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The Death of a Child Hardcover – 26 May 2011

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Product details

  • Hardcover: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Continuum (26 May 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1441183035
  • ISBN-13: 978-1441183033
  • Product Dimensions: 14.5 x 1.9 x 22.3 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 460,121 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

More About the Author

Dorothy Rowe is a clinical psychologist and writer who is renowned for her work on how we create meaning, and how the meanings we create determine what we do. Her application of this understanding to the problems of depression and of fear has changed many people's lives for the better, and has caused many mental health professionals to think more carefully about how they deal with people who are suffering great mental distress. She writes regularly for newspapers and magazines, appears frequently in the media, and is the author of over 15 books, the most popular of which are Depression: The Way Out of Your Prison which is in its third edition, and Beyond Fear which is in its second edition. Her latest book My Dearest Enemy, My Dangerous Friend is a radical examination of what is often the most important relationships in our lives, our relationships with our siblings, was published by Routledge in April 2007. What Should I Believe?, considers why our beliefs about the nature of death and the purpose of life dominate our lives, and was published by Routledge in October 2008. Her latest book, Why We Lie, was published by HarperCollins in 2010.

Dorothy was born Dorothy Conn in Newcastle, NSW, Australia, in 1930. She was educated at Newcastle Girls' High and Sydney University where she obtained a degree in psychology and a Diploma of Education. She taught for three years, married in 1956 and her son Edward was born in 1957. She returned to teaching when he was two but was offered the opportunity to train as a school counsellor (educational psychologist) and went on to become Specialist for Emotionally Disturbed Children. At the same time she completed her Diploma in Clinical Psychology. In 1965 her marriage came to an end, and in 1968 she and Edward went to England. She accepted a National Health Service post at Whiteley Wood Clinic, Sheffield, which was the clinic attached to Sheffield University Department of Psychiatry where Alec Jenner, already well known for his work on the biological basis of mood change, had recently taken up his post as Professor of Psychiatry. This began Dorothy's close scrutiny of the research into the biological basis of mental disorder. She became an Associate of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and is now Emeritus Associate of the Royal College.

Alec Jenner suggested to Dorothy that her research PhD topic should be 'Psychological aspects of regular mood change'. Quite serendipitously, the psychologist Don Bannister was busy introducing British psychologists to the work of George Kelly and Personal Construct Theory. Dorothy discovered that she had always been a personal construct psychologist without knowing it. Kelly had developed a technique called repertory grids which enabled the researcher to examine the meanings which an individual had created around a particular subject or situation. Patrick Slater, a psychologist at the Institute of Psychiatry in London, provided invaluable help to Dorothy in her research by his development of computer software which analysed grids.

In 1971 Dorothy completed her PhD, and in 1972 she went to Lincolnshire to set up and head the Lincolnshire Department of Clinical Psychology. Dorothy obtained a research grant which enabled her to continue her research. This research became the basis of her first book The Experience of Depression, now called Choosing Not Losing. Her second book The Construction of Life and Death (The Courage to Live) was published in 1982. A chance discussion with the manager of a health food shop led to her third book, Depression: The Way Out of Your Prison, now in its third edition. This book won the Mind Book of the Year Award in 1984. More books followed.

In 1986 Dorothy left the National Health Service to become self-employed. She moved to Sheffield where she lived for nine years. In 1995 she moved to London where she still lives. She writes regularly for Openmind, and intermittently for other publications. She is frequently interviewed on radio and television, and she has a great many conversations with journalists who phone her for advice and information.

Product Description

Review

… a valuable collection not only for the 3,000 families affected by the death of a child each year in the United Kingdom, but for all those who seek to understand the dynamic and structure of grief… The collection as a whole provides our pain-denying culture with a new map of mourning. --Times Literary Supplement

… a valuable collection not only for the 3,000 families affected by the death of a child each year in the United Kingdom, but for all those who seek to understand the dynamic and structure of grief… The collection as a whole provides our pain-denying culture with a new map of mourning. --Times Literary Supplement

About the Author

Peter Stanford is a writer, broadcaster and biographer, whose books include biographies of Lord Longford, C Day-Lewis, Cardinal Hume and The Devil as well as The Extra Mile. A former editor of the Catholic Herald, he makes and presents TV and radio programmes, some based on his books. He is a frequent contributor to The Daily Telegraph, The Independent on Sunday and The Observer and has a regular column in The Tablet.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By NXH on 2 Jun. 2011
Format: Hardcover
"The Death of a Child" was not an easy read for me, having experienced the loss of our daughter, Joy, so recently in December 2010.

Joy had been diagnosed in utero with Trisomy 18. The expectation had been that she would be stillborn, or at best, that she would survive minutes because of her congenital heart defect coupled with a diaphragmatic hernia. Joy proceeded to live for 2-1/2 days. Meeting Joy alive meant watching her die, and with the experience of death so raw in my life, it was difficult reading of loss after loss in "The Death of a Child".

However, every story in "The Death of a Child" carried within it not only pain, but also hope. Every story talked of the beauty of the life lost to death, and in doing so, defies the power of death.

Reading this book made me realise that I have a choice: I can either let grief corrode some or all of me by attempting to bury it or I can embrace grief with a childlike faith that it may become a part of me but it will never consume me.

I am so grateful to Peter Stanford, the parents and siblings for sharing their journeys and to Continuum for publishing this book.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Ralph Yule on 2 July 2011
Format: Hardcover
I purchased this book to help me get through a very sad and difficult time, which it has. I would recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Maribelle on 30 Sept. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book might more accurately be called "How posh people do the lighter end of child death and adult death". People in this book send their children to boarding schools and call up private gynaecologists in the middle of the night. According to this book, child death includes adult death and occurs disproportionately in white aristocratic circles. They utter some terrible cliches and articulate a hierachy of grief, saying "at least it wasn't X" or "at least not Y" - so for readers for whom X or Y is the case, this is galling. The section at the end of the book by a psychologist is remote and unrecognisable. The advice is unhelpful. The attitudes to disabled people, especially to a diagnosis of Down syndrome, are terrible and ignorant. The editor is completely absent from the book, so I'm not sure what the point was of his name being first on the cover. He wrote not one word. According to this book no actual child is murdered by paedophiles, no baby dies of SIDS, medical negligence doesn't exist, and the law, medicine and local community scarcely exist either. It posits a view of bereavement that makes it an individual character flaw. I wouldn't recommend this book to anyone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By trelissa on 1 Feb. 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have lost three children - 15 years ago, and everyone avoids talking about this, so it has stayed with me. A number of people share their experiences, it is sensitively written. This book was wonderful, sensitively written, and incorporates how people recovered and the different approaches they had to the experience, I found it an incredible tool for my own self healing process.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful By P. R. Catterall on 14 Nov. 2011
Format: Hardcover
This is one of those books that I found so emotionally impactful that I could only read a chapter at a time.
It is not depressing - quite the opposite. It really helped me realise how lucky and blessed I am to have healthy children and to appreciate my life more.
The essays deal with the stages of tragic loss through to recovery and dealing with the deep associated feelings. I can recommend every household to have a copy on the shelf for anytime anyone feels down and in need of putting things into persepctive.
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