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The Complete Birth Of The Cool
 
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The Complete Birth Of The Cool

7 May 1998 | Format: MP3

£7.99 (VAT included if applicable)
Also available in CD Format
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
2:34
30
2
3:13
30
3
3:20
30
4
3:12
30
5
2:35
30
6
2:49
30
7
3:10
30
8
3:01
30
9
3:06
30
10
2:18
30
11
3:15
30
12
3:24
30
13
0:17
30
14
1:02
30
15
3:42
30
16
3:42
30
17
5:51
30
18
0:25
30
19
4:23
30
20
3:08
30
21
3:26
30
22
4:23
30
23
4:48
30
24
3:46
30
25
4:21
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Product details

  • Original Release Date: 7 May 1998
  • Release Date: 7 May 1998
  • Label: Blue Note Records
  • Copyright: (C) 1998 Capitol Records, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:19:11
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001JKA3XO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 105,161 in Albums (See Top 100 in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 36 people found the following review helpful By MikeG on 5 Jan. 2004
Format: Audio CD
The music on this CD was recorded in 1949/50, but acquired its famous album title only retrospectively, in 1957. As a jazz term, ‘cool’ means something more specific than the vague, all-purpose adjective it has since become. It came to particular prominence in the 1950s to describe a more cerebral, less impassioned way of playing jazz. It’s generally supposed that these sessions were part of the inspiration for the ‘cool school’ of jazz.which flourished especially on the American west coast in the 1950s. That’s the main reason for the historical importance of the ‘Birth of the Cool’ sessions and the album may therefore be of more appeal to those interested in the historical development of jazz than to listeners who merely enjoy Miles’s own playing.
The historical interest centres primarily on these pieces as examples of jazz composition and arrangement. Along with the work of composer-arranger Tadd Dameron and some of Gil Evans’s arranging for the Claude Thornhill Band, these scores were innovative in adapting the procedures of ‘Be-Bop’ to orchestrated jazz and in the ways in which they deployed the instruments of the nine-piece band, which included, unusually, French horn and tuba alongside trumpet, trombone and alto and baritone saxes. They skilfully exploit the variety of timbres and tone colours to create a sound suggestive of a larger band. This is especially true of Evans’s pieces, which show his interest in rich, unusual and shifting chord voicings, although Mulligan’s arrangements also create some full-sounding, inventive passages.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Victor HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on 19 Mar. 2012
Format: Audio CD
Back in 1949/50, Miles Davis and eight friends recorded 3 sessions. The results were released as singles, then collected together and released in 1957 as `Birth Of The Cool' under the name of Miles Davis. But the other names in the group should not be overlooked, they read like a who's who of 50's and 60's cool and freeform jazz, with people like Gerry Mulligan, Max Roach and Gil Evans all making important contributions.

Davis had just finished a turbulent period as a sideman to Charlie Parker, where he seems to have felt restricted and out of place. The aim of these recordings appears to have been to allow each musician and arranger to express themselves fully and comfortably in a relaxed atmosphere.

Stylistically this was a move away from the bebop that most of the group had recorded previously, and truly was the start of the `Cool' hard bop movement that moved away from the frenetic phrasings of bebop and gave way to longer, more complex pieces with experimentations in rhythm, sometimes dissonance and interesting interactions between the group members. But the key word seems to be `relaxed'.

Still limited to the three minute single format there isn't quite the room for each member to stretch out as there would be when Miles embraced the LP format. This is a bit of a shame given the number of musicians involved, and the odd range of instruments played (not many jazz tracks featured tuba or French horn since the early days of Armstrong's hot fives and sevens), but this is still an impressive album that really lays down the vision that Miles had for his musical future, and delivers 11 tracks of inventive, interesting and gripping cool jazz.
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Format: Audio CD
If we were talking about a painting or piece of pottery from 1950 we would call it an antique - that's 64 years ago. A person born then would be an old age pensioner now! And though parts of this album do sound a bit dated - particularly the singer and announcer, Miles sounds as fresh as ever.

It is fascinating to hear Cool emerging from Swing and Bebop and to try and imagine what it sounded like to jazz fans of the time. Probably after the dazzling pyrotechnics of Bebop it came as a soothing - maybe even meditative - relief. Jazz had always been an extrovert music - for the most part music for dancing to. This began to change with Ellington's compositions. However, the real change to an introvert music came with Miles hauntingly beautiful sound and Gil Evans arrangements which express the nuanced subtleties, complexity and neuroses of man in the atomic age. In a sense Cool is the music of the damaged man who has lost the old certainties - thanks partly to Nietzsche - but mainly two catastrophic world wars which left him unable to sing with confidence any more. Miles said he could not bear to be around confident people and listening to his music you can hear why.

This is undoubtedly a great album - not Miles' best but important for the direction it was to aim jazz in.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This item is brilliant. I shall be recommending the seller to others.
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