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The Daughter of Time Hardcover – 14 May 2011


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 158 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford City Press (14 May 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1849024472
  • ISBN-13: 978-1849024471
  • Product Dimensions: 15.2 x 1.3 x 22.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (324 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 369,537 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Review

"Most people will find The Daughter Of Time as interesting and enjoyable a book as they will meet in a month of Sundays" (Observer)

"A detective story with a very considerable difference. Ingenious, stimulating and very enjoyable" (Sunday Times)

"Josephine Tey has always been absolutely reliable in producing original and mysterious plots with interesting characters and unguessable endings" (Spectator) --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Book Description

Josephine Tey's classic novel about Richard III, the hunchback king, whose remains were recently discovered. The Daughter of Time investigates his role in the the death of his nephews, the princes in the Tower and his own death on the battlefield. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Grant lay on his high white cot and stared at the ceiling. Read the first page
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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

52 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Aliena on 19 Mar 2007
Format: Paperback
Inspector Grant of the Scotland Yard is stuck in a hospital bed, recovering from a broken leg. Since he's interested in faces, his friend Marta brings him a stack of pictures, to cure him from the prickles of boredom he's suffering from. Grant becomes fascinated with a portrait of Richard III, one of the most notorious villains in history, most known for killing his nephews, the princes in the Tower. But can this man, who mostly resembles a judge, really be a heartless murderer. Quickly frustrated with the lack of contemporary source material, Grant and a young American scholar tries to solve this historical mystery.

All I knew about Richard III and the princes in the tower I got from Shakespeare's play, which is far from flattering for the king. The portrait painted of him in this book is very different. It's incredibly fascinating, but I'm not quite sure how seriously to take it. But the mix of mystery and history is fun, and it's a joy to read. Perhaps the most interesting part is the general discussion of how history is written by the victors.
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46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 20 Sep 1998
Format: Paperback
This remarkable book deserves credit for not only being an intriguing story, but also a novel that is able to make the intricacies of history and medieval politics accessible to the reader. Instead of focusing on long and boring lists of sources, Tey goes into the whys of the mystery as well as the whats. Tey clearly challenges the long (and unfairly) established perception of Richard the III by asking one question: Why? Why would Richard have committed the crime? Why is he painted as villainous and grasping when all the evidence shows otherwise? Why did Tudor, who villified Richard mercilessly, never actually accuse Richard of the murder? Tey argues these points and backs them up superbly with evidence rather than hearsay from Tudor historians. She fully explores the motivations of the historians as well as Richard's supposed motives. Tey asks the questions which historians always ignore, such as Why the supposedly ruthless Richard would act with such restraint against proven enemies? These questions are every bit as valid as the traditional arguments, perhaps even more so, because they go into the very heart and nature of the deeds and the people involved
Incidentally, the title comes from the saying: "Truth is the daughter of time."
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By GlynLuke TOP 500 REVIEWER on 7 Aug 2013
Format: Paperback
Certainly a polemical novel. What a curate`s egg this is. I`d long heard of Tey`s two most famous books, this and The Franchise Affair, and have at last read one of them. I am very glad I have, chiming as it does with my burgeoning interest in all things medieval.
Detective Grant is in a hospital bed after an accident, doesn`t fancy the books at his bedside, so - after an actress friend Marta brings him a motley set of photos of notorious people for him to study - he fixates on the only known portrait of Richard III, reads up on his history, and promptly sets out to prove Richard`s innocence of the murder of the princes in the Tower. Or rather, Ms Tey does her utmost to prove it to the reader.
It all depends on how much the reader knows of the period, how much one cares, and how much prejudiced polemic a reader can take in a novel.
I thoroughly enjoyed the early chapters of this 200-odd-page novel, and Tey could certainly write, with a witty, deft turn of phrase. But keeping all the many and various characters of the fifteenth century tale in one`s mind and memory proves a tough task, and ultimately the book simply becomes weighed down by too many names, not to mention the slight repetitiveness of so much explication of historical persons, events and niceties.
By the end, I knew the conclusion Grant would come to (if not its exact details) and found the last chapter or two a touch anti-climactic.
Tey`s character descriptions in this otherwise very readable novel are well drawn, from the women who look after Grant in hospital to the young American he gets to scour the British Museum for evidence, one Brent Carradine.
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84 of 89 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 24 May 2002
Format: Paperback
Can one really judge from the face of a person whether this is a "judge" or a "criminal" - and can one really go back over well-trodden historical ground and redeem Richard III. This book can and does it so convincingly that you will never be able to look at the Tudors the same way again. The novel is perfectly structured and must rank among the top-ten detective stories - and the Shakespeare quotation of the title makes one go back to "Richard III" and, lo and behold, Shakespeare suddenly seems to be loyal lackey of a power machine based on lies. "The Daughter of Time" is one of the best reads ever.
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 17 Nov 2003
Format: Paperback
If like me most of your knowledge of Richard III comes from Shakespeares character assasination of him then read this book. Ms Tey manages to wrap up a very convincing historical analysis in an excellent story. Read it as an A level student and Loved it. Went on a 1 woman mission to convince everyione I knew that Richard III was innocent but no one puts it quite so concisely and eloquently as Josephine Tey
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