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The Daring Heart of David Livingstone: Exile, African Slavery, and the Publicity Stunt That Saved Millions Hardcover – 23 Sep 2014


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Product details

  • Hardcover: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Thomas Nelson Publishers (23 Sept. 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1595555927
  • ISBN-13: 978-1595555922
  • Product Dimensions: 16.2 x 2.5 x 23.5 cm
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 3,331,852 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Product Description

About the Author

Jay Milbrandt is a professor at Bethel University in St. Paul, Minnesota. He is a Senior Fellow in Global Justice with the Nootbaar Institute at Pepperdine University School of Law where he formerly directed the Global Justice Program. He travels throughout the world as a human rights lawyer, manages global initiatives in Africa and Southeast Asia, and consults with organizations engaged in human rights and legal development efforts. JayMilbrandt.com

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Amazon.com: 33 reviews
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Rather than exaggerate each accomplishment of Livingstone's or laboriously take you through his relationships/journal entries th 23 Sept. 2014
By Mitchell Emmert - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
I was able to read an advance copy of this book last week. If you have any interest in the complicated persona of David Livingstone, you'll find it fascinating.

I find Livingstone interesting as a personality and famous figure, as he was a 19th century explorer who sought and failed to find the source of the Nile, missionary w/barely any converts, and quasi-diplomat who failed to maintain healthy relations with his home country. However, I don't have the time or diligence to work through an anthology of his compiled letters or minute details of explorations. Here, Milbrandt has hit the high points in a convenient format and penned a very enjoyable read. Rather than exaggerate each accomplishment of Livingstone's or laboriously take you through his relationships/journal entries this book provides an easy to read account of his many ups and downs and determination (and constant setbacks) to curb the East African Slave Trade.

The content of the book is especially salient today, as fostering human rights and working through the complex remains of colonialism remains as big of a challenge as ever. I highly recommend checking it out.
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Highly recommend! 24 Sept. 2014
By Rachel - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
Truly and thoroughly enjoyed this book! I don't usually read history or even much non-fiction, but this was a treat! It's about something incredibly important and noble--abolition of the East African slave trade--, but told as an unfolding, exciting adventure undertaken by flawed yet resilient people.
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Don't Presume You Know Livingstone 7 Nov. 2014
By Doug Hibbard - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
If you are like me, the first thing that comes to mind when the name “David Livingstone” is mentioned is “I presume?” coming from Stanley’s lips. Then I think that the two of them roamed Africa in pith helmets and went on about life.

If Jay Milbrandt is right, then I have a weak picture of Livingstone. Weak, or perhaps incomplete, because I have missed Livingstone’s involvement in the most important moral reform of the nineteenth century: the major abolition of slavery. In his day, the East African slave trade was still strong.

The odd solution, given the situation of the time, was for Livingstone to extend the influence and control of the British Empire. The Empire had banned slavery under the efforts of Wilberforce decades before, though it was hard to enforce at the distances to Zanzibar. Livingstone tried to combat it, but often found himself reliant on slave traders for his life.

Milbrandt’s work takes the reader into the heart of Livingstone’s personal conflict in the midst the geopolitical one. His portrait of a crusader for justice who cannot quite work with others, but cannot survive without them pulls Livingstone out of the painting and into reality. We see that he is no boneless explorer, but one who had both hard edges and soft ones.

I like the style of this biography. Livingstone is not portrayed as perfect, but Milbrandt does not obsess with showing us his “faults” either. This is a portrait of Livingstone that one can learn from but one is not tempted to bow down to.

Alongside the man, we also get a good look at the time, seeing that East Africa and British Empire were neither perfect nor perfectly horrid, but filled with people and the mixed bag that this brings. A greatly heroic deed is followed by a horrific attitude. This is the world, not much different from the one we live in.

This is a good read, and a useful one for Christians struggling with our legacy in the world. I’d suggest this one for high school and up, well worth the time and shelf space.

Free book in exchange for the review.Review first appeared on my personal website
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Dr Livingstone, the abolitionist, I presume 30 Sept. 2014
By Jeremy D. Riley - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition
I must confess, the only things I knew about David Livingstone prior to this past month was his quest for the source of the Nile River and the famous line, “Dr Livingstone, I presume.” I thought Livingstone was a mere explorer and had no idea that his deep faith shaped him in tremendous ways.

Jay Milbrandt’s “The Daring Heart of David Livingstone” painted a wonderful picture of this complex man who embodied the science, exploration, and missionary work so well. Livingstone was a driven, complex man who was painfully aware of his own deficiencies. Often times he would not yield to counsel, but instead would press on out of his driven (or perhaps, stubborn) nature. After initial triumphs, he experienced setback after setback, ultimately dying in the land he loved. His drive to expose and abolish the East African slave trade ultimately cost him his life and his family.

One of the major themes that struck me was how Livingstone did not live to see the fruit of his life’s ambition. He instead died nearly penniless and separated from his family. He never saw the abolition of the slave trade in East Africa, never discovered the source of the Nile, and had only one convert to his missionary goals. Like Moses, he never entered into the promised land.

Milbrandt’s work was well done and thoroughly researched. The book was riveting and full of lively descriptions of the expeditions. Upon closing the biography, I felt like I knew Livingstone better and understood in part the East African slave trade. I also appreciated how Milbrandt brought out the imperialistic vision of Livingstone and let him argue for this movement, allowing history to be its judge. Milbrandt is an excellent biographer.

If you are into biographies and want to learn about a relatively under-the-radar historical figure, I recommend Jay Milbrandt’s “The Daring Heart of David Livingstone: Exile, African Slavery, and the Publicity Stunt That Saved Millions.”

——
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers <http://booklookbloggers.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Home Run Biography! 26 Sept. 2014
By Jimmy R. Reagan - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Hardcover
What do you really know about David Livingstone? Would you love a volume that in giving wonderful biographical narrative emphasized one of Livingstone’s greatest, yet seldom-discussed accomplishments? How about if the volume was gripping to the point it you did not want to put down? You should, then, check out the new release The Daring Heart of David Livingstone by Jay Milbrandt and published by Thomas Nelson.

The subtitle “Exile, African Slavery, and the Publicity Stunt That Saved Millions” clues you in his angle. I must confess that at first I was a little skeptical about that angle. Livingstone was a missionary, not a political crusader, right?

Fortunately, the book was not obsessed with its angle, but only developed it naturally as it went along. What you had instead was the famous story marvelously condensed and thrilling as ever. All the big events were there woven seamlessly into the story of the man and the author’s conclusions. Mr. Milbrandt can tell a story well.

The author showed Mr. Livingstone warts and all, yet you never lost your great respect for him. He had his struggles and he felt a failure on several occasions. Results were unpleasant actually at times too. Yet, Livingstone never failed to keep pressing on.

What the author demonstrated well was that Livingstone, though he died without knowing it, was one of the main reasons the slave trade in Africa stopped. He proved too that became ever more a goal for Livingstone. He was horrified at the tragic events he witnessed in the abuse, enslavement, and,even, slaughter of Africans.

The irony of so much of Livingstone’s goals being accomplished without him knowing it, and his lonely, humble life in Africa as he became a worldwide celebrity, is a most compelling story. In my view, it is a story of God at work in our world as well.

My only complaint is the missionary work of Livingstone was rarely discussed and portrayed as a minor thing. For the man who died praying by his bed in Africa, the evidence easily proves he was a servant of the Lord.

This book is a home run, and short enough for those readers who shy away from biographies that are a little too thick. You will enjoy this book!

I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.
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