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The Cromwellian Protectorate (New Frontiers in History) Paperback – 1 Jan 2003


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The Cromwellian Protectorate (New Frontiers in History) + Cromwell's Major-Generals: Godly Government During the English Revolution (Politics, Culture & Society in Early Modern Britain)
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Product details

  • Paperback: 260 pages
  • Publisher: Manchester University Press (1 Jan. 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0719043174
  • ISBN-13: 978-0719043178
  • Product Dimensions: 14 x 2.3 x 21.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 717,016 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • See Complete Table of Contents

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Review

"Based on the impressive scholarship of an author who possesses a deep knowledge of his subject, this work will prove invaluable for all students following courses on mid-17th century Britain." --Chris Durston, St. Mary's College, Strawberry Hill

About the Author

Barry Coward is Reader in History at Birkbeck College, University of London

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Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Index | Back Cover
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jivespin on 30 Aug. 2005
Format: Paperback
The Cromwellian Proectorate is often a difficult topic for many A Level students. However, this book clearly examines this period in a structured, logical and, importantly, accessible style. Coward is a leading historian of this era and he has the gift of explaining this period in a way that students understand.

This book, I feel, is Coward's best as he actually makes this period come alive with fascinating comments and interesting asides. For students studying this period for A Level, I would have no hesitation in recommending this book as an essential read for your course.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vittorio on 30 May 2011
Format: Paperback
Excellent. Lots of facts, all annotated with sources. Really easy to read, not turgid or heavy and set out in a very logical way. Also very fair in the presentation of a subject which is always controversial.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By G. J. Weeks on 28 May 2006
Format: Paperback
It has been observed that the winners get to write the history. Only it seems after 350 years can we get a better assessment. This book is a step on that path dispelling as it does the popular view that Cromwell's protectorate was an oppressive military dictatorship . Coward shows that when Cromwell dispensed with parliaments it was because they had become either an ineffectual talking shop or they were not pursuing the godly reformation for which Cromwell and the army had fought. Cromwell was for a diverse but united English national church. Others wanted their liberty without granting it to those who differed. Some feared that diversity meant disorder..

It is interesting to note that many records of Cromwell and his council have not survived. Were they destroyed as part of the myth of dictator Oliver?

Godly reformation as Cromwell desired failed because different church factions were too busy fighting one another rather than accomplishing their real calling of evangelism. When hearts were not changed, reformation could not continue. It could not be imposed, top downwards particularly when it involved the reactionary Puritan abolition of the church calendar and other unpopular measures.

Cromwell's good record of improving foreign relations is examined and also the punitive treatment of the Irish in contrast with the kinder treatment of the Scots.

The Protectorate failed because no able successor to Cromwell could be found. England was not ready for a republic.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mervyn O. Hagger on 29 Nov. 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The title promises something that is only partly delivered. In fact the title is somewhat misleading, because by ascribing the period to the person of Oliver Cromwell, the fact that both England and Scotland were consumed within a new republican entity and ceased to exist as such, plays further into the hands of obfuscation by promoting the idea of an 'interregnum' to mask the fact that England and Scotland both became republics.
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