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The Complete Persepolis Paperback – 3 Nov 2007


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Product details

  • Paperback: 341 pages
  • Publisher: Random House Inc (3 Nov 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375714839
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375714832
  • Product Dimensions: 15.3 x 2.6 x 22.5 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 121,789 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Marjane Satrapi was born in 1969 in Rasht, Iran. She now lives in Paris where she is a regular contributor to magazines and newspapers throughout the world, including the New Yorker and the New York Times. She is the author of several children's books, as well as the critically acclaimed and internationally bestselling memoir Persepolis, which has been translated into twelve languages, and was awarded the first Fernando Bueso Blanco Peace Prize in Spain. Her other books include Embroideries and Chicken With Plums.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Mum of the animals VINE VOICE on 20 Nov 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a graphic novel about Marjane's childhood and early adulthood in Iran. It combines the joy of reading a comic book with a real insight to life in Iran - through her eyes. It was no effort to read - in fact it was a absolute page turner but at the end of it I still felt I had a much better understanding of recent Iranian history and its impact on ordinary people than before. It is very funny, and winsome but she never loses sight of the pity of it all. Imagine, her liberal family with fine revolutionary credentials suddenly had to wear a veil/grow a beard and live in a religious state. How do they adapt? She describes her family and friends's reluctant conformity with great wit but in a manner that is sensitive to the background thunder of political executions, fear, torture and war. I cannot wait for the film.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Morena VINE VOICE on 15 Feb 2008
Format: Paperback
Amazing read! Through the narration of the author's spirited, likeable and slightly mad younger self growing up in Iran, the reader learns so much about life there from an insider's perspective, without ever feeling even remotely lectured to. The illustrations are original and witty, and draw you into the world Marjane Satrapi vividly evokes. The characters of her family, friends and neighbours are very well portrayed and there are definitely more than a few laughs despite (because of?) the serious subject matter.

If you know French, I really recommend getting the original, because the graphic novel format makes it very easy and motivating to read and the conversational style will be a nice change from textbooks and newspapers! If not, the English translation is very good and was supervised by Marjane Satrapi herself, whose English is good enough to make sure the sense has been captured exactly by the translator (a friend of hers, I think I remember reading).

Also, the Amazon price at the time of writing is an absolute bargain, if you are getting all four books in one! I bought mine separately for about that price each!
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Format: Paperback
Currently very hyped but deservedly so. Wonderfully personal, often in touching and tragic ways. A comic without caricatures, Persepolis is, without hyperbole, a modern classic. Politically astute and subtle, noone emerges clean from the various machinations that have besieged Iran in the last decades, which is not to say that Satrapi refuses allegiances. On the contrary, the themes of political discovery and commitment that form a major subtheme only reinforce the Marxist-flavoured analyses of her father, and her implicit seconding of them. The eventual political tone is robustly anti-authoritarian - more like the Bakunin recommended to a young Sartrapi by a poser punk that she may like to think. Technically, the economies of line and shade are accomplished, as is the use of dialogue and gesture. Very much recommended. It may even be better than Maus.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By I Read, Therefore I Blog VINE VOICE on 12 April 2010
Format: Paperback
Satrapi's graphic novel is a sensitive, often witty and beautifully drawn account not only of her life, but also of life in Iran. It's not without its problems - notably a tendency to sentimentality - but it's still well worth a look.
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Format: Paperback
Review: Marjane Satrapi grew up in Terahn, Iran, during the Islamic Revolution. Later, she is sent to Austria, on her own, for her own safety, and the second half of the graphic novel tells us the story of her return to Iran after four years of a totally different life.
I don’t normally read autobiographies, but I’ve heard excellent things about this. I wasn’t disappointed.
A bit at the start is the Iranian war in graphic novel form, which is useful and really interesting because history lessons don't really teach anything outside of the Western world so having it all put like this is really good for setting up the world Marji lives in, as well as generally expanding world history knowledge.
The thing about Persepolis is the way it presents it. I like history, but i'm bad at remembering it if it's just a list of dates and events and figures. The difference with Persepolis here is that it shows a different view on it. Marji is ten when her school gets gender segregation and the girls are forced to wear veils, and Marji's young age changes the way you see everything. It adds questions, thoughts, and makes you wonder and understand even more.
You get to know Marji really well. You share all her ups and downs, all the hopes and aspirations and sadness and loss. You see her childhood and her liberal family and everything they go through. The second part, set during her time in Austria and her return to Tehran, shows her doing some things that may not be the best decision, but she learns from them. I also liked some of the other characters-Marji's grandmother especially.

Overall: Strength 4.5, more a 5 tea to an informative and powerful graphic novel.
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By Fay on 27 Mar 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a fascinating read for both the story and the artistic drawings to enable us to understand the emotions in such a clear way. This is a vital read for anyone living outside of Iran.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By lexo1941 on 21 Dec 2008
Format: Paperback
Unlike some reviewers of "Persepolis", I came to it as someone who has read quite a lot of graphic novels. I wouldn't call myself an expert on the form, but I know my way around. You still get literary journalists complaining when graphic novels get nominated for literary prizes, on the grounds that a graphic novel by definition is a lesser artistic achievement than a novel that consists entirely of words. Many commentators seem to believe that graphic works are not, and can never be, as profound and as intelligent and as moving as pure text.

In the last fifteen or so years, a number of books have been published which by virtue of their sheer excellence are powerful rebuttals to that idea. Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell's "From Hell" is one (forget the movie). Chris Ware's "Jimmy Corrigan: The Smartest Kid on Earth" is another. One of the greatest fictional works of the last twenty years is Neil Gaiman's extraordinary epic "The Sandman".

For those that are uncomfortable with fiction, there is an entire genre of graphic books that recount and reimagine actual experiences: Guy Delisle's "Pyongyang" and Joe Sacco's "Palestine" are outstanding examples. Marjane Satrapi's "Persepolis" is another. Its success is well-deserved.

Satrapi's graphic style is simple, but it's not a fake simplicity. Her drawings of the guardians of the Iranian revolution, for example, are stereotyped, in that she draws them all the same way: cap pulled down over the eyes, stiff jacket, bushy beard, rifle. But in doing so, she successfully conveys a sense of how stereotyped and unimaginative the guardians themselves are. She makes them look like robots because it's part of her overall artistic purpose.

When she wants to be eloquent, she is fully capable of it.
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