The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs: Devices, Tools and F... and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more


or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering.
Trade in Yours
For a £2.27 Gift Card
Trade in
More Buying Choices
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Colour:
Image not available

 
Start reading The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs: Devices, Tools and Flows (Edn Series for Design Engineers) [Paperback]

Clive Maxfield

RRP: £45.99
Price: £41.08 & FREE Delivery in the UK. Details
You Save: £4.91 (11%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
In stock.
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Want it tomorrow, 1 Oct.? Choose Express delivery at checkout. Details

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition £39.03  
Paperback £41.08  
Trade In this Item for up to £2.27
Trade in The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs: Devices, Tools and Flows (Edn Series for Design Engineers) for an Amazon Gift Card of up to £2.27, which you can then spend on millions of items across the site. Trade-in values may vary (terms apply). Learn more

Book Description

12 April 2004 Edn Series for Design Engineers
Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are devices that provide a fast, low-cost way for embedded system designers to customize products and deliver new versions with upgraded features, because they can handle very complicated functions, and be reconfigured an infinite number of times. In addition to introducing the various architectural features available in the latest generation of FPGAs, The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs also covers different design tools and flows. This book covers information ranging from schematic-driven entry, through traditional HDL/RTL-based simulation and logic synthesis, all the way up to the current state-of-the-art in pure C/C++ design capture and synthesis technology. Also discussed are specialist areas such as mixed hardward/software and DSP-based design flows, along with innovative new devices such as field programmable node arrays (FPNAs). Clive 'Max' Maxfield is a bestselling author and engineer with a large following in the electronic design automation (EDA)and embedded systems industry. In this comprehensive book, he covers all the issues of interest to designers working with, or contemplating a move to, FPGAs in their product designs. While other books cover fragments of FPGA technology or applications this is the first to focus exclusively and comprehensively on FPGA use for embedded systems.

Frequently Bought Together

The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs: Devices, Tools and Flows (Edn Series for Design Engineers) + Digital System Design with VHDL
Price For Both: £96.07

Buy the selected items together
  • Digital System Design with VHDL £54.99

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Product details


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs describes not only everything you need to know to start designing FPGAs, but also how the art came to be in its current state...Unlike many in the EDA industry, Maxfield doesn't forget that chips go on boards: One chapter looks at PCB considerations of FPGA Design...I must admit that when I first saw the book, I imagined reading it would be something of a slog as so many technical books are. Upon opening the book, I was delighted to discover that Maxfield's writing style actually makes reading the book more of a romp in the part. There are portions of the book that I intended to just scan but found myself sucked into reading in full...The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs will be a great source of knowledge to the FPGA newcomer. It will also provide new insights and broaden the veteran designer's knowledge of the field. But most of all it is a fun and engaging read for anyone for whom electronics design is more than a 9-to-5 job. It is a good buy at the $49.95 list price - PRINTED CIRCUIT DESIGN & MANUFACTURE JULY 2004 If you've never read any books written by Clive "Max" Maxfield, then you're in for a treat. True to form, his latest book on FPGAs is enjoyable to read. Yet it's also rich in the technical details that any modern designer would need...He covers all of the issues that anyone working with FPGAs or thinking about moving to them would need to know...As with most of Max's work, this book's appendix is a treasure trove of background tutorials...While this book is well suited for young engineers - anyone with less than the prerequisite five years in FPGA or ASIC design - it also offers many topics that will interest the experienced designer - Wireless Systems Design, August 2004 ...a must-read book for those designers who either want an introduction to designing with FPGAs or need to broaden their understanding of the EDA tools available for such applications. Maxfield writes in a easy-to-read style, and provides insightful and diverse information for designers and curious readers alike. The author has never forgotten his designer roots, and the book is full of examples and chapters dedicated to such applications as gigabit transceivers, linear-feedback-shift registers, and integration of third-party cores. -- EDN, 5/21/2004

About the Author

Clive 'Max' Maxfield received a BS in Control Engineering from Sheffield Polytechnic, England in 1980. He began his career as a mainframe CPU designer for International Computers Limited (ICL) in Manchester, England. Max now finds himself a member of the technical staff (MTS) at Intergraph Electronics, Huntsville, Alabama. Max is the author of dozens of articles and papers appearing in magazines and at technical conferences around the world. Max's main area of interest are currently focused in the analog, digital, and mixed-signal simulation of integrated circuits and multichip modules.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Explore More
Concordance
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet on Amazon.co.uk.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)
Amazon.com: 3.5 out of 5 stars  24 reviews
40 of 42 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great general culture book, but lacking technical content. 29 July 2004
By Patrick Van Esch - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I gave this book 3 stars, but maybe it should get more, because on one hand this is a great book to read, and you learn a lot of what I call general culture from it. But I missed mostly of what I wanted from it so I got frustrated during the reading.

Let me explain. I'm an electrical engineer with quite some experience, mainly in the analogue/physics/microwave etc... area, but I completely 'missed the FPGA train'. Soon I'll have to plunge into FPGA design, and I thought that this book (together with a VHDL textbook) would get me started. I read through the book from cover to cover (it is an easy and fun read!), and I have the feeling that I can now go and chat with just any experienced FPGA designer, I'll be able to keep up appearances over the coffee, I'm aware of what happens on the market, what were former habits, what's trendy right now etc...

But if that same designer takes me to his office to really discuss technical issues I'll flunk. All the content in the book is on the superficial coffee corner discussion level (which doesn't mean it isn't interesting to know this). Reading the book replaces discussions over coffee during the last five years with FPGA design engineers. But a book that is supposed to be a design guide, should, to me, include concrete, realistic, worked-out case studies: put the blah-blah to work. And that's what's terribly missing in this book: no worked-out examples, exercises, problems, and that's what I thought the book was going to offer me, to get me started. And that's what disappointed me, hence 3 stars.

On the positive side, it is true that - if somehow you manage to learn to really work with FPGAs somewhere else - the general culture provided in this book is formidable. In fact, I think this book is perfect for non-technical managers who have to take high-level decisions and have to learn to talk to their technically minded collaborators. But it is not enough for the technical manager who has to take architectural decisions and it is utterly frustrating for the engineer in the trenches if he doesn't get his working knowledge elsewhere.

Also the fun style of the book, which has almost no prerequisites concerning electronics, is a great plus. So if this book were titled 'Boost up your general culture about FPGAs' I'd have given it easily 5 stars.
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The Middle-Manager's Guide to Sounding Like You Know Something About FPGAs 13 May 2007
By towSaint - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I am an EE with no previous FPGA experience. Some of the reviews here made me think this book might be a good stepping stone. Completely wrong. The title of the book is misleading, in my opinion. For the engineer wanting to get started using FPGAs this book is utterly without merit. Why did I give it any stars then? Well, I'm assuming that the nebulously defined 'wide audience' the book was really written for is non-technical managers who need enough of an understanding of common acronyms and terminology to impress their even-less-technical bosses, accounting, and HR people and to be able to relay communications without garbling the message too badly. The author devotes a tremendous amount of space to making sure you know how to pronounce the relevant acronyms like 'FPGA', 'SRAM', etc. The author also sedulously avoids any 'brass tacks' kind of information in an effort to keep his book from becoming obsolete too soon. In my opinion this strategy is like making something useless to begin with, so it won't *become* useless later. Having read this book (it's a fast read: low information density, much repetition, large margins (for acronym pronunciation and largely irrelevant history trivia), and big print.) I think a manager needing a survey of FPGAs and especially terminology might find this useful. To anyone wanting to actually implement something in an FPGA look somewhere else.
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars So, tell me again what I am supposed to do??? 19 Jan 2005
By Donald W. Miklovic - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
All these nifty block diagrams and acronymes, but I still don't know how to work with an FPGA. I would have liked to see at least one concrete example of how to make an FPGA do something. This book is not for the beginner in FPGA's.
16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Much More than a Cookbook 1 Aug 2004
By R. G Munden - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I would guess that Clive "Max" Maxfield has been an electronics

enthusiast for a very long time. He seems to enjoy the history

of the industry as much as the current state of the art. His

latest book, "The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs" describes not

only everything you need to know to get started designing state

of the art FPGAs, but also how the art came to be in its current

state.

This book does not cover the constantly changing details of how

to run any particular FPGA design tool. That information comes with the tools. Instead, it talks about all the available tools and design methodologies - which will help you decide which tools to look at.

I must admit that when I first saw the book, I imagined reading

it would be something of a slog through the swamp as so many

technical books are. Upon first opening the book, I was delighted to discover that Maxfield's writing style actually makes reading the book more of a romp in the park. There are portions of the book that I intended to just scan but found myself sucked into reading in full. I found chapters such as the origins of FPGAs and ASICs to be interestingly informative and nostalgic at the same time. Subject headings such as "We were all so much younger then" and "Choosing the best logic simulator in the world" were too irresistible to skim over.

In short, "The Design Warrior's Guide to FPGAs" will be great

source of knowledge to the FPGA newcommer. It will also provide

new insights and broaden the veteran designer's knowledge of the

field. But most of all, it is a fun and engaging read for anyone

for whom electronics design is more than a 9 to 5 job.
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's not too bad, but only for specific audiences 3 Aug 2007
By Thomas - Published on Amazon.com
Format:Paperback
I read through this book on a whim a while ago when I started getting into reconfigurable computing, and since then have gone up the 'food chain' so to speak. This book isn't that bad, in fact for total neophytes to FPGAs and EDA in general, it's a fairly lightweight but pretty comprehensive introduction.

It includes a fairly basic overview of the FPGA architectures, HDLs, C/C++/SystemC design flows, a brief description of simulation and verification, and other random tidbits here and there. Almost no math required, just a high level introduction and overview.

That said, it probably is best targeted towards business / marketing types who don't want to be total idiots to their engineering staffs. Also undergraduates or new engineers who want a light introduction to the FPGA industry and design process might benefit.

Anyone obviously who is already a design engineer or whatever won't find much use here. Then again I would question why someone with lots of experience would read a book titled "Design Warrior's Guide." Shouldn't you guys be reading the latest papers from DAC or ICCAD?

For a more technical overview of EDA in general, a good series is the EDA for IC Design series. But it's probably too technical for the audience this book is targeting.
Were these reviews helpful?   Let us know

Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
No discussions yet

Ask questions, Share opinions, Gain insight
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions
   


Look for similar items by category


Feedback