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The Decolonization of International Law: State Succession and the Law of Treaties (Oxford Monographs in International Law) Hardcover – 27 Dec 2007


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (27 Dec. 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199217629
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199217625
  • Product Dimensions: 23.6 x 2.8 x 15.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,972,959 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

Matthew Craven's excellent study...does succeed very well in demonstrating the tensions in international law laid bare by the post-war process of decolonization (and therefore hidden by imperialism), and it should...come as no surprise that those tensions played out in particular in the body of law dealing with the consequences of decolonization: the law on state succession... an incisive analysis of state succession and academic debates on the topic, the work is unparalleled...Matthew Craven is capable of writing with a keen eye for black letter detail but also of seeing bigger theoretical pictures. (Jan Klabbers, Finnish Yearbook of International Law (Vol XVIII))

About the Author

Matthew Craven is Professor of International Law, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London

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Format: Hardcover
The Decolonization of International Law is one of the more interesting books I've read in IR / International Law canon. It seems to be part of a newer wave of experimental literature in IR / International Law that weaves together sociological, historical, and philosophical streams into a single narrative - so from a purely methodological approach, it is not just interesting but allows for a much more entertaining read. We get to see personal squabbles of lawyers as well as doctrinal disputes and diverse political agendas. The theme is also provocative - which, just to be incredibly reductionist, is that history matters in understanding international law, but that history should really take off in the wake of decolonization. So, on the one hand, the author has challenged the orthodox approaches to provide a much more nuanced understanding of the dynamics at play, but on the other hand, seems to have found a way to do a deeply anti-imperialist/anti-colonial argument that doesn't send us packing for the pre-WW1 era (or World War eras for that matter).

Definitely worth a read, and maybe one of those books down the road that will end up pushing scholarship in new directions.
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