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The Day of Forever Paperback – 5 Jun 1995

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Paperback, 5 Jun 1995
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Product details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Flamingo; (Reissue) edition (5 Jun. 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0586089918
  • ISBN-13: 978-0586089910
  • Product Dimensions: 19 x 12.8 x 1.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,935,388 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

J.G. Ballard was born in 1930 in Shanghai, where his father was a businessman. After internment in a civilian prison camp, he and his family returned to England in 1946. He published his first novel, The Drowned World, in 1961. His 1984 bestseller Empire of the Sun won the Guardian Fiction Prize and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. It was later filmed by Steven Spielberg. His memoir Miracles of Life was published in 2008. J.G. Ballard died in 2009.

Product Description

About the Author

J. G. Ballard was born in 1930 in Shanghai, where his father was a businessman. After internment in a civilian prison camp, he and his family returned to England in 1946. He published his first novel, The Drowned World, in 1961. His 1984 bestseller Empire of the Sun won the Guardian Fiction Prize and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. His memoir Miracles of Life was published in 2008. J. G. Ballard died in 2009.


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rod Williams on 1 Nov. 2007
Format: Paperback
There are few people who have mastered the art of the SF short story to the extent that they do it consistently and brilliantly. An early example was HG Wells. My contemporary favourite is Ian Watson, and between them was JG Ballard. It's a tragedy that Ballard seems these days to have turned away from SF in the direction of mainstream and is now concentrating (one imagines exclusively) on novels.
There are those who debate whether Ballard's work was ever Science Fiction. Certainly, it confuses booksellers, as some place Ballard's work in the mainstream fiction section, some on the SF shelves, with a bet-hedging minority of shops placing selections in both camps.
Certainly works like `The Crystal World' which has certain scientific and fantastic elements within it, can be classed as SF while `Crash' (although listed in Pringle's `100 best SF Novels') is rather more difficult to place within an SF context.
I'm simply tempted to accept most Ballard as SF simply on the grounds that it doesn't really seem happy anywhere else.
I feel quite inadequate in even attempting to write some form of critique of Ballard's work, particularly his short stories. His novels, although hard work in some cases, are often more accessible.
These are some of Ballard's stories from the Early Nineteen Sixties (and one from '59) which deal - to a greater or lesser degree - with Time.
`The Day of Forever' is a strange tone-poem of piece, set on an earth in which Time, judged by the daily cycle of the world, has virtually stopped. In the town of Columbine Sept-Heures, it is constant twilight, a place where Halliday hopes to dream of the woman in Delvaux's surrealist painting, `The Echo'.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Craobh Rua VINE VOICE on 8 Sept. 2006
Format: Paperback
"A Case of Lone Star" is Kinky's second book, and was first published in 1987. As with his other books, Kinky has cast himself as the amateur-PI hero, while some of the other characters have been based on actual friends. As with real-life, the book's Kinky is a cigar-smoking, cat-loving, espresso-guzzling, whiskey-drinking, ex-country and western performer. He shares his loft on Vandam Street with his cat - who he occasionally leaves in charge. Conversations between Kinky and the cat tend to be somewhat one-sided, while the cat consistently refuses to answer the telephone.

Much of the action takes place in the Lone Star Caf' - a famous New York establishment that's played host to musical legends such as the Blues Brothers, the Rolling Stones and Kinky Friedman. The book opens with Kinky being contacted by Cleve, the manager of the Lone Star. Cleve has a slight problem with Larry Barkin, the frontman of Larry Barkin and the Barkin Brothers. Unfortunately, Larry isn't in any fit state to go on for the second set, having been murdered in his dressing room after the first set. A note that had arrived through the post the previous day - previously discounted as just fan mail - is now being viewed in a different light. It contained the lyrics of an old Hank Williams number that tied up with the scene of the crime. Bill Dick, the club's owner, asks Kinky to help with the club's woes.

Five people had been in Larry's dressing room after the first set. Three of them are known to Kinky : Chet Flippo (an old Texan friend of the Kinkster, who'd recently written a book about Hank Williams), Mike Simmons (an excellent country singer, who is not only partial to the sauce but also to Hank Williams' music) and Ratso (the Watson to Kinky's Sherlock).
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Martin English on 7 Dec. 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Iam a Big fan of Kinkys Music, Iam a Country music fan.
Kinkys books are Very interesting to read!!!!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 6 reviews
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Kinky vs. Hank Williams 5 Nov. 2001
By William Fare - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Kinky Friedman's 2nd detective novel, Case of Lone Star, is better than his first simply because it takes place in the music world, Kinky's other love. Our country singing, cat-owning, cigar smoking part-time detective (with a new espresso machine) once again falls into a string of murders. This time, however, the killer is using the music of Hank Williams to drop his clues.
I'll admit that Kinky's mysteries are a little too pat sometimes. The killers always leave "real" clues (not the kind you have to find, the kind you get in the mail or on the doorstep). But, the detective work is sound and that's still not the best thing about this book...the greatest gift we get here is the feel of the music business and the club life (and the people who inhabit that world). I always think of Lawrence Block's Matt Scudder with a guitar when I read the tales of detective Kinky, and that's a compliment indeed.
It's an easy read, it's a true page-turner, and it's funny as hell. What more you want?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Musician, Author, Sleuth....Governor ? 17 Mar. 2006
By Craobh Rua - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
"A Case of Lone Star" is Kinky's second book, and was first published in 1987. As with his other books, Kinky has cast himself as the amateur-PI hero, while some of the other characters have been based on actual friends. As with real-life, the book's Kinky is a cigar-smoking, cat-loving, espresso-guzzling, whiskey-drinking, ex-country and western performer. He shares his loft on Vandam Street with his cat - who he occasionally leaves in charge. Conversations between Kinky and the cat tend to be somewhat one-sided, while the cat consistently refuses to answer the telephone.

Much of the action takes place in the Lone Star Café - a famous New York establishment that's played host to musical legends such as the Blues Brothers, the Rolling Stones and Kinky Friedman. The book opens with Kinky being contacted by Cleve, the manager of the Lone Star. Cleve has a slight problem with Larry Barkin, the frontman of Larry Barkin and the Barkin Brothers. Unfortunately, Larry isn't in any fit state to go on for the second set, having been murdered in his dressing room after the first set. A note that had arrived through the post the previous day - previously discounted as just fan mail - is now being viewed in a different light. It contained the lyrics of an old Hank Williams number that tied up with the scene of the crime. Bill Dick, the club's owner, asks Kinky to help with the club's woes.

Five people had been in Larry's dressing room after the first set. Three of them are known to Kinky : Chet Flippo (an old Texan friend of the Kinkster, who'd recently written a book about Hank Williams), Mike Simmons (an excellent country singer, who is not only partial to the sauce but also to Hank Williams' music) and Ratso (the Watson to Kinky's Sherlock). However, he knows nothing about the other two : a beautiful British photographer - or a lovely limey shutterbug, as Kinky puts it - and a bald cocaine-dispensing lawyer.

"A Case of Lone Star" has much in common with the other books by Kinky I've read. While it's not an entirely serious `whodunnit' it is a fast moving, enjoyable and very easily read book. It's also packed with superbly delivered one-liners - though the humour may not quite appeal to everyone.
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Great Book! 10 Nov. 2000
By ariel goldberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
As far as kinky freidman goes, this is not a very good effort. That does not mean it is not a good novel, however. It is tremendously funny, and just a tad sexy. If you are first getting started on kinky, then maybe you should start with another one. This book is only for serious freidman fans only.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
A Case of Lone Star 9 Feb. 2010
By Richard Simpson - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
I bought this book for my twin brother. He was so happy that I found it and that he can add it to his collection of rare well written mystery novels!
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
a poorly written detective story with a musical twist 30 May 2013
By lazza - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
'A Case of Lone Star' is really a pretty weak novel. The author plants himself as the private detective living in Greenwich Village trying to resolve murders and a C&W music venue/bar. The murders are all linked to the music of Hank Williams. Kind of clever and cute? Yes. But this book is so poorly written. In every other sentence the author injects some sort of quip/double entre/anecdote that sometimes makes you smile, more often makes you grimace, and it all gets tiresome by page ten. Kinky Friedman is seemingly not half as clever as he tries to be.

I bought this as part of a collection of three Kinky Friedman novels. After reading 'A Case of Lone Star' I am donating this book to charity, although I do feel sorry for whomever buys it again.

Bottom line: proof that at least one Jew from Texas can't write mystery novels.
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