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The Corporation [DVD] [2006]


Price: £4.45 & FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Details
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The Corporation [DVD] [2006] + Inside Job [DVD] [2011] + Four Horsemen [DVD]
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Product details

  • Actors: Mikela Jay, Rob Beckwermert, Christopher Gora, Nina Jones, Richard Kopycinski
  • Directors: Jennifer Abbott, Mark Achbar
  • Writers: Mark Achbar, Harold Crooks, Joel Bakan, Thomas Shandel
  • Producers: Bart Simpson, Cari Green
  • Format: PAL
  • Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 4:3 - 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Classification: PG
  • Studio: In 2 Film
  • DVD Release Date: 9 Oct 2006
  • Run Time: 145 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000P1KTEQ
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 9,760 in DVD & Blu-ray (See Top 100 in DVD & Blu-ray)

Reviews

Thought-provoking political documentary by Canadian filmmakers Jennifer Abbott and Mark Achbar. In the mid-19th century, American corporations began to be legally recognised as individuals, a move that has given them unprecedented rights. In collaboration with novelist Joel Bakan, the filmmakers pose the question: if a corporation was a person, what sort of person would it be? Applying psychiatric principles and social research, they come to the conclusion that this 'person' would be a power-hungry, egocentric and highly destructive psychopath. The film won Best Documentary World Cinema Audience Award at the 2004 Sundance Film Festival.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

60 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Frank T on 7 Oct 2009
Format: DVD
Don't be put off by the less than subtle cover, or by the first few minutes of in-your-face agitprop - this is a thoughtful and well-constructed polemic against the power of big business. It seeks to persuade not by hysterical finger-pointing, but by exposition of facts and by interviews with well-informed individuals from the media, the corporate world and academe. Half of the interviewees are corporate "insiders", some of them glibly agreeing that there should be more regulation of business, some of them arguing, amusingly, that the problems of the world are due to residual excessive government regulation.

Above all, this film is highly informative. It starts with a history of the corporation, which, in case you didn't know (and I didn't) is a company with the legal status of an individual human being. This is interesting implications for accountability: when a corporation acts illegally, usually the worst than can happen is an expensive fine or out-of-court settlement. Prison sentences for individual directors are usually out of the question, because the entity acting illegally is the business, not the individuals who run it. It is also interesting to find out that a corporation has a legal DUTY, in the United States, to put the interests of its shareholders above all other considerations.

The film traces how lobbying has concentrated power in the hands of the corporations, to the extent that they are today at least as powerful as the politicians supposedly elected to represent the American people. Finally come some long case studies, including the (successful) attempts by FOX News to block the broadcast of a report by two of its journalists on the harmful effects of Monsanto's hormone treatment for cows to increase milk yield.
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84 of 89 people found the following review helpful By Rory Ridley-Duff on 14 Aug 2009
Format: DVD
Since discovering this documentary, I have - with the film makers' support - successfully developed study materials that enhance learning and teaching on my university's degree programmes. It is, without doubt, the most stimulating and riveting documentary you are likely to see about the nature and impact of contemporary business thinking.

The great strength of the documentary is the quality of the input from all sections of society, whether academic experts, corporate executives, social activists or members of the public. Arguments and debates are not fudged, they are all tackled head on. Regardless of whether the issue is market accountability, branding and advertising, the profit motive, environmental sustainability or workplace democracy, defenders and critics of The Corporation are given ample scope to discuss different points of view. You can hear directly from Milton Friedman, Naomi Klein, Robert Monks and Noam Chomsky. You can witness for yourself heated dialogue between workers and managers, or demonstrators and corporate executives.

This documentary is a prima facie example of the way journalism can transform our ability to learn in a democratic society. Free speech - however unpleasant to the listener - is the life-blood of an informed electorate who can then use their knowledge to shape political action.

As a student resource (with the film-makers' consent) we produced 30 minute edited versions and learning materials aimed at stimulating debate amongst students. The reaction has been first rate, with many seeking out the full 150 minute documentary or demanding that it be made available for follow up study.
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By SH on 23 Jun 2009
Format: DVD
'The Corporation' is a 2003 Canadian documentary and another one of those films you will not see in any theaters near you, because it touches on a subject which makes those in power feel very uncomfortable.

THE CORPORATION is a well-organised and deeply fascinating docu-film about the growing prominence of large global businesses, and the way that their decisions are impacting the world.

The film shows how corporations have ballooned in size and power since the industrial revolution, and explains the laws and loopholes that allow them to remain nearly unaccountable for their actions. If they break a law, they are willing to admit guilt and pay the fine, because the profits outweigh the penalties. Therefore, they continue to cause serious environmental problems by dumping waste into rivers and oceans and by depleting natural resources, resulting in irreversible damage to the earth which also poses a serious threat to human life.

Beyond environmental issues, the film shows how corporations exploit underpaid labourers in third world countries, violate basic human rights, make deals with foreign countries who are known enemies of the U.S., and in some instances perpetuate fascist regimes. Valuable, informative talking-head commentary comes from a diverse group including Ray Anderson, CEO of carpet manufacturer Interface; Sir Mark Moody-Stuart, former chairman of Royal Dutch Shell; Dr. Vandana Shiva, feminist and ecologist; Milton Friedman, Nobel prize-winning economist; Marc Barry, corporate spy; Joe Badaracco, professor of business ethics at Harvard; and activists Noam Chomsky, Howard Zinn, and Michael Moore.
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