The Daylight Gate (Hammer) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Daylight Gate has been added to your Basket
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is in nice condition, clean with no missing pages and minimal markings. The pages may be slightly dog eared but overall in great shape. It is fulfilled by Amazon which means it is eligible for Amazon Prime and Super Saver Shipping.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Daylight Gate Hardcover – 16 Aug 2012

95 customer reviews

See all 17 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£9.99
£2.88 £0.01
£9.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders with at least £10 of books. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Daylight Gate + Lighthousekeeping + The Powerbook
Price For All Three: £27.97

Buy the selected items together



Product details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Hammer (16 Aug. 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0099561859
  • ISBN-13: 978-0099561859
  • Product Dimensions: 2.5 x 14 x 21 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (95 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 235,759 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jeanette Winterson was born in Manchester and read English at Oxford, during which time she wrote her first novel, the Whitbread award winning Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit. Tanglewreck, Jeanette's first novel for children, was published to great critical acclaim in 2006. In the same year she was awarded an OBE for services to literature.

Product Description

Review

"

If you like her other novels, you will adore this. She has done her homework... the beauty of the writing, exemplary in its pared-down simplicity. It’s so seductive that by the middle I was hooked.

" (Independent)

"Sharp-eyed view of history... Winterson is at her best her when she’s dealing with real horrors." (Observer)

"This is a dazzling book. Winterson is a deft storyteller and a writer of wonderful economy. Even in a book as melodramatic as this, she manages to convey character and setting with so few words that you scarcely notice it has been done... Winterson does all that any Hammer reader would want - and probably too much for some squeamish types - as well as writing a novel of subtlety and depth. It is also, amid the blood, mud and violence, intensely poetic. The imagery of the wild land with its dark towers and possessed creatures - animal and human - underpins a story about love and death and the possibility of unseen worlds. It is one of the very few contemporary novels that I actually wished were longer." (Literary Review)

"This I ought to say, is a book worth reading – utterly compulsive, thick with atmosphere and dread, but sharp intelligence too...Ultimately she combines compelling history and poetic dialogue with suspense...This rather more sophisticated story would make a particularly vivid film." (Telegraph)

"

Beautifully written.

" (Independent on Sunday)

Book Description

A new Hammer novel, and a Top Ten bestseller in hardcover. A tale of magic, superstition, conscience and ruthless murder, by one of the UK's most acclaimed literary writers.

Inside This Book

(Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ceiniog on 19 Feb. 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you have read (and enjoyed) "Mist over Pendle" by Robert Neill, as I have, then I don't think you will like "The Daylight Gate." Both are based loosely on the events leading up to the witchcraft trials of the early seventeenth century in Lancashire. Their timelines overlap but are not coincident - "The Daylight Gate" starts with an event that occurs two-thirds of the way through "Mist over Pendle" and ends with the execution of the witches, while "Mist over Pendle" ends with the arrest of the witches. My main problem is that, whereas Robert Neill gives rational and plausible explanations of the "witchcraft," Jeanette Winterson seems to imply that there are really supernatural forces at work. In addition, the Lesbian relationship introduced by her seems to me to be gratuitous, unnecessary, and unlikely.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Sam Quixote TOP 500 REVIEWER on 25 Aug. 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
SPOILERS

Alice Nutter is a witch but one of the good ones who uses her powers to keep her looking young and letting the poor live on her land for free. But it turns out one of the poor wretches living on her land is one of the bad witches - who also used to be Alice's girlfriend! But she's all old and wrinkly because The Devil chose Alice instead of her. This might seem important but it's a plot point that's never really built upon so it means absolutely nothing. I mean, is youthfulness purely the only benefit of letting the Devil roger you? How about better powers like immortality?

While "The Daylight Gate" is based on real events - the Pendle Witch Trials of 1612 in Lancaster, England - Jeanette Winterson isn't above throwing in some flashback scenes showing a couple of the characters actually doing witch-like stuff, thus giving credence to the ninnies who went around pointing their puritanical fingers at half wits and screaming WITCH! So some of the accused witches were real witches which means... they were right to stand trial? After all the bad witch does try and kill her prosecutor.

Winterson also throws in some not-sexy-at-all group sex scenes and has children being raped throughout all of which amounts to her stern message to the reader - my, things are grim aren't they? Yes Jeanette they are. And?

There's a not-at-all romantic sub plot involving a fictional member of the Gunpowder Plot who somehow manages to survive the brutal torture - if you enjoy lengthy descriptions of torture, you'll love this book! - to escape to France only to return for his sister and Alice, both of whom turn him down leaving him to go to London where he stares out of a window. Effective sub-plot isn't it?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Roman Clodia TOP 100 REVIEWER on 22 May 2013
Format: Paperback
I've loved a lot of Winterson's writing, and have enjoyed other books in this Hammer series - but sadly this combination just doesn't work here. Taking her cue from the real case of the Pendle witches, Winterson pulls together a heady brew of Satanism, anti-Catholicism, rape and sexual violence, torture and death.

The problem is that there's far too much going on in such a short novella, and that the whole thing gets increasingly convoluted as stray characters walk in and out. We have incursions, for example, from the retired Shakespeare making cryptic comments about magic, John Dee and Ned Kelley casting spells and appearing both in the flesh and after death, a lesbian love-affair (this is Winterson, after all!), an ex-Gunpowder Plot conspirator, and a magic elixir of youth...

The narrative shifts between `witches' as poor women who are victims of anti-female, anti-Catholic prejudices - and real witches who have sold their souls to the devil, which tends to dilute any political message that the text might want to make. It's also extremely disappointing that the one boon our `real' witch has is the aforesaid magic elixir of youth which keeps her young and beautiful...

So I'm afraid this is a disappointing read which is actually a bit incoherent. There's no historical sense of the seventeenth century, and the gory sex `n' torture scenes feel a bit gratuitous and sensational. An interesting experiment from Ms Winterson but, sadly, not one which worked for me.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By S Riaz HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 1 Oct. 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This novella length read is based on the most notorious of English witch trials - and also the first to be documented - that of the Lancashire (or Pendle) witches in 1612. I know virtually nothing about these events, so I cannot comment on how realistic an account this is, but they are interesting for several reasons; not least because one of the 'witches' on trial was a woman of higher social status and wealth than usual. Winterson weaves a tale around these events, although it is a slightly confusing and extremely dark version that she portrays.

The book begins with pedlar John Law who is taking a short cut through Boggart's Hole in Pendle Forest. It is close to dusk, the so-called 'daylight gate'. He falls and, as he struggles up, he finds Alizon Device in front of him. She curses him when he refuses to stop and then Law sees her grand-dam, old Demdike, with a dead lamb in her arms. Soon he stumbles into the local inn, having, it seems, lost his wits on the way. The women are part of a poverty ridden clan, who live on the land of wealthy Alice Nutter. Alice is single, independent and wealthy - having made her money from the invention of a dye which caught the eye of Elizabeth I - and that is enough to make people whisper 'witch'. For it is less than ten years since the Gunpowder Plot, when Catholic conspirators fled from London to Lancashire - one to Alice Nutter's home. James I is on the throne and Catholicism and witchcraft are seen as virtually interchangeable. Suspicion abounds and, of course, witchcraft is used as an excuse to abuse and violate the poor and defenceless in society.

Winterson does evoke a really atmospheric time and place, although it is not a period of history that I imagine many people would want to return to.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback