The Colour of Law and over 2 million other books are available for Amazon Kindle . Learn more
FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Dispatched from and sold by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantity:1
The Colour Of Law has been added to your Basket
FREE Delivery on orders over £10.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book is eligible for free delivery anywhere in the UK. Your order will be picked, packed and dispatched by Amazon. Buy with confidence!
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Colour Of Law Paperback – 28 Feb 2013


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
£7.99
£2.62 £0.01
Audio CD
"Please retry"
£19.26
£7.99 FREE Delivery in the UK on orders over £10. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Dispatched from and sold by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Colour Of Law + Accused + The Abduction
Price For All Three: £24.97

Buy the selected items together


Product details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Sphere (28 Feb. 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0751551104
  • ISBN-13: 978-0751551105
  • Product Dimensions: 12.9 x 2.7 x 19.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (81 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 58,326 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born and educated in Texas, Mark Gimenez attended law school at Notre Dame, Indiana and practised with a large Dallas law firm. He is married with two sons.

Product Description

Review

A good story, which Gimenez tells with passion and conviction (SUNDAY TELEGRAPH)

Gimenez has delivered a readable story with a central character who's extremely interesting. We'll be back with A. Scott Finney in the future, I have no doubt. (EVENING HERALD)

Warning: You will lose an entire lazy Sunday to this one. (TIME OUT)

I read it at one sitting . . . Gimenez has created a complex and believable character who carries a story that still intrigues (OBSERVER)

Book Description

When a hotshot Dallas lawyer is asked to defend a black prostitute accused of murder, he is forced to question everything he previously held dear. This is a legal thriller in which the ruthless politics of corporate law come face to face with the ethics of public defence.

Inside This Book (Learn More)
Browse Sample Pages
Front Cover | Copyright | Excerpt
Search inside this book:

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By John on 10 Aug. 2007
Format: Paperback
This is a an excellent read-highly recommended. Like Grisham, Giminez clearly has a very poor opinion of lawyers and the American legal system.
Scott Fenney is a corporate lawyer who is in it to make money. He makes the mistake of giving an idealistic speech to a group of lawyers. While he does not mean what he says an experienced judge hears him and appoints him to defend a black heroin addicted prostitute who is accused of murdering the son of the Texan senator. The senator is likely to be the next president of America. The first third of the book paints Scott in a very poor light as he wheels and deals, makes money for himself and his firm. He tries to wriggle out of defending the prostitute by getting Bobby his best buddy from law school who is a struggling street lawyer to take his place. Gradually Bobby, Scott's daughter and the daughter of the accused win Scott round and he agrees to take the case.
All the might of corporate America is then brought to bear on Scott and he loses everything.
The book is full of cliches and might not be everyones cup of tea. Would a corporate lawyer take or indeed be qualified to defend someone accused of murder? Gimenez goes on a bit too much about the vagaries of lawyers. He does though get you to like Scott in the second half of the book and by the time the trial comes round you will be just willing him to get the better of the all powerful but corrupt establishment that is lined up against him.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By samcam on 3 Feb. 2009
Format: Paperback
Loved this book and was really surprised at how good it was. Great characters and a wonderful plot reminiscent of To Kill A Mockingbird. Loved A Scott and his daughter Boo, thought the relationship between them was briliiantly written, although I felt the author could have portrayed the wife Rebecca, a little less one dimensional, do women like this really exist? Wonderful story though and while of course the outcome is a little bit predictable, the journey is well worth it. Will definitely rush out to buy Mark Giminez other books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By ceriithomas on 15 Feb. 2010
Format: Paperback
Fenney is a high-flying partner of a leading Dallas law firm. Despite joining the legal profession to become another Atticus Finch (of To Kill the Mockingbird), Fenney quickly abandons principles for money. By overcharging rich clients, he enjoys a lavish lifestyle in the exclusive Highland Park neighbourhood. It seems as though nothing could dampen his success.

But when a senator's son is murdered, allegedly by a prostitute from a poor neighbourhood, a federal judge insists that he represents her pro bono. He fosters the accused's daughter, and becomes so absorbed in defending her as to sacrifice everything (job, wife, home, social status) to keep her from death row.

The scenario presents fertile ground, but is portrayed rather unconvincingly. Would a defence lawyer really foster a prostitute's daughter? Would he sacrifice so much to save just one client? And how did he end up becoming partner of a commercial law firm when what he really wanted was to become another Atticus Finch?

Read it, enjoy it, but don't expect to be convinced by it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kali on 19 July 2007
Format: Paperback
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
What a find!, July 15, 2007

I wasn't sure what to expect from this book when I purchased it but to may amazement it managed to exceed all my expectations.

If I had to describe Mark Gimenez's writing style I'd say is a cross between Grisham and P.D James because it has all the impact of a court room thriller and all the suspense of a "whodunnit."

Scott Fennney is not a likable character when we first meet him, he's a hard headed young lawyer who has managed to pull himself up by his bootstraps from his poor origins to live in a rich area of Dallas, Texas with his lovely but coldly ambitious wife Rebecca and his equally lovely daughter but much nicer daughter Boo, named after a character in the book "To Kill a Mockingbird."

Once upon a time Scott did have scruples and morals but they have long disappeared and he now lives the big expensive life with a multi-million dollar house, drives a Ferrari and represents those who can pay his fat fees.

And then out of the blue he is asked by a judge who still believes the right of a fair trial for every defendant to represent a drug addicted mixed race prostitute called Shawanda who is accused of murdering the white son of a very powerful man, a Senator no less who might one day be the next president of the USA. Shawanda says she didn't kill the Senator's son but it was her gun that ended the life of the violent spoilt 30 year old and she had taken his car which was found not far from where she lived in the projects.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Watson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 11 April 2011
Format: Paperback
This debut novel is sufficiently interesting for me to have just picked up a copy of 'Accused', the follow-on to 'The Colour of Law'. I hope it is somewhat better than this first novel in the way it deals with the character-building lifestyle of the main protagonust, Dallas commercial lawyer A.Scott Fenney. It's not that there's anything wrong with the way the story pans out, it's just that everything falls into place for the main people involved far too easily, notwithstanding the enormous pressures plied on to Fenny.

He becomes a criminal lawyer in order to defend a black hooker on a charge of murdering the son of a would-be US President, resulting, therefore, in all manner of social depravations for Fenney and his family. If you overlook this smoothing out of what for anyone else would be life shattering and concentrate on the underbelly of corporate Texas, the story is good. Mark Gimenez knows his onions and as he peels back the layers, it's enough to make anyone weep.

Even so, it's a bit twee but I'm looking forward to 'Accused' in the hope Fenney's charcater improves as, I believe, he now has to defend his divorced wife. Oh happy days.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Look for similar items by category


Feedback