Watch now

The Deep Blue Sea [Blu Ra... has been added to your Basket
Quantity:1

Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Basket
£8.70
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: hunting_for_a_bargain
Add to Basket
£11.00
& FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20.00. Details
Sold by: HarriBella.UK.Ltd
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Colour:
  • The Deep Blue Sea [Blu Ray] [Blu-ray]
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
      

The Deep Blue Sea [Blu Ray] [Blu-ray]

66 customer reviews

Price: £7.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
17 new from £5.73 3 used from £6.98 1 collectible from £13.20

Amazon Instant Video

Watch The Deep Blue Sea instantly from £2.49 with Amazon Instant Video
Also available to rent on Blu-ray from LOVEFiLM By Post
£7.00 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £20. Details Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Frequently Bought Together

The Deep Blue Sea [Blu Ray] [Blu-ray] + Only Lovers Left Alive [Blu-ray] [2014]
Price For Both: £15.00

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Product details

  • Actors: Rachel Weisz, Tom Hiddleston, Simon Russell Beale
  • Directors: Terence Davis
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region B/2 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: 12
  • Studio: Artificial Eye
  • DVD Release Date: 2 April 2012
  • Run Time: 98 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (66 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B006E1WORG
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 48,423 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Hester Collyer (Academy Award winner Rachel Weisz) leads a privileged life in 1950s London as the beautiful wife of high court judge Sir William Collyer (Simon Russell Beale). To the shock of those around her, she walks out on her marriage to move in with young ex-RAF pilot, Freddie Page (Tom Hiddleston), with whom she has fallen passionately in love. Set in post-war Britain this adaptation of Terence Rattigan s classic play, The Deep Blue Sea is a study of forbidden love, suppressed desire, and the fear of loneliness but is at heart a deeply moving love story. Stuck between the devil and the deep blue sea, what - or whom - should Hester choose? From acclaimed director Terence Davis

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

41 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Dariush Alavi on 2 Jan. 2012
Format: DVD
The stately, almost staccato pace of some of Terence Davies' films can make them difficult to watch; the technique occasionally feels like a none-too-subtle attempt to imbue scenes with an importance they might not otherwise possess. Fortunately, in The Deep Blue Sea, it works extremely well, helping to punctuate the shift between the past and the present, stave off sentimentality and reflect the main character's state of mind. Set soon after the Second World War, this adaptation of Terence Rattigan's play examines twenty-four hours in the life of Hester as she recovers from a failed suicide attempt and looks back on an ill-fated love affair with an RAF pilot. Rachel Weisz is mesmerising in the lead role - using an unusual accent and dreamy vocal delivery to suggest Hester's leap into unconventionality - but Simon Russell Beale and Tom Hiddleston (a rising star, if ever there was one) are equally affecting. A moving, melancholy and quite beautiful piece of work.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Keith M TOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 Nov. 2013
Format: DVD
This 2011 Terence Davies adaption of Terence Rattigan's play of the same name is another beautifully crafted, well-acted and emotionally engaging piece of work from one of the UK's finest film-makers and, although, for me, it does not quite rank with Davies' best work, it is nevertheless a film well worth seeing (certainly for anyone interested in Davies' work). In keeping with much (probably all, actually) of Davies' work, The Deep Blue Sea is a slow-moving, deeply felt and evocative slice of cinema, set during Davies' favourite era, 1950s post-war Britain and telling the tale, against a backdrop of 'repressed Englishness', of Rachel Weisz's Hester Collyer, her broken marriage to Simon Russell Beale's upstanding member of the judiciary, Sir William Collyer, and her obsessive, doomed love for Tom Hiddleston's war pilot, Freddie Page.

In trademark fashion, Davies' film opens with a sublime piece of cinematic poetry as cinematographer Florian Hoffmeister's camera pans slowly across a street (with Hester peering through a window) to the sumptuous, tremulous sounds of Barber's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra. Thereafter, this haunting, maudlin melody is repeated at key points in Davies' tale, whilst Hoffmeister's camera evokes the era with slow pans, lingering close-ups and hypnotic revolves (a brilliant example of the latter, dwelling on Hester and Freddie's naked, intertwined bodies), and taking in (trademark Davies) pub singalongs, the London tube (in flashback) during the blitz and ancient milk floats.

Acting-wise, Davies' cast is pretty much flawless.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Miss Scarlett on 13 Jun. 2014
Format: DVD
In a time in which British theatre was crushed and stifled by censorship, Terence Rattigan wrote this play, which shot straight to the heart about love, passion and society. Whilst fellow Terrence- the director Terrence Davies- brings out many of the plays undertones that I feel are lost in the 1955 film version and the 1994 BBC one, he also loses some threads and too heavily insists on the comparisons with Brief Encounter (even though the source play doesn't bear much resemblance).

Davies clearly has a festishistic love for post-war 1950s Britain; the drab and the gloom is lovingly shot. The dinginess means that Davies can pull Brief-Encounter moments, where the adulterous couple Hester (Rachel Weisz) and Freddie (Tom Hiddleston) illicitly steal kisses on the street. I enjoyed the pub songs; in particular a scene that cuts from a pub singing along to a romantic song from that era to Freddie and Hester dancing to a lush record of it. The daze and excitement of the affair is captured nicely.

The sense of a society still recovering from the war and still living off ration books is integral to the play so in that respect Davies is well-suited. However it's the story that gets a bit lost; as does the viewer. In order to escape its stage origins (the play takes place over the course of a night with the action set solely in the living room), Davies uses lots of flashbacks. So whilst in the play, we only find out that Freddie is not Hester's husband, as she has been pretending, but her lover, in the film it's clear from the start. They later include a dramatisation of a scene mentioned in the play, in which their landlady discovers the deception, but it seemed a bit pointless.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Adrian Ball on 23 Jan. 2013
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Terrence Rattigan’s romantic play set in a repressive post-war Britain takes place during one day in a dingy bedsit. Hester (Rachel Weisz) has left behind her passionless marriage to successful lawyer Sir William Collyer (Simon Russell-Beale) to continue her affair with handsome and dashing air force pilot Freddie Page (Tom Hiddlestone). Davies skilfully reworks Rattigan’s play into a series of short scenes that depict both the action during the day along with flashbacks leading to this moment in time. This multi-layered narrative works in the way memory does - in that one memory evokes associated memories for the characters.
All the performances are exceptional, especially those of the lead actors Rachel Weisz, Tom Hiddleston and Simon Russell-Beale. Barbara Jefford is wonderful as Collyer’s mother, warning Hester to ‘beware of passion, it always leads to something ugly’! It is not so much the dialogue as the movements and casual glances that give nuances to the characters.
The Deep Blue Sea is a wonderful portrayal of the ecstasy, passion and pain of being in love. The blu-ray release includes: a Commentary with Terence Davies and Ian Haydn Smith during which Davies refers to the earlier film version with Vivienne Leigh and Kenneth More which he says is terrible. A separate interview with Terence Davies. Unfortunately the audio is poor with Davies voice echoing around the room - it sounds as if the sound man forgot to turn on the microphone. There is also a Making of featurette with cast and crew and the Theatrical Trailer.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customer Discussions

This product's forum
Discussion Replies Latest Post
Subtitles? 1 24 Feb 2013
See all discussions...  
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 

Search Customer Discussions
   



Feedback