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The "Daily Telegraph" Military Obituaries: Bk. 2 Hardcover – 30 Sep 2006


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Hardcover, 30 Sep 2006
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Product details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Grub Street (30 Sept. 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904943608
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904943600
  • Product Dimensions: 19.9 x 14.1 x 3.7 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 521,461 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Product Description

Review

"Splendidly readable...Some of the tales here are so extraordinary they
beggar belief" -- The Spectator, November 2006

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ned Middleton HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on 24 Sept. 2007
Format: Hardcover
If there is but one single disadvantage to getting older, it is that we begin to recognise, from within our own circle of people and experiences, more and more of those whose names appear under the heading "Obituaries." This second book of Military Obituaries, from David Twiston Davies, contains one of my former commanding officers and a former colleague who was 10 years my junior. Not that I'm getting old - certainly not, but it does add a personal connection.

In an excellent compilation, we are treated to an abbreviated celebration of the lives of another 100 former soldiers who were not all generals or holders of the VC. Signalman Laurence Cotterell, for example, went on to become a notable poet and Rifleman Alex Bowlby wrote an outstanding book which was hailed as "one of the best accounts of a front-line infantryman in the Second World War." Elsewhere, there are, as there should be, accounts of the lives and the deeds of the good and the great including the redoubtable General Sir Anthony Farrar-Hockley and my old CO Johnny Watts...

What I like most about the book is the eclectic mix with every single army rank being represented. From 100 obituaries, six were holders of the VC, twenty held the rank of Brigadier to Field Marshal and a further 15 were non-commissioned. If I could improve the book, however, it would be to add the relevant page number against the list of names of those who are included.

The saddest part was in learning of the death of Vanessa Lloyd-Davies two years ago. We were colleagues in the former Yugoslavia in 1992 and there are many unanswered questions from that particular tour of duty and the way in which it was commanded!
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 14 Oct. 2003
Format: Hardcover
I have already purchased Grub Street's Daily Telegraph Book of Airmen's Obituaries which was a classic read and great to dip in-and-out of. I was extremely happy to see that Grub Street has now released a book of Military Obituaries.
This book is an absolute pleasure to read - and contains some great anecdotes and humour and is not as morbid as some might consider. Presentation must be noted - it is a great size and the presentation is very nice indeed - I especially like the front cover image, which, I believe, is a Bruce Bairnsfather. I'd definitely recommend this title to anyone who has an interest in military history. Great job!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Noel on 2 April 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I already have 3 volumes of Daily Telegraph obituaries and when a friend asked me about the obituary of a Major General he had known I was disappointed to see that he did not feature in any of my 3 volumes. I saw this book on Amazon at a bargain price and bought it next day. I was dismayed to discover the Major General does not feature in this volume either even though his obituary had been published in the newspaper. My disappointment did not last long as I was quickly captivated by the first one I read.

The only shortcoming of this series of books is that they could not possibly cover all of those whose deaths are marked in the newspaper. However there is not one obituary in any of these books is a disappointing or below par. An excellent series of well written and thoughtful reports on lives which have left a mark. The living have much to learn from the lives of those who have gone before.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ian Millard on 1 Jun. 2010
Format: Hardcover
As another reviewer said, an obituary is about life, not death. I enjoyed this book, though less than some of its predecessors. The really eccentric are few and far between in the military world, perhaps. Having said that, the lives here chronicled are all full of events, sometimes tragic, sometimes amazing and sometimes very lucky, too. I was particularly struck by the last life here, that of Major Roy Farran, who received, in WW2, three MC's, the DSO, the Croix de Guerre and the (US) Legion of Merit. After WW2, he was head of an undercover unit of the Palestine police, operating against the Jewish terrorists. He shot one, it was alleged (he denied it), was charged with murder for political reasons (to placate the Jews), released but suffered a personal loss as his youngest brother was killed back home in Scotland by a letter-bomb, the assassination method pioneered by the Jewish terrorists and later much used by Mossad.

A good read.
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