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The Count of Monte Cristo Audio Download – Unabridged

4.6 out of 5 stars 329 customer reviews

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Audio Download, Unabridged, 8 Aug 2011
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Dumas' "Count of Monte Cristo" is the most exciting book I have ever read. It is the epitome of the perfect adventure novel and contains all of the traits that define the genre: jealousy, suspense, action, revenge, deceit, etc. At 1100+ pages, and the label as a "classic," many readers would be turned off at the task of reading such a book. Although the story is long and over 150 years old, it is truly "timeless." This does not read at all like the books you were forced to endure in 9th grade English, and is mostly as topical today as it was when it was penned.

That being said, reading the "wrong" version of this book can change the reader's experience for the worse. Amazon has combined all of the reviews for this book across the many different versions available, which can be very misleading. There are two things that affect the story, the translation, and the context.

I strongly encourage everyone to get the UNabridged version of this story. The abridged version cuts out more than half of Dumas' novel and while the story is still enjoyable, the reader misses out on many exciting chapters in the book. Do not let the length fool you. I found every bit of this book exciting, and never got bored.

Secondly, look for the Robin Buss Translation. Many of the versions of this book use a translation from 1846 (including the Modern Library and Oxford World's Classics editions) that, because of social restrictions at the time, altered some of the story, especially that dealing with sexuality. The Robin Buss translation is more faithful and restores this language, as well as making it an easier read for modern readers.
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By A Customer on 5 Mar. 2006
Format: Paperback
This edition has a recent translation. I found the clasic translation quite heavy going to read. I switched early to this edition and instantly found it much more enjoyable. This newer traslation also seems more subtle and mature. The notes are helpful and explain many of the refrences and avoid pointing out obvious details. In addition, the introduction is very good.
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Format: Paperback
Dumas's dazzling, epic tale of a man seeking revenge following the ruination of his life is a thrilling read, despite being (in this edition) more than 1200 pages long. This edition is to be particularly recommended as it features a very fine recent translation, which reads very well and which also picks up on a few of the subtleties lost in the "classic" Victorian version of this novel.
Edmond Dantes is a man who, to use a cliche - has it all. He is young and just beginning to see success in his career, and has a beautiful fiance with whom he is madly in love. However, his world falls apart when he is thrown into prison on trumped-up treason charges and the world forgets about him - his father dies in poverty; his fiance, thinking he is lost to her forever, eventually marries another man. And Edmond himself spends years languishing in jail, coming close to insanity, before he meets another prisoner who gives him the skills and the courage to think about escaping and tracking down the men responsible for ruining his life...
"The Count of Monte Cristo" is an astounding novel in terms of its scope and its subject matter. We are led across Europe and through the lives of a wide cast of characters, seeing how their fates unfold over their lifetimes. The novel is also remarkable for dealing with some surprising subjects (if we consider the time it was written), including drug use and lesbianism, not to mention a murderer who is steadily working their way through an entire family.
The book does have a few problems - as other reviewers have mentioned, the Rome section drags.
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By A Customer on 24 Oct. 2003
Format: Paperback
No other word to describe this magic book. It made me take slower trains to work and back just so I could read more of it each day.
It has made me just order another book by the same author from Amazon.
BRAVO!!
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Format: Paperback
Dumas' unabridged novel The Count of Monte Cristo, weighs in at a hefty 900+ pages, a fact that might turn a great number of potential readers (and thus buyers) away. It is a mistake though, to pass up this novel on account of its pretensions to masonry, when what lies within is prose of a highly readable nature, and a story of timeless intrigue and vengeance. Not for nothing does Keith Wren's introduction refer to Dumas as the "John Grisham or Stephen King of his day".

I find that Wordsworth Classics are excellent editions overall, particularly for their jargon-free introductions, and the little piece of advice always noted at the front, that "we strongly advise you to enjoy this book before turning to the Introduction". In rival editions of classic novels I'm always looking for this advice, and find it wanting. It's satisfying to read the introduction on concluding the novel, to find Wren's exposition of the nature of both the writing and its context, and to more deeply engage in the circumstances of its production as a serialisation, written at high speed. My only criticism of this edition of the novel is that the speech becomes a little confused: with more than one speaker "talking" on a single line, it's really not clear at times which character the dialogue belongs to.

Of the story itself then, there seems little that needs to be related, as it forms a part of our popular consciousness. Edmond Dantes, betrayed into imprisonment for 14 years of his life, escapes to unlimited wealth with only one thing on his mind: vengeance. The first third of the book fairly races along, as Edmond is first betrayed, and then imprisoned.
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