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The Crane Wife
 
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The Crane Wife

29 Jan 2007 | Format: MP3

7.49 (VAT included if applicable)
Buy the CD album for 14.52 and get the MP3 version for FREE. Does not apply to gift orders.
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Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
4:20
2
12:42
3
4:20
4
3:49
5
5:35
6
5:08
7
4:41
8
3:31
9
11:25
10
5:13


Product details

  • Original Release Date: 29 Jan 2007
  • Label: Rough Trade
  • Copyright: 2007 Rough Trade Records Ltd
  • Total Length: 1:00:44
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001MW5EGK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 20,244 in MP3 Albums (See Top 100 in MP3 Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By The Soft Machine Operator TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 8 Oct 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
An eclectic mix of pop, rock and folk that never get boring - at times it comes close to sounding like a long lost Jethro Tull album from the 1970s, somewhere between Thick as a Brick and Minstrel in the Gallery - which can only be a good thing. Song twist and turn through changes of sound and pace to great effect.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Boris Cerkuc on 20 Aug 2009
Format: Audio CD
The Crane Wife is magnificent album - with complex lyrics and pretty complex sound structure - very similar to mid 70's Jethro Tull. But it's also very fluent and catchy. For example - Summersong and Perfect Crime are wonderful pop tunes and much better songs than many from today's Top 10 singles charts. Triplet The Island, Come And See, The Landlords Daughter (You'll Not Feel The Drowning) is marvelous and it sounds just like forgotten Tull's song from their prog-rock phase. If you still have habit for listening long clever songs with complex structure Crane Wife is album for you. Single Oh, Valencia is nice song, Shankill Butchers one of my favourite songs in last 10 years, same as Yankee Bayonnet with nice vocals. Buy this album and you'll listen it for a long time, again and again...
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By MR87 on 2 Feb 2007
Format: Audio CD
"The Crane Wife" is, in many ways, a relief to Decemberist fans, in that it's clear that the band haven't dropped their style completely despite a move to a major record label in the US. However, it is clear that there have been some developments in the band's sound and approach, which carries both positive and negative consequences...

The first thing fans will notice about the new album is that the production is much sharper. What is more, the band have begun to broaden their musical outlook with tracks like "The Perfect Crime" and "When The War Came," which sound very different from Picaresque-era Decemberists. It is clear that the Decemberists have incorporated some of the sound they experimented with in their Tain EP into the new album. This isn't a bad move, in many ways, because it's always good to see a band move forward and develop. However, it does mean that the album loses some of that olde-worlde charm that we have come to expect from the band, though it still flairs up on the occasional track ("Shankill Butchers," "Yankee Bayonet"). This means less acoustic, folky, "Eli The Barrow Boy" type numbers, and more tracks with generic indie elements.

The standout tracks on the album are the three parts of "The Crane Wife," which are beautiful, melodic numbers based on a Japanese folk tale; the powerful "The Island" epic in which the band's 'rockier' sound is exhibited; the closing singalong "Sons and Daughters"; and the aforementioned, folky duet "Yankee Bayonet." Colin Meloy's imaginative, intricate lyrics are still present, as are his highly individual vocals. It is good to see the Decemberists have not dropped their emphasis on storytelling, which is one of their biggest appeals.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By G. Irwin on 5 July 2007
Format: Audio CD
I was given this album a couple of months ago by a friend who assured me that The Decemberists were one of the hippest band around at the moment. Having listening to this album and the ep 'The Tain' I became a bit confused. Being a fan of early Genesis, latter-day Marillion, and other such prog outfits I am used to being ridiculed and hit over the head for being terminally uncool. So how come the Decemberists managed to avoid the prog tag and its associations?. Some of the Crane Wife even sounds like Jethro Tull. Are the youth of today really listening to this and deaming it the height of cool?. Personally, its a great result for me as my friends are now looking on me in a entirely different light.

The album itself is, bar a couple of ropey tracks (Perfect crime), a masterpiece. The three Crane Wife tracks are amazing and I particular love the last song 'Sons and Daughters' (How many bands write songs that enable them to rhyme 'Aluminum' and 'cinnamon'?). In reference to my abovementioned comments, special praise is reserved for the prog-fest 'The Island'. It is a total joy and gets better with every listen. Its contains elements of almost every prog dinosaur that ever roamed the earth.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. A. Whitemore on 26 Oct 2007
Format: Audio CD
So often in the world things are a disappointment. This album is not. If you are looking for refreshingly good songwriting,lyricism,power and emotion cleverly put across, get it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Dalton on 29 July 2009
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
stepping towards the epic "hazards of love", here the decemberists venture into longer and more complex music making there's much play with styles, moving on seemingly effortlessly from picaresque to this altogether more complete and dramatic album. there's classical reference, soft and hard metaphor (qv "i drew my pistol, i drew my saber...") musical adventurousness, the usual mix of brandy and death, olde-worlde folk charm and now more brassy rock and rolla tunes as well. It almost feels not as if the decembersits are growing in themselves, but are growing us, the listeners, for something yet more shocking and titanic to come.

then there's golden moments too, summersong is particularly light in touch, poignancy in yankee bayonet, and sad and glorious tragic in the romeo & juliette-esque "o valencia." Then there is some levity in the modern day robbery-disco themed "perfect crime" it's all very mature, and very deft.

my only gripe is certain rhymes and themes (murder/rape/death in childhood) that threaten define the decemberists now seem to recurr a little too often. for example, i now wonder if Colin Meloy ever "walks" anywhere or always "rambles" where he goes. it may be that underpinning all this is that the band's imagination is wearing out, or perhaps this is just striving after perfection: it does seem to get closer each time. as it is, this weakness for affectation is forgivable in the midst of such musical triumph, and can even become endearing, in the end.
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