The Cosmic Puppets (Gollancz) and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
Buy Used
£2.80
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by the book house
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: The book has been read, but is in excellent condition. Pages are intact and not marred by notes or highlighting. The spine remains undamaged.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Cosmic Puppets Paperback – 7 Dec 1998


See all 13 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
£23.27
Paperback, 7 Dec 1998
£24.32 £0.01


Product details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Voyager; (Reissue) edition (7 Dec. 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0006482864
  • ISBN-13: 978-0006482864
  • Product Dimensions: 13.8 x 0.9 x 18.9 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 1,805,801 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, and more.

Product Description

Review

‘The greatest American novelist of the second half of the 20th century’
Norman Spinrad

‘A great philosophical writer’
Independent

‘The most brilliant sci-fi mind on any planet’
Rolling Stone

Book Description

A typically unsettling tale of different realities from a master of the genre. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse and search another edition of this book.
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt | Back Cover
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
" When Ted Barton follows an inner compulsion and returns to Millgate, Virginia, the isolated, sleepy town of his birth, he is troubled to find that the place bears no resemblance to the one he left all those years before. It's even more alarming to realise that it never did. And when Ted discovers that in this Millgate Ted Barton died of scarlet fever at the age of nine, he knows there's something seriously amiss. Imprisoned there by a mysterious and unseen barrier, Ted attempts to find the reason for the disquieting anomalies, only to become enmeshed in a desperate and epic struggle of cosmic importance."
- from the back cover

Written in 1953 and published in 1957, Cosmic Puppets (Dick's fourth published novel) is possibly his shortest novel. It explores a number of themes Dick had an abiding interest in (and would bring out more fully in later novels), most specifically the nature of reality and the impact on people when reality as they understand it starts to unravel around them.

As with all PKD's works this novel makes you marvel at his imagination but also (if you are of a philosophical turn of mind) brings you to question and consider the themes he raises for yourself.

"[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."
-- Paul Williams, Rolling Stone

"The most consistently brilliant SF writer in the world"
-- John Brunner

"I see Dick as a major twenty-first century writer, an influential 'fictional philosopher' of the quantum age.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Lark TOP 1000 REVIEWER on 21 April 2009
Format: Paperback
This is one of Philip K Dick's popular or pulp sci fi books, it doesnt have quite as much existential angst and musing as some of his books and yet it is still a great work of science fiction.

Broadly the book fits into the genre archetype of a protagonist trapped in an artificial environment, having experienced a compulsion to visit a town off the beaten track the central character discovers he can not leave the town and begins to suspect things are not what they seem.

Characters are brilliantly rendered, characters struggling with their experience of the weird and inexplicable, seeking to rationalise what could as easily be construed as madness or mass hysteria are rendered believeably as only PKD really can.

The build up and closing scenes are brilliant and the book leaves the reader with that rare sort of sorrow, you can reread it but you cant ever have that experience of reading it for the first time again.

While this is science fiction, set in a broadly speaking contemporaneous setting/the recent past, a lot of the features of the story wouldnt be out of place in sword and sorcery fantasy or fable. It should as a result appeal to a wider audience than PKD's usual readers, in fact I would recommend it to general readers and its a short read too so perfect for holidays and short breaks away.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you have ever moved away from an area you've grown up in, particularly as a child, then returned some years later you will know that mix of the familiar with the unfamiliar as you recognise some things but also see other things have changed. For Ted Barton it's a little different, on returning to the town he grew up in he doesn't recognise anything; all the buildings and people are completely different from what he remembers. The Cosmic Puppets follows Ted Barton as he tries to uncover the mysteries of his missing town, and the strange behaviour of some of the children.
The 1957 novel stands at just over 150 pages thick, and, coupled with the simplicity of Dick's writing, can be devoured in a single sitting. Leaning more towards fantasy than science fiction this novel could be a disappointment for readers coming from the likes of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, however if you come to it with no expectations then you can be swept away by the fantastic story. The one thing that lets The Cosmic Puppets down is the lack of character development, Dick doesn't take any time to build an emotional connection between the reader and the characters which means we are left with far less interest in what happens to them than in his others books
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Ted Barton decides on a whim to return and visit the town of his birth, Millgate. When he gets there he finds it it completely different to how he remembered it.Non of the streets have the same name, the shops are different, and no one remembers him. A little further investigation reveals that some one of his name died of scarlet fever around the time he left the town. It is all very strange, and when he tries to leave, he finds that he can't.

As he reluctantly stays in the town, he see ghostlike figures wandering past, and meets people who also seem to remember the town as it once was. As he learns more he realises that it is a focal point for two cosmological giants.

PKD has a way of taking a reality that you know and are familiar with and twisting it. In this book the twist is a full 180 degrees, as the reality he conjures up is familiar and utterly different. He manages to bring a touch of gothic horror into the book too. The writing is a little dated, but then it was published in 1957.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews



Feedback