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The Croods Soundtrack


Price: £7.15 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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Frequently Bought Together

The Croods + Epic (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) + Iron Man 3 [Official Score]
Price For All Three: £36.83

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Product details

  • Audio CD (18 Mar. 2013)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Soundtrack
  • Label: Sony Music Classical
  • ASIN: B00BCU6E48
  • Other Editions: MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 24,400 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song TitleArtist Time Price
Listen  1. Shine Your WayOwl City;Yuna 3:26£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  2. PrologueAlan Silvestri 2:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  3. Smash and GrabAlan Silvestri 4:09£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  4. Bear Owl EscapeAlan Silvestri 2:45£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  5. Eep and the WarthogAlan Silvestri 3:53£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  6. Teaching Fire to Tiger GirlAlan Silvestri 1:55£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  7. Exploring New DangersAlan Silvestri 3:33£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  8. PiranhakeetsAlan Silvestri 2:24£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen  9. Fire and CornAlan Silvestri 2:06£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen10. Turkey Fish FolliesAlan Silvestri 4:17£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen11. Going Guys WayAlan Silvestri 3:15£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen12. Story TimeAlan Silvestri 3:55£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen13. Family MazeAlan Silvestri 3:21£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen14. Star CanopyAlan Silvestri 2:08£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen15. Grug Flips His LidAlan Silvestri 1:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen16. Planet CollapseAlan Silvestri 1:44£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen17. We'll Die If We Stay HereAlan Silvestri 5:28£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen18. Cave PaintingAlan Silvestri 1:12£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen19. Big IdeaAlan Silvestri 2:34£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen20. EpilogueAlan Silvestri 4:25£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen21. Cave Painting ThemeAlan Silvestri 2:52£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen22. The Croods' Family ThemeAlan Silvestri 5:54£0.99  Buy MP3 
Listen23. Cantina CroodsAlan Silvestri 1:12£0.99  Buy MP3 

Product Description

This soundtrack includes a new Owl City electronica pop single ‘Shine your way’ feat.Malaysian singer-songwriter, Yuna and a score by multiple Grammy Award winner, Alan Silvestri.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Great service,well wrapped,super fast delivery, a good quality item,it's a great way of replacing your old vinyl albums, highly recommended
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By Tajkov Gábor on 30 Jan. 2015
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Super!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 8 reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
love it or get serious help 3 Feb. 2014
By "bring me back to the 60's -70's" Jim - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
It deserved 5 stars. An animated film that brings this 63 year old US Veteran to tears is doing something right. I loved the music, the artwork and the story. Great job to all
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
Not crude, but missing a little something 3 April 2013
By Jon Broxton - Published on Amazon.com
The Croods is the latest animated film from Dreamworks Pictures, about a family of dysfunctional Neanderthals trying to find a new place to live when the cave that has been their home for years is destroyed. The film is directed by Kirk De Micco and Chris Sanders - the latter of whom also directed Lilo & Stitch and How To Train Your Dragon - and has an all-star voice cast featuring Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine Keener and Cloris Leachman. Providing the music for the prehistoric adventure is composer Alan Silvestri, who worked with Sanders on Lilo & Stitch back in 2002, and who is writing his fifth animation score since the turn of the millennium, following The Polar Express, The Wild, Beowulf, A Christmas Carol and the aforementioned Lilo & Stitch.

A large-scale orchestral work filled with the usual soaring melodies and rambunctious rhythms, including a touch of Zimmer-esque Africana, The Croods is in many ways a quintessential Silvestri score, providing color and pathos to the wide range of emotions on display during the film. The album opens with the song "Shine Your Way", written by Silvestri and lyricist Glen Ballard along with co-directors De Micco and Sanders, and performed by the popular Minnesota rock band Owl City. The melody of the song actually crops up in a couple of later cues, most notably the montage-like "Going Guys Way" and the Lion King-influenced "Star Canopy", which at least gives the song and score some sense of cohesiveness. However, most score fans will overlook the song as little more than pseudo-pop nonsense, despite Silvestri's involvement.

The "Prologue" introduces twinkling chimes and an ooh-aah chorus before heading off into a vaguely ethnic reworking of the "Shine Your Way" melody. Later, the entertaining "Smash and Grab" features a re-worked version of Fleetwood Mac's popular 1979 song "Tusk" featuring the University Southern California Trojan Marching Band, and is a fun homage to American Football display music, all rhythm and pageantry.

The rest of the score is all Silvestri, running the gamut of styles from knockabout Mickey Mouse-style comedy, lush grandeur, and even some surprisingly vivid action material. The lyrical centerpiece of the score is the recurring "Croods Family Theme", which appears several cues during course of the score before receiving its standout concert performance during the penultimate cue. A gentle, flowing melody which works its way from around the orchestra through rich brasses, glowing strings, accompanied by fluttering woodwind accents, it's a lovely, if slightly anonymous theme, which is hampered slightly by some superficial similarities to John Williams' theme from Jurassic Park. Its in-score performances during the tender "Story Time", the lush "We'll Die If We Stay Here", and in the sweeping, ethnically enhanced "Epilogue" keep the music anchored in a recurring thematic identity.

A secondary theme, subtitled the Cave Painting Theme, gets its largest performance during "Cave Painting" and the conclusive set piece, "Big Idea", as well as the concert-arranged "Cave Painting Theme", but despite its prettiness and epic sweep of both these idea, the themes are unlikely to be remembered among Silvestri's most notable melodies.

There are some lovely instrumental textures hiding in pockets of the score: the fluttery interplay between different parts of the woodwind section during "Eep and the Warthog" are great, as is the interpolation of a contemporary electronic beat into the second half of "Family Maze". Similarly, some of the chord progressions and percussive rhythmic elements in cues like "Teaching Fire to Tiger Girl" are quintessentially Silvestri, reaching all the way back to Back to the Future and Predator.

The action and suspense music in cues like "Exploring New Dangers" and the gargantuan "Planet Collapse" is at times unexpectedly exciting and serious, filled with a sense of palpable menace, while the thrilling "Piranhakeets" and "Big Idea" amp up the excitement levels with extravagant string runs, thunderous percussion hits and heavy brass stingers. At the other end of the emotional scale, "Fire and Corn" is comedy gold, pitting a circus-like rhythm with all manner of percussive anarchy and even a brief nod to Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture, while "Turkey Fish Follies" at times recalls both the broad Western writing of Back to the Future III and the saxophone cool of Soapdish, and is clearly the work of a composer simply having fun. The lounge jazz of "Grug Flips His Lid" feels a little incongruous and out of place, but I'm sure it makes sense in context.

There's nothing inherently wrong with The Croods at all. It's well composed, intelligently designed, has recurring themes and motifs, and some moments of real power and beauty. There are some unusual stylistic choices dotted around here and there, but that's to be expected in a children's animated film, and doesn't diminish the score as a while. As such, I'm struggling to pinpoint what it is about The Croods that I'm failing to connect with. Part of the issue might be my slight niggling concern about its anonymousness and its lack of a really memorable central element to take away, although, having said that, the Family Theme is truly lovely and makes an excellent solo listening experience. Fans of Silvestri's richly textured orchestral writing will find a lot to enjoy, and a great deal of the score is wonderfully entertaining on its own terms, so perhaps I'm contradicting myself, but there's just something about it that doesn't entirely capture me.
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
A fine Alan Silvestri score that evokes scenes from the movie - and has some good segments for workouts as well 16 Feb. 2014
By Whitt Patrick Pond - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Audio CD
Like a lot of film scores, a lot depends on whether or not you liked the movie it's from. If you liked The Croods as a movie, then you'll definitely like the soundtrack Alan Silvestri composed for it. The music shifts in tones according to the scenes the pieces accompany, sometimes pensive, sometimes playful, sometimes dramatic and emotional, and sometimes all out run-for-your-life exhilarating.

My favorite pieces were "Smash and Grab", the music from the early 'hunting' scene where Silvestri works in bits of Fleetwood Mac's classic "Tusk" as the Croods compete with the local wildlife for an egg; "Piranhakeets" where Guy saves Eep and her family from the Pranhakeets swarm with his fire, the frenetic "Fire and Corn" where the Croods learn about fire the hard way, the sweetly lyrical "Going Guy's Way" where the theme from the opening song "Shine Your Way" is reworked instrumentally as Guy shows the Croods how to deal with their new environment after their cave was destroyed, "We'll Die If We Stay Here" and "Cave Painting" both touching emotional chords from what are arguably the two most moving scenes in the film, and "Big Idea" where the music swells as Grug races to carry out his one big idea before the approaching land collapse overtakes him. In addition, there are three pieces played during the end credits that repeat themes from pieces earlier in the film, but at a more leisurely pace.

The Croods isn't going to rank as one of the great film scores of all time as there is too much shifting in tone and mood to make it the sort of film score you'll want to play from beginning to end. And I do have to admit that the one actual song, "Shine Your Way", didn't really do much for me. It was okay, but not all that memorable in and of itself - I liked the instrumental reworking of it found in "Going Guy's Way" better for some reason. But all that said, The Croods does have pieces that will be people's personal favorites and that you'll want to pick out for playlists.

On a side note, I've found that a number of Silvestri's pieces are good for listening to during workouts at the gym, particularly if you're on the track or working on one of the ellipticals. Something to bear in mind when putting together a workout playlist for your ipod.

Highly recommended for anyone who liked the movie and for any fan of Alan Silvestri's work in general.
Nice music 9 Oct. 2013
By Eric M. - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
This is great music from Alan Silvestri. It holds up next to all the other movies he's scored. When I saw The Croods and noticed the music, I really wanted to have the soundtrack.

However, after listening to the orchestrations of the different parts of the movie on back-to-back tracks, I realized that most of it sounds the same. All but a few tracks, such as "Going Guys Way" and "Grug Flips His Lid" and "Shine Your Way," and "Smash and Grab" were in the same key and started out the same. It would be hard to tell the tracks apart if my mp3 player didn't list the titles. Was bummed that I bought the entire soundtrack when I could have bought just one of those tracks and it would have represented most of the other ones.

If I were to recommend buying any individual tracks they would be: "Going Guy's Way," "Grug Flips His Lid," "Shine Your Way," "Smash and Grab." Either the Prologue and/or the Epilogue would be a sufficient cross-section of the other instrumental music on the album.
Effective and enjoyable, but not terribly memorable on the whole 3 Jun. 2013
By Jon - Published on Amazon.com
Verified Purchase
You'll find a host of various elements that are likeable and familiar for Silvestri fans, ranging from typically raucous action outbursts to warm thematic statements. It all comes in bursts though, with some predictable lurches in activity that come from animated scores though, and with multiple listens I still can't separate much of the material from the overall generic feeling it creates. A likeable album, but not an essential one.
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