffee shop I like. There are a number of other people around me similarly engaged. I think to myself, If I wanted to steal a laptop, this would be a pretty good place to do it. You come in, order coffee and a muffin, sit, and wait. Eventually, one of these computer users is going to get up and make a quick trip to the bathroom. He'll be thinking, "Hey, I'll only be gone for a minute." He doesn't know that a minute is all I need to get up and walk out with his $3,000 laptop. (Note how criminals are adept at thinking like their victims. You need to treat them with the same respect.)

Okay. I've determined where the opposition is planning on carrying out his crime (this coffee shop), and I know how he's going to do it (snatch and dash). I now have options:

  • avoid the coffee shop entirely (avoid where the crime will occur);
  • secure my laptop to a chair with a twenty dollar Kensington security cable (avoid how the crime will occur--it's hard to employ bolt cutters unobtrusively in a coffee shop, or to carry away a laptop that has a chair hanging off it); and
  • hope to catch the thief in the act, chase him down, engage him with violence.
Of these three options, #2 makes the most sense for me. The first is too costly--I like this coffee shop and get a lot of work done here. The third is also too costly, and too uncertain. Why fight when you can avoid the fight in the first place? This is self-defense we're talking about, remember, self-protection. Not fighting, not melodrama. As for the second, yes, it's true these measures won't render the crime impossible. But what measures ever do? The point is to make the crime difficult enough to carry out that the criminal chooses to pursue his aims elsewhere. Yes, if 27 ninjas have dedicated their lives to stealing your laptop and have managed to track you to the coffee shop, they'll probably manage to get your laptop while you're in the bathroom even if you've secured it to a chair. But more likely, your opposition will be someone who is as happy stealing your laptop as someone else's.

By making yours the marginally more difficult target, you will encourage him to steal someone else's. Which brings us to an unpleasant, but vitally true, parable:

If you and your friend are jogging in the woods, and you get chased by a bear, you don't have to outrun the bear. You just have to outrun your friend.

Except at the level of very high-value executive protection (presidents, high-profile businesspeople, ambassadors and other dignitaries), you are not trying to outrun the bear. You are trying only to outrun your friend.

Let's combine these two concepts--thinking like the opposition, outrunning your friend--with an example from the realm of home security. And let's add an additional critical element: that all good security is layered.

If you wanted to burglarize a house, what would you look for? And what would you avoid?

Generally speaking, your principal objectives are to get cash and property, and to get away (home invasion is a separate subject, but is addressed, like all self-protection, by reference to the same principles). You'd start by looking at lots of houses. Remember, you're not trying to rob a certain address; you just want to rob a house. Which ones are dark? Which are set back from the road and neighbors? Are there any cars in the driveway? Lights and noise in the house? Signs of an alarm system? A barking dog?

Thinking like a burglar, you are now ready to implement the outer layer of your home security. By some combination of installing motion-sensor lights, keeping bushes trimmed to avoid concealment opportunities, putting up signs advertising an alarm system, having a dog around, keeping a car or cars in the driveway, leaving on appropriate lights and the television, and making sure there are no newspapers in the driveway or mail left on the porch when you're away, you help the burglar to decide immediately during his casing or surveillance phase that he should rob someone else's house.

If the burglar isn't immediately dissuaded by the outer layer, he receives further discouragement at the next layer in. He takes a closer look, and sees that you have deadbolt locks on all the doors, and that your advertisement was not a bluff--the windows are in fact alarmed. If he takes a crack at the doorjamb, he discovers that it's reinforced. If he tries breaking a window, he realizes the glass is shatter-resistant. Whoops--time to go somewhere else, somewhere easier.

Okay, the guy is stupid. He keeps trying anyway. Now the second layer of security described above, which failed to deter him, works to delay him. It's taking him a long time to get in. He's making noise. At some point, the time and noise might combine to persuade him to abort (back to deterrence). But if heinsists on plunging ahead, the noise has alerted you, and you have bought yourself time to implement further inner layers of security: accessing a firearm; calling the police; retreating to a safe room; most of all, preparing yourself mentally and emotionally for danger and possible violence.

Now another example, relating to personal protection from an overseas kidnapping attempt. Like everything else, this form of protection starts with you thinking like the bad guy. Your objective is to kidnap a foreigner. Not a particular foreigner (high-value targets are a separate problem, although again subject to the same principles), just any old foreigner. So what do you need to do to carry out your plan?

First, you need to pick a target. This part is easy--any foreigner will do. Next, you need to assess the foreigner's vulnerability. Where will you be able to grab him, and when? To answer these questions, you need to follow the target around. If he's punctual, a creature of habit, if he likes to travel the same routes to andfrom work at the same times every day, you will start to feel encouraged.

But what if instead, during the assessment stage, you see the target go out to his car and carefully check it for improvised explosive devices. Your immediate thought will be: Hard target. Security-conscious. Too difficult--kidnap someone else. If you're the potential target, do you see how your display of security consciousness becomes the outermost layer of your security? But suppose the would-be kidnapper wants to assess a bit further. Now he learns that you never travel the same route to and from work. You never come and go at the same times. He can't get a fix on your where and when. How is he going to plan a kidnapping now?

Note that, by putting yourself in the opposition's shoes, you have identified a behavior pattern in which he must engage before carrying out his crime: surveillance. Before you are kidnapped, you will be assessed. Assessment entails surveillance. Now you know what pre-incident behavior to look for. If you were trying to follow you, how would you go about it? That's what to look for.

Perhaps the would-be kidnapper will discover choke points - a certain bridge, for example--that you have to cross everyday on your way to the office. This would be a good place for him to lay an ambush. But because you know this too, you will be unusually alert as you approach potential choke points. As he watches your choke point behavior, he realizes again that you are security-conscious, and thus a poor choice for a target. Again, deterrence. If he is rash and acts at this point anyway, the inner layers of your security-locked and armored vehicle; defensive driving tactics; presence of a bodyguard; access to a firearm; again, most of all, preparing yourself mentally and emotionally for danger and possible violence--all have time to come into play.

Other examples: if you needed fast cash, where would you look to rob someone? Maybe on the potential victim's way from an ATM? If so, what kind of ATM would you pick? Where would you wait? What if you wanted to steal a car? Assuming you're not a pro who can pick locks and hot-wire ignitions, where would you go? Maybe outside a video store, or a dry cleaner's, a place where people leave the keys in the ignition because they'll "only be gone for a minute"? Now, armed with a better understanding of the criminal's goals and tactics, how should you behave to better protect yourself?

One common element you might see in all of this is the vital need for alertness, for situational awareness. Understanding where threats are likely to come from and how they are likely to materialize will help you properly tune your alertness. If you are not properly alert to a threat, you almost certainly will be unable to defend yourself against it when it materializes.

Notice that so far the discussion has included no mention of martial arts. This is because martial arts, self-defense, fighting, and combat, while related subjects, are not identical. The relationship and differences among these areas is outside the scope of this article. For now, suffice it to say that martial arts can be thought of as an inner layer of self-defense. If you have to use your martial arts moves, then almost certainly some outer layer of your security has been breached and you are in a worse position than you would have been had the outer layers held fast.

To put it another way: Thinking like the opposition; taking threats seriously and not being in denial about their existence; and maintaining proper situational awareness, are infinitely more cost effective for self-defense than is training in martial arts.

Note that I have been doing martial arts of one kind or another since I was a teenager. I love the martial arts for many reasons. I do not dispute and am not discussing their value, but rather am emphasizing their cost-effectiveness in achieving a given objective--here, effective personal protection. No matter what her martial arts skills, the person who recognizes in advance and can therefore steer clear of an ambush has a much better chance of surviving it than does the person who wanders into the ambush and then has to fight her way out.

So practice thinking like the opposition, and you'll have a better chance of lasting as long as John Rain.

This article also appears in Crimespree Issue #4
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Barry Eisler spent three years in a covert position with the CIA, then worked as a technology lawyer and startup executive in Silicon Valley and Japan, earning his black belt at the Kodokan International Judo Center along the way. Eisler's bestselling thrillers have won the Barry Award and the Gumshoe Award for Best Thriller of the Year, have been included in numerous "Best Of" lists, and have been translated into nearly twenty languages. The first book in Eisler's assassin John Rain series, Rain Fall, is now a minor motion picture (kidding, it's reasonably major) starring Gary Oldman. To learn more, please visit www.barryeisler.com. Or Facebook, MySpace, or Twitter. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Miss Chloe S. Batten on 27 Sep 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
John Rain is back as the lethal Japanese-American assassin in Barry Eisler's latest espionage epic. Motivated by personal losses (and the huge amounts of cash on offer) Rain returns to what he does best and accepts a lucrative contract to kill three targets. Unable to carry out the job single-handedly he puts together THE DETACHMENT. His ex-marine buddy and sniper Dox is the only one he can really trust in the group as the other two seem slightly suspect to say the least. The suspense is as good as the action as they battle seemingly insurmountable government forces to terminate their objectives. Uncovering inner turmoil and a political conspiracy on the way the plot thickens and the suspense and pace mount to a gripping conclusion.

The locations and characters are brilliantly described as the team moves from one exotic location to another. The writing is great with a perfect blend of story, action and character development. Rain reminds me of one of Eric Van Lustbader's main characters in that they were both of mixed heritage and were unstoppable assassins, unfortunately I can't remember the name (In my defence I did read the Lustbader book about 25 years ago).

One I honestly couldn't put down, long live the Rain, man!
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Bill Bell on 19 Dec 2011
Format: Paperback
John Rain is a formidable character. When in Tokyo! Nota Bene. The first books were full of Tokyo flavor and Rains violent persona. Then something went terrible wrong. He was placed in other continents and cities. He got a child and a good friend and the plots where far fetched and unbelievable. Now Eisler is back with another book starring John Rain and it suffers the same problem. John Rain has become a team player with four other characters. Eisler writes in first person sometimes(Rain), and in third person and sometimes he goes into their heads and it just doesen't work. The action takes place in USA and the plot is a mainstream, conspiracy one. If Rain and friends doesn't stop the conspiracy, the world can blow up etc... Average. Wished Rain stayed in Tokyo and didn't take on the whole Us army and it's allies, but solved more local problems with his wit and knowhow.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Mindelbrot on 26 Sep 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I found The Detachment a great read, finding it both imaginative and authoritative. I was involved emotionally by a well-shaped narrative and found myself able to appreciate the fully dimensional characters despite the reasonable paucity of personal background with relation to the main protaganists. A thoroughly satisfying read which skipped by regardless of whether the chapter was action or personal character negotiation.

Happy, satisfied customer.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Austin Murphy on 29 Nov 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Being fair, this was my first look at this author and character, however it took me some time to get into this book. I would read some more of his books and hope I can become acquainted better with his characters.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By cloudburst3 on 3 Dec 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I downloaded this book to my kindle not having read any of Barry Eisler books and I am glad I did.The book summary sounded just what I wanted to read and I was not disappointed.There is no preamble with this book; it starts fast and the pace continues throughout.It is a 'violent' book actually as deaths occur matter of factly, but it never feels gratutious.The characters are all killers but their personalities are developed as the story unfolds and an empathy is established with the reader so that as the story twists and turns you forget they are the 'bad' guys.Or were they ever the bad guys?
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Maggie J on 5 Jan 2012
Format: Paperback
I love this book! Having read all Barry Eisler's other Rain and Treven novels I feel I know the characters, and have thoroughly enjoyed the dynamic between them in this book. It's an exciting story, you never know who to trust and you really care about the characters. Add to that Eisler's enjoyable writing style - and it's a winner!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By CEEAITCHJAY on 30 Oct 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
No point in writing reams about Rain!
To a new reader it would help if you bought Eisler's earlier novels involving Rain but if you read this you will be prompted to do just that.
How he constantly thinks of new assasination methods is beyond me and makes his books unmissable.
Buy, buy, buy!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Roger Cave on 1 Dec 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've read a couple of Eisler's John Rain novels and always enjoy them, and this one was no different.

I don't want to give too much away, but Rain (an assassin) becomes embroilled in a plot, which he seemingly can't escape from. He teams up with the other men (the Detachment as they become), two from the CIA (sort of) and his old friend Dox. The question is, once they get themselves into the plot, can they get themselves back out.

Hugely entertaining, with good pace and not only action, but some thoughtful stuff too. The ending seemed a little subdued, as I felt the story could have continued, but no doubt Eisler may have something in store fro Rain off the back of this book.

It's well worth a look, as Eisler has a good writing style, and Rain is a solid character to base the books around. I woould thoroughly recommend the book.
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