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The Culture Code: An Ingenious Way to Understand Why People Around the World Live and Buy as They Do (Your Coach in a Box) Audio CD – Audiobook, 15 Jan 2008


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Product details

  • Audio CD: 6 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown and Company; Unabridged edition (15 Jan 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596591269
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596591264
  • Product Dimensions: 13.3 x 3.2 x 15.2 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 2,416,720 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By EuropeanDiversity on 21 Nov 2008
Format: Paperback
Understanding other people - their behaviours, their decisions, their communication - can be regarded as one of the most critical elements on the way to unleash the power of Diversity. Over time, experts have developed a variety of models trying to explain some of the differences we observe or experience when dealing with others. Gender differences (born or bred) were examined and today account for some of the behavioural patterns. Cultural models (with different meanings of `culture') try to describe characteristics or traits of groups of people, and how they compare with other groups on certain dimensions. Typically, these were chosen by someone (mostly Western males) and then applied to cultural contexts where they may or may not be relevant. In his book, The Culture Code, Clotaire Rapaille presents a quite different approach to understanding cultures and how they play out in everyday life. Concretely, he shows how to immerse in a foreign culture in order to explore what makes people tick - and how. His discoveries have been eye-opening - for marketers at first, for cultural experts later, and for many of us still today. Based on his research of thirty years, he describes the underlying meanings, interpretations, values and/or unconscious connotations that we apply to different things in life. In practical terms, he says that food, love or work carry different meanings for people in different cultures (or other contexts). However, few people have been aware of the vast implications the different `codes' (as he calls the connotations) have. Actually, they explain many cross-cultural processes more accurately and more effectively than any of the Hofstedes or Halls ever could.Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By James Lawn on 27 Aug 2006
Format: Hardcover
CONCEPT

The principles of human behaviour and thought are fascinating and useful in their own right. However, the fact that this knowledge can be applied with such clarity to business challenges such advertising, marketing and sales - to the enhanced benefit of the consumer and business - is truly exciting. Dr. Clotaire Rapaille brings this principle to life in "The Culture Code". He explains that the Culture Code is the unconscious meaning we apply to any given thing and he goes on to describe how giving due consideration to this unconscious meaning can have profound positive effect for all concerned. Considering and understanding the `Culture Code' for any given situation or set of circumstances can be truly revealing.

BACKGROUND

3 Unconsciousness's

There are in principle 3 human unconsciousness's at work: Freudian individual unconscious that guides us as individuals; Jungian collective unconscious that guides us as the human race; and, a core concept to this book, Cultural unconscious that guides us as a nation.

3 Levels of the brain

The human brain can be expected to respond to situations on any of 3 levels: the Cortex which handles learning, abstract thought and imagination; the Limbic System which handles emotion; and the Reptilian brain which deals with survival and reproduction.

3 Human Structures

By looking at how people act in certain ways, Dr. Rapaille shows how to look past the content of what people say and into the structure, principally in 3 categories: our biological structure, dictated by our DNA; our individual structure which defines our identity; and our culture (language, art, habitat, history etc) which defines us as a group.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By D&D TOP 50 REVIEWER on 14 Mar 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Although the writer mainly does his (extremely highly paid) work for marketing and advertising purposes, the book gives an unusually deep insight into the underlying meanings of certain concepts for various cultures.

Based on the learning of the particular culture as constructed in early childhood, he defines (for instance) what the word "love" means to several different cultures - and backs up his claims. He says that to the Americans (an adolescent culture) "love" really means "false expectation"; that in France "love" and pleasure are intertwined; the Italians expect love to contain strong dimensions of pleasure, beauty and (above all) fun (and that for them true love is maternal love); and for the Japanese (an older culture) love is a "temporary disease".

Most of what he says resonates as true (I have lived for more than a decade each in Western Europe, America and Japan). [...]. I'd love to read more on this subject by this author.
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By Rolf Dobelli TOP 500 REVIEWER on 20 July 2009
Format: Hardcover
The core idea of this pleasant, accessible book is easy to grasp: Culturally specific codes shape people's understandings, behaviors and emotional responses. French-born psychoanalyst and marketing maven Clotaire Rapaille brings a useful perspective shaped by his experiences as a U.S. immigrant to his discussion of what he calls "Culture Codes." His methods for tapping into these codes are straightforward. However, some of his conclusions lead to fairly sweeping, general claims about overall national cultures. His explanations of coded cultural instincts and actions are still interesting, particularly when he delves specifically into American, French, English, German, Japanese and other societies. getAbstract suggests his book to those interested in cultural differences and those responsible for tailoring marketing concepts to reach specific national audiences around the world.
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