Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Amazon Fire TV Amazon Pantry Food & Drink Beauty Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars8
4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
3
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£11.99+ Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on 23 February 2011
I was prompted to write a review of this book by the unfair and disparaging remarks made in another review by 'King Arthur'. It needs to be remembered that Ken Ford's book was the first on the subject of the Cockleshell Raiders since the publication of C.E. Lucas Phillip's account in 1956 (a book which Blondie Hasler regarded as his memoirs) and, with one or two exceptions, he makes a very good fist of it. Yes, he gets the dimensions of the Cockle MKII wrong, and mistakenly places the execution site for Sergeant Wallace and Marine Ewart at Chateau Magnol (they ended their lives against a stake in a sand pit in a forest a few miles to the north east of Bordeaux) but these do not in any way justify the extraordinary attack on the book made by King Arthur. The reviewer should be thoroughly ashamed of himself. Mr Ford's book is in fact well written, introduces a few more elements to the story than were known beforehand and benefits from some superb artistry. Osprey and Mr Ford deserve to be congratulated on this publication. I know that they will, when the book is republished, rectify the few minor errors that are contained in this edition.
0Comment9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 25 January 2011
Ignore the spiteful review above. This is an excellent book. Well written and very well researched. And very reasonably priced too. It's certainly the best account of the raid that I've read.
44 comments9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
I became interested in the Cockleshell heroes after reading in our local paper how a Co-op milkman born in Stockport had joined up and become one of these heroes.

Unfortunately his canoe became damaged and he and his companion managed to get to dry land but were found, arrested, handed over to the gestapo, tortured and shot.

I found the book a good read and I know from past experience that I shall be reading it again one day.

For me, that is a good recommendation.
0Comment6 of 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
The perfect companion for all military history enthusiasts is: THE ROMA VICTRIX WINE BEAKERCalix Imperium, Roma Victrix Pewter wine beaker

Those who are movie buffs may recall the 1955 British film 'Cockleshell Heroes'. It was the usual fare one expects from a movie and was loosely based on a daring and successful commando raid of 1942.

Author Ken Ford looks at the development of the team and their equipment, the planning that went into the raid as well as the full story of the harrowing trip up river from the surviving crew and from German records of the interrogation of the captured crews.

Superbly illustrated with period photos and 3D Maps we are drawn into the story of these men and what they had to endure on this most hazardous mission. It is very much a gripping tale that I thoroughly enjoyed.
0Comment1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 21 January 2011
Though I'm admittedly something of a WWII novice (I'm a history student, but the 20th C isn't my speciality), I found this book really useful. It was the perfect preliminary research tool, giving a fast-moving and accessible, but also consistently informative, account of the mission. The illustrations were also judged well to keep everything clear, though I have to admit I'm not a huge fan of the 'original artwork', being more of a photograph and map type. I was even able to impress a professor with a couple of details he hadn't been aware of!
11 comment7 of 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 5 June 2014
Operation "Frankton" was a WWII commando raid against German occupied French port of Bordeaux, which took place from 7 to 12 December 1942. Its target were German and Italian blockade-runners - large, fast modern cargo ships which travelled between Bordeaux and Japan, carrying precious, strategically important loads of advanced machinery to Japan and rubber, tungsten, tin, vegetal oils, silk, opium and quinine on their way back.

The raid was carried out by a small elite unit of Royal Marines, who were trained in using canoes (nick named "cockleshells") to carry themselves and their weapons to their targets. The commandos disembarked from a British submarine, HMS "Tuna", in Gironde estuary. They then paddled their boats up the river Garonne, travelling by night and hiding in reeds during the day, all the way to the port of Bordeaux, where those who made it that far attacked their targets with limpet mines. After placing the mines commandos paddled out of the port, scuttled their boats and continued on foot to try to make contact with French Resistance, in order to be exfiltrated to neutral Spain. Not all succeeded...

This is a very good book, quite comprehensive for its size (64 pages), well written, well illustrated, with good maps and a very good colour plate by Howard Gerrard. It also describes very much in detail the infamous Kommandobefehl issued secretly by Hitler before the raid took place - and about which Royal Marines knew nothing, even if it had to have a great influence on the destiny of some of them...

Without affecting my five star rating of this book, I would just like to signal one important thing, for a possible second edition of this book. On the page in which we can see a detailed drawing of equipement and weaponry of commandos, everything is shown, including limpet mines - but their personal weapons (which I supposed were some kind of handguns and knives) are completely absent...

Also in the introduction Ken Ford managed to make some blunders, by saying that Germans made efforts against Moscow in 1942 (they didn't), that Vichy government in France was just a puppet regime (it wasn't - an overwhelming majority of French still considered it as their true and legitimate government in 1942) and that at the time of raid French "police and militia" rounded all opposants to German occupation (true for the police - but the infamous "Milice Francaise" was created only on 30 January 1943...). But those are minor points, on first two pages - and they don't have much influence on the rest of the book.

I learned quite a lot from this book, including that, unlike what I thought, this operation had a surprisingly low priority level - and as result HMS "Tuna" was ordered to attack any German targets she would met on her way EVEN if that would prevent operation "Frankton" from being launched...

If there is one thing I would like to see added to this book, that would be the name of at least one French policeman who handed captured British commandos to Germans - I am really curious if they were ever identified and what happened to those guys...

Bottom line, this is a really great book in Osprey Raid series. A recommended reading. Enjoy!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
TOP 500 REVIEWERon 5 June 2014
Operation "Frankton" was a WWII commando raid against German occupied French port of Bordeaux, which took place from 7 to 12 December 1942. Its target were German and Italian blockade-runners - large, fast modern cargo ships which travelled between Bordeaux and Japan, carrying precious, strategically important loads of advanced machinery to Japan and rubber, tungsten, tin, vegetal oils, silk, opium and quinine on their way back.

The raid was carried out by a small elite unit of Royal Marines, who were trained in using canoes (nick named "cockleshells") to carry themselves and their weapons to their targets. The commandos disembarked from a British submarine, HMS "Tuna", in Gironde estuary. They then paddled their boats up the river Garonne, travelling by night and hiding in reeds during the day, all the way to the port of Bordeaux, where those who made it that far attacked their targets with limpet mines. After placing the mines commandos paddled out of the port, scuttled their boats and continued on foot to try to make contact with French Resistance, in order to be exfiltrated to neutral Spain. Not all succeeded...

This is a very good book, quite comprehensive for its size (64 pages), well written, well illustrated, with good maps and a very good colour plate by Howard Gerrard. It also describes very much in detail the infamous Kommandobefehl issued secretly by Hitler before the raid took place - and about which Royal Marines knew nothing, even if it had to have a great influence on the destiny of some of them...

Without affecting my five star rating of this book, I would just like to signal one important thing, for a possible second edition of this book. On the page in which we can see a detailed drawing of equipement and weaponry of commandos, everything is shown, including limpet mines - but their personal weapons (which I supposed were some kind of handguns and knives) are completely absent...

Also in the introduction Ken Ford managed to make some blunders, by saying that Germans made efforts against Moscow in 1942 (they didn't), that Vichy government in France was just a puppet regime (it wasn't - an overwhelming majority of French still considered it as their true and legitimate government in 1942) and that at the time of raid French "police and militia" rounded all opposants to German occupation (true for the police - but the infamous "Milice Francaise" was created only on 30 January 1943...). But those are minor points, on first two pages - and they don't have much influence on the rest of the book.

I learned quite a lot from this book, including that, unlike what I thought, this operation had a surprisingly low priority level - and as result HMS "Tuna" was ordered to attack any German targets she would met on her way EVEN if that would prevent operation "Frankton" from being launched...

If there is one thing I would like to see added to this book, that would be the name of at least one French policeman who handed captured British commandos to Germans - I am really curious if they were ever identified and what happened to those guys...

Bottom line, this is a really great book in Osprey Raid series. A recommended reading. Enjoy!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse
on 30 March 2013
A book of its time. It adequately describes the preparation and execution of the operation. Interesting but now a Little dated.
0Comment1 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you?YesNoReport abuse

Customers also viewed these items


Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Sponsored Links

  (What is this?)
  -  
Get All New Nike Shoes Here. Shop Footaction Today - Own It.