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The Dating Game: One Man's Search for the Age of the Earth Paperback – 28 Mar 2002

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Product details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; First Paperback Edition, First Printing edition (28 Mar. 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521893127
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521893121
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 1.6 x 21.6 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,403,198 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Product Description

Amazon Review

Textbooks tell us that the Earth is 4.6 billion years old and that the dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago. Just as our understanding of human history is helped by dates, so the history of the Earth and life of the geological past has also been dated by scientists. Most people have heard of radiocarbon dating, which can be used to date archaeological materials up to 50,000 or so years old but how is it possible to put a date to a rock? It was only a couple of hundred years ago that many scientists still believed that the Earth was 6,000 or so years old, a figure calculated by Archbishop Ussher in 1650 from biblical chronology.

In The Dating Game: One Man's Search for the Age of the Earth, Cherry Lewis tells the fascinating story of how the rocks of the Earth came to be dated and of the role played by the English geologist Arthur Holmes in the intellectual and practical struggle to do so. You do not need to know any science to appreciate the remarkable and protracted effort made by Holmes and his colleagues to discover how to measure time in rocks. They were using the same principles as those of radiocarbon dating, namely the radioactive decay of certain elements which naturally occur in rocks. At one time, Holmes became a shopkeeper to earn enough money to be able to return to his research. And then money for research in Britain was in such short supply that Holmes had to make a special plea to the university authorities for 74 pounds and 8 shillings for an electronic calculator to help speed up his work.

As a trained geologist, Cherry Lewis knows her subject. Although it is her first book, she tells the story well, making the technical details digestible by weaving them around Arthur Holmes' life story, so that they are accessible for the general reader. Diagrams, photographs and a bibliography help make The Dating Game useful as well as enjoyable. --Douglas Palmer --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

'… a gripping tale to tell … I would recommend it … to anyone who has the slightest interest in how our planet came to be the way it is.' John Gribbin, The Sunday Times

'… an engaging book … a good read for geologists ancient and modern who want to understand better the transformation of their discipline. It paints a picture of the life and surprisingly varied career … of a great scientist, strangely unsung both within his science and elsewhere.' Sue Bowler, Geoscientist

'This is a delightful book which manages very skilfully to combine an account of the history of measurements of the age of the earth with a biography of one of the pioneers in this field - Arthur Holmes. It is a fascinating story of one of modern science's great achievements and I have never read a clearer account of radio-active decay and how it has been used to date rocks.' Aubrey Manning, Presenter of the BBC series 'Earth Story'

'… a welcome portrait of a gifted British scientist whose abilities were often stymied by lack of funds and resources.' Douglas Palmer, Nature

'… a delightful and informative biography … we owe Lewis tremendous thanks.' Henry Frankel, EOS

'… a fascinating story … Cherry Lewis' description of the twists and turns by which the oldest known rocks in the world came to have their now accepted great age made for a fascinating read, as did the winding tale of one man's part in this.' Robert S. White, Geological Magazine

'… makes lively reading and is recommended as an absorbing historical biography.' Paul R. Renne, Physics Today

'… this reads almost like a Who's Who of geology and the budding science of nuclear physics … a worthwhile read for anyone interested in fuller pictures of the people behind scientific advance.' Anne Burgess, OUGS Journal

'Cherry Lewis' description of the twists and turns by which the oldest known rocks in the world came to have their now accepted great age made for a fascinating read, as did the winding tale of one man's part in this.' Robert S. White, Science and Christian Belief

'In this excellent book, Cherry Lewis has given a concise account of the development of geochronology and an insight into the life of a remarkable man. … There are few scientists, especially geologists, who are able to fire the public imagination with stories drawn from their own specification. Cherry Lewis is one of the few.' Rodney Walshaw

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Green on 17 April 2010
Format: Paperback
In a nutshell, I really enjoyed reading this book. It simply flowed, as well as providing a good insight into what otherwise could have been a dull specialist subject.
The book is a biographical story about a man with a passion for geology, but more particularly his pursuit for the age of the earth.

You really do 'experience' the 'highs' and 'lows' of this extraordinary life as Cherry Lewis manages to weave this story together from the meagre information available to her from diaries and letters written by Arthur Holmes over his lifetime.

It's a "story of one man's vision of developing a geological timescale, which lasted fifty years despite scientific opposition, financial hardship and personal tragedy".....

Although I personally differ in my views about the age of the earth (and not a geologist), this does not detract from the engaging nature of this well written book.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 22 Nov. 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is a great read and not only for geologists! Cherry Lewis is surely the Dava Sobel (of "Longitude" fame)of the geological world! She writes in a flowing style that that avoids the technicalities of its scientific subject.
Many people will know Arthur Holmes for his "Principles of physical geology", the book which helped to arouse my interest in the subject when I was at school. But the book tells much more about his geological work in Africa and his lifelong research to determine the true age of the Earth.
A fascinating read!
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By G.I.Forbes on 3 Aug. 2014
Format: Hardcover
This book records the life and times of Arthur Holmes who for several decades of his life strove to determine the age of Earth.
Previous estimates had ranged from 60,000 years to 3 million years.Holmes would not accept these estimates and was rideculed and ignored by his coworkers but in the end he was vindicated whan radioactivity dating gave the age of Earth at 4.5 billion years.
Along the way Holmes managed to transfer geology from an art to a science and become one of the U.K.s foremost scientists.
A very well written and at times amusing story.
A first class book.
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Format: Hardcover
A fascinating biography of a fascinating brilliant geologist. In the absence of an autobiography this is the next best thing.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By "callumh" on 4 Mar. 2004
Format: Hardcover
Arthur Holmes is a colossus of Earth Science, and geochronology in particular. His faith in his own ability and results brought forward the development of U-Pb dating and acceptance of one Geology's most powerful techniques. His determination to succeed ensured that Earth Science Departments with which he was associated, most notably Durham, became world class.
His story is an important one, and deserved to be told. However, the finished article leaves me wanting. The story of Arthur Holmes without science is not much, and I wonder if the author may have been better served by exploring the hard-facts of his science further. With its inclusion, the lay reader would more fully appreciate the magnitude of Holmes' contribution.
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