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The Deportees Paperback – 7 Aug 2008


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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (7 Aug. 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099507056
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099507055
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 1.6 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 170,051 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Roddy Doyle was born in Dublin in 1958. He is the author of eleven acclaimed novels including The Commitments, The Snapper, and The Van, two collections of short stories, Rory & Ita, a memoir about his parents, and most recently, The Guts. He won the Booker Prize in 1993 for Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha.

Product Description

Review

"Writing at the top of his form...Doyle proves a brilliant, offbeat Dublin diplomat. He imagines, with humour and humanity, the difficulties involved in being Irish and in being foreign and unassimilated in Ireland. He has the sharpest eye, the wildest sense of humour and the most benevolent heart" (Observer)

"Constantly inventive, extremely funny and illustrate his ability to get under the skin of ordinary people" (Daily Mail)

"It's as if Roddy Doyle went out on the streets for you with his own microphone and camcorder... You're there, whether you want to be or not" (Maeve Binchy The Times)

"The evident sincerity and unrepentant good cheer of these stories will carry the reader a long way with them" (Independent on Sunday)

"Much to admire and enjoy" (Sunday Times)

Review

'could stand tall in any literary company, told with Doyle's trademark lightness of touch'

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3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Ian Wood, Author of 'Here's 2 Absent Fathers' on 10 Jan. 2008
Format: Hardcover
`The Deportees' is an anthology of stories written by Roddy Doyle for `Metro Eireann', a newspaper started by, and aimed at immigrants to Ireland. So rather than be a straight anthology of short stories, the stories are themed either as a story written about an immigrant to Ireland or a native Irishman coming to terms with his newly found multicultural society. As a nation the Irish are used to supplying not receiving immigrant labour and receiving not supplying racial prejudice, it is undoubtedly an interesting paradox, but can Doyle's unquestionable talent make any sense of it.

The first story of the collection `Guess Who's Coming for the Dinner' is probably the most successful and certainly the most entertaining. Larry Linnane has always prided himself on the his daughters sensibilities and that they could be trusted to always independently do the right thing, he has never had any need to worry, until that is, one of them brings a `Black Fella' home for dinner. Larry's awkwardness and the care that he chooses his next clumsy fopaux is a wonder to behold.

The title story involves Jimmy Rabbitte, the man who brought `The Commitments' to the world starting a new multicultural band `The Deportees' using the Dust Bowl songs of Woody Guthrie to spell out the immigrants lot to their hosts, willing or otherwise. It is perhaps that this is such a good premise or possibly the weight of following a character from such a successful novel as `The Commitments' that means this story was never going to live up to its expectation.

Of the other stories `57% Irish' is possibly hampered by its Irvine Welch brand of surrealism not fitting nicely on Doyle's shoulders.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By BookWorm TOP 500 REVIEWER on 1 May 2009
Format: Paperback
A book of short stories with a common theme - immigrants in Ireland - The Deportees is an enjoyable read. The stories were originally published in installments in a magazine, so they are composed of short chapters which keep the pace fast and make for easy reading. It means it can be read in a disjointed way, ideal for commuting.

The stories feature a range of characters and are told both from the point of view of immigrants and of native Irish people affected by immigration. They're all quite lighthearted, though with serious issues at the core. There's even a ghost story among them.

On the whole an enjoyable enough read. I'm not a big fan of short stories because I miss having a continuing story throughout the book, but this collection is one of the better ones.
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By Craobh Rua VINE VOICE on 17 Aug. 2011
Format: Paperback
Roddy Doyle was born in Dublin in 1958 and saw his first novel, "The Commitments" published in 1987. It was later adapted for the big screen, a version that saw Star Trek's Colm Meaney and a very young Andrea Corr among the cast. Doyle went on to win the Booker Prize in 1993 with "Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha".

Doyle begins the book with a short foreword, noting the changes he's seen in Dublin (and in the Irish) since the early 1990s. "It happened", he says, "somewhere in the mid-90s. I went to bed in one country and woke up in a different one." Having once been a country that exported its people, it now had a healthy immigrant population of its own. (Now, admittedly, it's like we're back where we started). "The Deportees" is a collection of short stories - all of which first appeared in Metro Eireann - that takes this change as its central theme.

The book's highlight, for me, was its "title track". As well as being the book's longest story, it also features a familiar face : Jimmy Rabbite, the ex-manager of The Commitments. Jimmy's now 36, is married to Aoife and has three kids - with a fourth on the way. He's still mad about music, hates the Corrs - presumably on a musical level only - and answers to the name `Slim Shady'. The story sees him deciding to put a band together, with the members picked from Dublin 's immigrant community. (It'd have been great to find out how Jimmy's brothers and sisters were doing, and if Larrygogan was still alive. The only ex-Commitment who makes an appearance is Mikah Wallace, now quite possibly the world's grubbiest born-again Christian).

Of the remainder, there are two I'd give the nod to - although the others are by no means disappointing. `New Boy' follows Joseph's first day at school in Ireland.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By smhorse on 14 Oct. 2008
Format: Paperback
Roddy Doyle brings us up to date with the changing face of Celtic Tiger Dublin, including at least one well-known character, still on the hustle, from his much-acclaimed book "The Commitments", plus a whole host of immigrants whose scarily-amusing experiences are matched by the Dubliners who attempt to welcome them.

Recommended.
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Format: Paperback
The Deportees, written by Roddy Doyle contains several short/medium sized stories who always include one or several deportees in Ireland, interacting with the Irish.
The stories are all so different and fresh in style, humour and ideas, and we are constantly pushed to keep reading them.
Doyle manages to give us one of the most pleasant reads of the century, while at the same time giving us a great sociologycal approach about the Ireland of the beginning 'f the century.

A book that you won't regret reading if you're into great sense of humour, a compilation of short/medium sized stories, and wanting to learn more about the Irish, and their "deportees", because multiculturality, as the author proves, may be something brilliant.
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