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The Cobra
 
 

The Cobra [Kindle Edition]

Frederick Forsyth
3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (118 customer reviews)

Print List Price: £7.99
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Product Description

Amazon.co.uk Review

Writers such as Lee Child may be brand names these days, but the name of Frederick Forsyth is something special in terms of conveying a certain kind of thriller to the reader. The technical brilliance of his debut The Day of the Jackal (with its forensically researched documentary style) virtually changed the face of the modern thriller, and its follow-up, the almost equally compelling The Odessa File (dealing with the still all-too-current themes of the Arab-Israeli conflict and chemical weapons), demonstrated that Forsyth had forged a very individual style. Subsequently, The Dogs of War utilised the author’s own African experiences, and his take on the ruthlessness of mercenaries and the corrupt states that employed them made for some blistering reading – that book was topical at the time, and has remained so. Frederick Forsyth admirers are aware that he can’t attain Olympian heights with every trip to the post, but know that he is always worth our attention.

As is the case with his new book, The Cobra, a globe-trotting thriller that evokes memories of the author's vintage work. Cultivated ex-CIA man Paul Devereux is handed a tough assignment: write finis to the lethal activities of the worst of the drug barons, and inflict damage on an industry that is worth billions per annum. He is given unlimited resources: money, weapons and manpower, and his ace-in-the-hole is the tough Calvin Dexter, who becomes executive officer of the new Project Cobra. It’s a highly dangerous business for everyone involved, and the team Devereux puts together is obliged to match in ruthlessness their pitiless drug-dealing opponents.

With the customary massive panoply we expect from him, Forsyth reminds us how this kind of thriller should be delivered. --Barry Forshaw

Amazon Review

Writers such as Lee Child may be brand names these days, but the name of Frederick Forsyth is something special in terms of conveying a certain kind of thriller to the reader. The technical brilliance of his debut The Day of the Jackal (with its forensically researched documentary style) virtually changed the face of the modern thriller, and its follow-up, the almost equally compelling The Odessa File (dealing with the still all-too-current themes of the Arab-Israeli conflict and chemical weapons), demonstrated that Forsyth had forged a very individual style. Subsequently, The Dogs of War utilised the author’s own African experiences, and his take on the ruthlessness of mercenaries and the corrupt states that employed them made for some blistering reading – that book was topical at the time, and has remained so. Frederick Forsyth admirers are aware that he can’t attain Olympian heights with every trip to the post, but know that he is always worth our attention.

As is the case with his new book, The Cobra, a globe-trotting thriller that evokes memories of the author's vintage work. Cultivated ex-CIA man Paul Devereux is handed a tough assignment: write finis to the lethal activities of the worst of the drug barons, and inflict damage on an industry that is worth billions per annum. He is given unlimited resources: money, weapons and manpower, and his ace-in-the-hole is the tough Calvin Dexter, who becomes executive officer of the new Project Cobra. It’s a highly dangerous business for everyone involved, and the team Devereux puts together is obliged to match in ruthlessness their pitiless drug-dealing opponents.

With the customary massive panoply we expect from him, Forsyth reminds us how this kind of thriller should be delivered. --Barry Forshaw


Product details

  • Format: Kindle Edition
  • File Size: 435 KB
  • Print Length: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Transworld Digital (19 Aug 2010)
  • Sold by: Amazon Media EU S.à r.l.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003XVYEBE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (118 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #4,441 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Frederick Forsyth is the author of a number of bestselling novels including The Day of the Jackel, The Odessa File, The Dogs of War, The Devil's Alternative and The Fourth Protocol. He lives in Hertfordshire, England. www.frederickforsyth.co.uk

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
98 of 110 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Big Waste Of Time And Money! 20 Aug 2010
By Bobbewig TOP 1000 REVIEWER
Format:Hardcover
Being a big fan of Frederick Forsyth since his debut book, The Day of the Jackel, I was looking forward to reading his latest, The Cobra. However, much to my surprise, The Cobra is a major disappointment and, in my opinion, Forsyth's worst book to-date by far. To Forsyth's credit, the premise of The Cobra is an interesting and timely one. The premise is that the President of the U.S has decided to destroy the cocaine industry once and for all, and paves the way for a man called The Cobra (who used to run Special Ops for the CIA) to develop and execute a plan to accomplish this assignment. The Cobra is given carte blanche for anything he needs to accomplish this assignment -- no boundaries, no rules, no questions asked. Unfortunately, Forsyth's book reads like a boring, overly detailed chronicle of the events taken to carry out the President's decision rather than a suspenseful story with good dialogue and well-developed characters. Forsyth wrote The Cobra in a style that is highly narrative, with dialogue kept to a minimum, making the book very slow-paced. And, The Cobra, unlike many of Forsyth's previous books, is virtually devoid of character development, which contributed to my feeling that I never got to know any of the characters well enough to like or dislike them. I imagine that many of you who read my review and are fans of Frederick Forsyth will be skeptical that this author can write a book as bad as I'm describing. All I can say to you is that I hope you heed my advice and not read The Cobra. I'm sure you have better ways to spend your time and money.
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80 of 92 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars War on the Cocaine Cartel 17 Aug 2010
Format:Hardcover
This work of fiction was easy to read and it may be because I already had a working knowledge of almost ninety percent of the acronyms used. There is no need to have knowledge of all the acronyms for they are listed in the front of the book and explained as they are used in the narrative. The concept for the novel is rather bold, the president of the United States has decided that cocaine is a clear and present danger to the country; though those exact words are not used. An old school Central Intelligence Agency operative, Paul Deveraux, who was retired from the agency because of his violent yet effective methods is summon to accomplish the task.

From the formulation of the basic desire of the president and with an executive order in hand Mr. Deveraux begins his prep work of building the organization he will need to combat the world cocaine trade and try to stop it. The book does go into detail on this organization building and research performed on the cocaine trade. We the reader are also introduced to the inner workings of the cocaine trade from the inside and can watch the actions and reactions of both sides as the book progresses. The realistic action in the book spans the cocaine using world.

All the above mentioned background is told in great detail and takes about half the book to get us where most readers of action want to be, the actual operation. The reader is privy to the operations as they take place and the cocaine organizations response as these operations to destroy the cocaine industry unfolds. A calculated plan of action with a plot that is easy to read. The background of the inner details we learned earlier about the formation of the anti-drug teams and the drug cartel bear fruits as the story unfolds. A rich yet violent work of fiction that is filled with accurate facts on existing governmental agencies and their capabilities.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tooooo Long 9 Sep 2010
By Paul S Ell HALL OF FAME TOP 50 REVIEWER VINE VOICE
Format:Audio CD|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
This review relates to the 10 disk, 11 hour, unabridged reading of Forsyth's book by John Chancer and my comments should be seen in this context. I've haven't read any of Forsyth's work in the past but have to say I'd much rather have read this book than listen for hours to the rather dry narrative of Chancer. I'm afraid, unabridged, the monologue is simply too long and Chancer's style makes it easy for the mind to wander. The novel would appear to be the result of relatively detailed research into the cocaine trade and contains a lot of facts. This makes it even more unpalatable as an audio book as Chancer reads through the lists. Chancer makes little if any attempt to add characterisation to the individuals in the book and I found his narration tedious.

Trying to move away from the method of delivery of this novel, to the content itself, as noted, it is well researched but does not have a great deal of a story line. In particular I didn't like the representation of Obama and Cameron who are, of course, not mentioned by name but feature strongly as the leaders of the US and the UK. The only positive about this is that the book is at least up to date, but may well equally date. The slight surprise at the end of the 11 hour monologue, and I was still awake - just - is not particularly credible.

A fair novel, but a disastrous delivery. Buy the book or get the abridged audio version!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Okay but not a classic by any means 3 Sep 2010
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I got this ahead of Frederick Forsyth's appearance at the Edinburgh book festival, and was eagerly looking forward to it. Sadly, whilst it is an easy read, and I got through it in a day and half, I felt a bit disappointed at the end. Upon reflection, it is a good story and would have got a higher rating if by a lesser author, however it just doesn't match up to some of his earlier novels. The technical side is very good, although the character development is pretty thin, and you don't really care about any of them. That said, if you are looking for an easy read on holiday this is it.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but....
A good tale, as usual for Forsyth, but I found this one a bit far-fetched.
Published 20 hours ago by M. S. George
5.0 out of 5 stars and good service from Amazon
Cracking book. Usual Forsyth high standard. and good service from Amazon.
Published 3 days ago by NJR
3.0 out of 5 stars Half way
I have only got half way through the book but it's not holding my interest that Forsyth books usually do. I keep hoping it will get started
Published 22 days ago by Ann Walpole
5.0 out of 5 stars Good book
This is a good read by a reliable author. There are not enough Wilbur Smith/John Grisham books being written but this is a great adventure along similar lines to WS.
Published 24 days ago by Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 stars Standard Forsyth stuff
A good,easy read containing all the usual elements of a Forsyth thriller. The detail as always is excellent and the content and story line is realistic and therefore believable. Read more
Published 29 days ago by lancet
5.0 out of 5 stars a hard to put down tale
Usual Frederick Forsyth edge of your seat reading with an entertaining and plausible plot. An excellent read and good entertainment
Published 1 month ago by Carol A. Perry
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant.
A very believable book, & a perfect solution to the drug problem. Frederick Forsyth has done it again, in his own inimitable fashion.
Published 1 month ago by Janie S
5.0 out of 5 stars Completely engrossing.
This is a couldn't put down book in the best tradition of Frederick Forsyth.
Now I need to complete my FF. libruary.
Published 2 months ago by Norman Bolton
3.0 out of 5 stars not Freddie's best
I found this started promisingly, but the weakness in dialogue, ('documentary' style), excessive technical detail and plethora of characters eventually became boring and confusing.
Published 4 months ago by J A CALLOW
5.0 out of 5 stars Peter
I have read this book twice and no doubt will again, the story line was great but very complex so a time I might truly understand it.
Published 5 months ago by Peter
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