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The Creek Drank The Cradle
 
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The Creek Drank The Cradle

24 Sep 2002 | Format: MP3

£7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for £7.60 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 24 Sep 2002
  • Label: Sub Pop
  • Copyright: 2002 Sub Pop Records
  • Total Length: 39:26
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B003WAMVY8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 37,540 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Juan Mobili on 11 April 2004
Format: Audio CD
What a beautiful, beautiful album! It has been quite a while, with the exception of Damien Rice's and Teitur's debuts, than a first CD offered such creative consistency. Sam Beam, the man behind Iron and Wine, has achieved a work of such unassuming depth that is impossible not to grow impatient for a second recording. Song after song, he manages to convey moods that are at once tender and full of existential pain, without ever indulging on the way too common tendency in young songwriters to put music to their private diaries, nor indulging on the kind of over-instrumentation that not-so-young performers indulge in to make up for the lack of richness in their work. I don't think there's a single weak tune here, actually some of his lesser tunes could be the jewels in CDs by most of his contemporaries. To some he might remind you of Will Oldham, a likely mentor, yet his work has already a feel of its own. This Americana stripped from clichés, bringing together longing, sweetness and the lingering sense of someone reflecting on life without a 'an ax to grind' (this is the difference between poetry and a personal journal). I was tempted to name the great songs but after typing the name of the first four, and realizing that the fifth song will be next, I deleted them. Every song is worthwhile, and adds to the hue of emotions he's so able to articulate. In some ways, it is my opinion, he may remind you of Nick Drake, in his capacity to write of sadness so beautifully that it can almost embrace you, like joy.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Mr. M. J. Hulme on 10 Feb 2003
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Interestingly, Sub Pop seem to be reinventing themselves from label of all things grunge-rock to a new, mellow, "two guitars on the front porch " affair. But then, Sub Pop were always one step head of the game. This collection of songs by Sam Beam consists of stripped down, acoustic guitar affairs, with slide guitar and banjo making an appearance to add extra layers of mystery. It's a million miles away from the noisy excesses of grunge, and very special.
Beam sings laconically, as though he's half asleep, in a voice reminiscent of the more fragile moments from Mark Linkous of Sparklehorse. In fact, these songs would have slotted seamlessly onto the more lo-fi moments of 'Vivadixiesubmarinetransmissionplot,' Sparklehorse's excellent first album. No drums, just guitar and hushed vocals. Some strange magic is at work here - this is excellent, intimate stuff, transporting you to a mythical part of America in the same way as Gillian Welch's 'Time (The Revelator)' - timeless, haunting, and magical. Beam crafts songs that dig at the twisted heart of middle America; disturbing, but wonderfully well-drawn portraits of small-town life. This will be up there in the "2003 album of the year" stakes for sure.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By degrant on 17 Feb 2003
Format: Audio CD
Hot on the heels of Bonnie Prince Billy's "Master and Everyone" comes an album with titles like "the Rooster Moans" and "Muddy Hymnal", lovingly packaged with intimate etchings and lyrics such as "We found your name across the chapel door/carved in cursive with a table fork". Fans might be forgiven for thinking that, only seven weeks into the year, "The Creek and the Cradle" is the best Will Oldham tribute album of 2003.
Those fans would be wrong. One man band Sam Beam sings in a much more British manner and a number of the songs call to mind Belle and Sebastian rather than any of the current crop of alt country troubadours. While Beam's voice is as engaging as Stuart Murdoch's the sometimes fey delivery undermines the biblical imagery of "Just like the way that you ran to wine/when they made the new milk turn/Jesus, a friend in the better times" and makes "Southern Anthem" anything but anthemic.
However, several songs, embellished with banjo and what sounds on occasions like pedal steel guitar, are more American and, to my ears at least, all the stronger for it. Elsewhere the plucking guitar sound of "Faded from the Winter" is reminscent of "5 Leaves Left" era Nick Drake, topped off with gorgeous vocals.
While the album is much more instantaneous than the writing of Mark Linus, Will Odham, Kurt Wagner et al, the downside is that Beam has created a less individual and strong sound. That said, the overall strength of the set dispels any questions as to the viability of acoustic guitar music in 2003 and the album's immediacy might well lead Iron & Wine to greater commercial success than any of the other artists to whom they have been compared. All in all a delightful discovery.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Spider Monkey HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 29 Dec 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
'The Creek Drank The Cradle' is the sweet, melodic album written, performed, produced and recorded at home by Sam Beam. One reviewer here gave this CD a low star rating (which is entirely his prerogative) because of the poor recording quality, but I tend to feel that this element actually adds to the album. The raw, stripped back nature of the recording compliments the songs perfectly. The feel of one man and his guitar, sat in his living room, is completely captivating. The songs are spare and yet hold you spellbound throughout. A simple, beautiful album that is great to sit back to and let your cares slip away. Highly recommended. If you like this, check out 'The Pull' by Kreg Viesselman, another beautiful album of a similar ilk.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
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