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The Clocks (Poirot) Paperback – 1 Jul 2008

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Product details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins; Masterpiece Ed edition (1 July 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0007121091
  • ISBN-13: 978-0007121090
  • Product Dimensions: 11.1 x 2.4 x 17.8 cm
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 164,377 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Born in Torquay in 1890, Agatha Christie began writing during the First World War and wrote over 100 novels, plays and short story collections. She was still writing to great acclaim until her death, and her books have now sold over a billion copies in English and another billion in over 100 foreign languages. Yet Agatha Christie was always a very private person, and though Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple became household names, the Queen of Crime was a complete enigma to all but her closest friends.

Product Description

Review

‘Deliberately fantastic.’ Times Literary Supplement

‘Superlative Christie… extremely ingenious.’ The Bookman

‘A sure-fire attention-gripper naturally.’ Saturday Review

‘Here is the grand-manner detective story in all its glory.’ New York Times

From the Back Cover

'Agatha Christe' 'was born in Torquay in 1890 and became, quite simply, the best-selling novelist in history. She wrote 80 crime mysteries and collections, and saw her work translated into more languages than Shakespeare. Her enduring success, enhanced by many film and TV adaptations, is a tribute to the timeless appeal of her characters and the unequalled ingenuity of her plots.'

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Holt on 22 May 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
First, the good. This novel introduces a plethora of excellent characters surrounding a Crescent where a most peculiar murder takes place in the home of a blind woman. The leading investigators are a Detective Inspector and a marine biologist who seems to work for both MI5 and MI6 - perhaps Christie was unaware of the distinction? There are, of course, ancillary murders - which led me to discover half the puzzle. Without giving the game away too much, I will now try to describe what's wrong with this book.

Christie was in her 70s when she wrote this, and obviously sick of Poirot - he doesn't make much contribution until the "action" is almost over. However, the main problem here is that the puzzle is unbelievable, and therefore, logically unsolvable. The culprit has some knowledge that they couldn't possibly have and the reason for the initial killing, and the circumstances surrounding it are, in my view, ridiculous and involve some irrational behaviour that is totally unexplained. There is also at least one error in the run-up to Poirot's summing-up - but this is sloppy, not fundamental - and, as I said, Christie was in her 70s.

Almost to the presentation of the solution, this is an excellent novel - well-written, good characters, and an interesting plot - let down in the home straight. The feeling I get is that Christie lost interest when it came to explaining the tangled web she wove! One almost gets the feeling that, as she aged, she could have developed a second career as a writer of excellent "straight" novels - she certainly had the insight and the technical ability. As I said in the title, mostly worth reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Godzilla on 24 Jan. 2012
Format: Paperback
This book by Agatha Christie centres around discovering the identity of a man found stabbed in the house of a blind woman - Miss Pebmarsh. There is also an attractive young typist (Sheila Webb) who has been ordered to visit the blind woman's house for contract work and on finding the dead man she runs screaming from the house into the arms of an investigator and police assistant.

The majority of the book hardly involves Poirot at all until the end when he unravels the mystery behind all the murders. The plot is woven by the investigations of Detective Inspector Dick Hardcastle and his unofficial investigator/spy friend - Colin Lamb with occasional consultations by Lamb to Poirot for advice along the way.

This story reminds me of Agatha's Miss Marple book - 4:50 from Paddington - where Marple investigates the murder of the dead woman in a large mansion by proxy through an acquaintance - Lucy Eyelesbarrow. Marple solves the whole mystery at the end without direct involvement. Poirot does the same here in 'The Clocks' and whenever Agatha does this in her books, to me at least, the pacing slows down as the Police fumble through the investigation and the plot becomes confusing and sometimes tiring to read.

I think Agatha did this in 'The Clocks' as she found it hard to find a reason to place Poirot at the scene of the crime without the permission of an official personage - such as Chief Inspector Japp in other Poirot stories. Another reason could be the section in 'The Clocks' where Poirot is at home in London reading many other murder mysteries and commenting on the detectives in question. In particular, Poirot (Agatha Christie) has an affection for Sherlock Holmes books - not for the plotting, but for the characters.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. H. VINE VOICE on 1 Oct. 2009
Format: Paperback
For anyone wanting to read Poirot investigating and solving a complex murder then this is not quite for you. Poirot is only a friend who helps out very late on in the book, it is over a hundred pages before he is even mentioned. That is why I gave it a low rating but other then that the mystery was interesting and you do get pulled in and get to know the characters. Christie fans wont be disappointed but Poirot fans might be.
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18 of 22 people found the following review helpful By I. Pearson on 27 Aug. 2005
Format: Audio CD
This Six disc Audio book gives you seven and a half hours of listening well worth the money. I found the Clocks quite funny, Agatha Christie has a good line in humor and Hugh Fraser does a very good job of portraying this humor in his performance.
Wilbraham Crescent certainly seems an interesting place to live!
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on 10 Feb. 2000
Format: Paperback
I recommend The Clocks to all fans of the murder mystery novel and to those of us grateful that Agatha Christie got into print and stayed there!
It is only a short time since I read my previous umpteenth Agatha Christie book and it won't be long before I'm back, I'm sure.
Even though the style is rather twee these days, there is no doubt that Christie's it kept me spellbound. I don't say this lightly: I realised about half of the way through the book that we hadn't seen a huge amount of action but I was reading and happy to carry on reading. Although there is blood and gore in a murder by stabbing, as was the primary event in this book, it doesn't dominate the story in an Agatha Christie book. There is no Hollywood style overkill (no pun intended) here.
The detectives are unassuming people. The other characters are often unassuming people. Even Hercule Poirot is unassuming; and he is the centre of this story by many measures, although he didn't appear in this story until it was almost half way through.
Of course, it is impossible to beat Poirot to the chase, as it is impossible to beat Miss Marple to the chase. I was determined, by the way, to pay attention and get there first this time; but of course I didn't. It's not possible! There are many red herrings in these books, together with information that the reader just cannot get to. Christie made her career out of red herrings and information underload; and we thrive on it don't we?: otherwise a murder mystery would simply become something like: man gets murdered, someone investigates the murder, the murderer is found. No need for Poirot, no need for Marple, no need to read the book.
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