The Crazy Years: Reflections of a Science Fiction Original and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Crazy Years: Reflections of a Science Fiction Original Paperback – 18 Nov 2004


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback, 18 Nov 2004
£25.12 £3.79


Product details

  • Paperback: 294 pages
  • Publisher: BenBella Books (18 Nov 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932100350
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932100358
  • Product Dimensions: 15.5 x 1.6 x 23 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,967,941 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

"If I didn't think it understated his achievement, I'd nominate Spider Robinson . . . as the new Robert Heinlein. . . . He writes as clearly about computers as he does about karate chops." --"The New York Times Book Review

About the Author

Spider Robinson has received three Hugo Awards, a Nebula Award, and the Pat Terry Memorial Award for Humorous Science Fiction. He is particularly known for his series Callahan's Place, believed to be the inspiration for one of the largest newsgroups on the Internet. He lives in Bowen Island, British Columbia. Lawrence Block's short stories have appeared in 'American Heritage', 'GQ', 'The New York Times', 'Playboy', and 'Redbook'. He is a Grand Master of the Mystery Writers of America and has won the Edgar, Japanese Maltese Falcon, Nero Wolfe, and Shamus awards. He lives in New York City.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Table of Contents | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Judith Davies-webb on 11 Feb 2010
Format: Paperback
Enter the world of the world's most talented punster,personal experience. Spider writes some truly great fiction but here you get to know a side of this genius that is personal. His ideas on the modern world and how he thinks we need to do more to try fix our part of it. Insightful and fun!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
A compilation of Robinson's news column, this book is by turns fascinating, witty and weird. Spider's writing is not always on the mark - but it's always punchy, informed, well expressed and well worth reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Helpful Customer Reviews on Amazon.com (beta)

Amazon.com: 11 reviews
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
Catch and Release 22 24 April 2006
By Robert Carlberg - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
It is a reflection of the "interesting times" in which we live that Spider's collection of common sense essays are viewed by some as controversial.

The subjects range from pro-cigarette diatribes (nicotine is addictive but harmless, while tars are harmful but not addictive), marijuana (good), politics (bad), religion, Hollywood, global warming, computers, pre-emptive wars, the natural moral superiority of Canadians... All stuff you'd expect from his novels, which touch on such everyday morality but never really come out and slap it on the counter.

Here, Spider brings the fish out from its display case.

It's a brave move, prairie-dogging in the shooting gallery*. Lesser men have lost ears, and you won't be hearing from THEM again. But Spider (despite his name) has some kind of aversion to webs of deceit ("What kind of spider understands arachnaphobia," sang Robert Wyatt) and insists on "telling it like it is" -- despite the fact that right this minute Valentine Michael Smith is probably testing the grandfather paradox with Winston Smith.

What was it Yossarian said? When everyone around you is crazy, acting sane is the best way to get put away (or something like that... ask Klinger).

* - I never metaphor I didn't like, sorry.
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
Spider at his best! 10 Jan 2007
By Nelson Vangundy - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
Thhis collection of Spider's Columnns [not previously seen in the US] is a wonderful collation of his wit, predictions, and social observations.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Spider 8 Oct 2012
By Gerald L. Burke - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Holds a mirror up to the reader so the reader may laugh @ the quirky things that we do do ourselves & to others. I recommend it as it was recommended to me. If you like to laugh, this Is a good book for you.
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
Great !!! 3 Aug 2012
By Jake - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Spyder is as irreverant as usual, bashes EVERYTHING !! I LOVE this guy! This is a collection of his shorter articles on his views of various political and social subjects. Well worth reading! AND funny (as usual)!! (Can you tell I'm a fan ???)
18 of 26 people found the following review helpful
The Crazy Years 25 Oct 2004
By AK - Published on Amazon.com
Format: Paperback
*** Spider Robinson has established a reputation as being one of the masters of science fiction, and here he proves Andrew Greeley's point that sci fi and fantasy writers are the philosophers of the modern world. His collected essays, ranging from the rigors of nicotine withdrawal, the variations of stupidity, and the differences between Canadians and Americans, particularly in politeness often amuse, when not hitting too close to home. His wit runs from dry to laugh out loud, yet the one true drawback of this book is that the more agnostic moments will most likely disturb or even offend those who do have faith. At these points, the best advice to readers is to pick out the bones, but keep the fish. ***

Reviewed by Amanda Killgore.
Were these reviews helpful? Let us know


Feedback